Question about 1992 Chevrolet Camaro

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92 Camaro RS wont start after changing water hose

We changed our radiator fluid and hoses. Afterwards our vehicle wont start. The wires got near the battery got a little wet, that's all I can think it could be.

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Remove the battery cables and inspect them for corrosion build up. Clean with baking soda and warm water. Reinstall and try to start. Also check carging system. 13.5-14.5 volts when running.

Posted on May 24, 2009

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2 Answers

I need vacuum line schematic for a 1991 chevy camaro rs v8?


http://chevythunder.com/fuel%20injection%20vacuum%20lines.htm.

Dec 10, 2014 | 1991 Chevrolet Camaro

1 Answer

1994 toyota pickup 4x4 sr5 v6 overheats after changing coolant


Sounds like your water pump may be not working, while vehicle is off try squeezing both upper and lower radiator hose you should be able to feel the fluid in the lines and the hose should feel firm and not squish all the way together. Make sure you used the right coolant orange vs green and mix ratio. after all this has been confirmed start vehicle and squeeze hoses again before they get to hot to make sure the fluid is moving and now hoses should be pretty hard to squeeze at all while the truck is running. if you don't feel movement of fluids or hoses are very squishy it could be a vacuum leak and worst case your water pump, hope this helps-

Nov 29, 2013 | Toyota Pickup Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to change radiator fluid?


There should be a drain on the bottom of the radiator or you could also pull the lower radiator hose. With the radiator open or hose off, run the vehichle while adding water from a water hose. When the coolant is out and only clear water is coming out, turn off the water and shut off the vehicle. Let everything drain out and close the radiator drain or reconnect the radiator hose. You can then add the recommended coolant through your fill hole. Once full, you need to start the engine with the cap off to let the trapped air escape. When the air is all bled from the system, top off your coolant and your done.

Jan 30, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I changed my water pump on my 97 camaro RS after i discovered a bad leak while flushing my radiator. i changed the thermostat as well. the leak is not coming from the pump. It seems to beabove the water...


May be coming from the intake gaskets. Coolant does pass through the heads into the intake manifold.
There should also be coolant passages in the bottom of the Throttle Body. You would see a couple of 3/4 and/or 5/8 hoses and maybe a tube goiung into the Throttle Body. This is so warm water passes through the TB so it does not freeze up.

Sep 22, 2011 | 1997 Chevrolet Camaro

2 Answers

I have an 1997 chevy camro rs w a 134000 miles that is overheating the engine an water pump has been replaced an i stil cant find what is causing it to overheat


It could be the thermostat not opening and closing as it should. Or it could be a bad overflow/radiator cap. If the cap starts to go bad, it won't hold pressure and this will cause overheating. Good Luck. There are other major issues possible, but hopefully it's not. Start the engine cold and as the engine warms you should feel the thermostat open and water flowing as you hold the radiator hose, just be careful around moving fans.

May 13, 2011 | 1997 Chevrolet Camaro

1 Answer

2005 Chevy Impala...all I did was change the lower radiator hose because it was leaking. Now the car overheats, the upper hose is hot and the lower hose is warm. Does this model have vapor lock issues or...


the lower radiator hose is a return hose and there are no vapor lock issues. If your coolant level is full when you start your vehicle and when it heats up and the system pressurizes your coolant expands with heat and then that excess pressure will go through the overflow outlet to the reservoir and the reservoir has a relief opening near the top to relieve pressure or for excess fluid to come out. If the lower hose is just warm then your water pump may not be circulating properly (be sure to check belt for tension no more than 1/2 inch of play should be present). One messy way to test water pump would be to first drain coolant if it is good to reuse it, then remove the lower hose, open the radiator cap and put a water hose in it and turn on half way. Look at the volume of water coming out and have someone start the vehicle and idle at about 2000 rpm if that volume has not doubled your pump is bad

Apr 28, 2011 | 2005 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

Flushing radiator


Your cooling system should be flushed every other year. No, I'm not crazy, but with all the new chemicals they use today, it will literally eat up the rubber hoses and deteriorate the heater core, and the radiator core.
Have a drain pan under the drain plug, or the lower radiator hose, to catch the old fluid. EPA doesn't want you to let it run out onto the ground--it will contaminate Earth!
Make sure the engine is cold! Hot antifreeze burns dramatically and it will burn you, too!
If you can get to the drain plug, (sometimes it's hard to get to) you can put a piece of 3/8 inch hose onto it. Put the other end into the drain pan and open the drain plug. This will let the fluid empty into the drain pan--that way all the fluid will go into the drain pan and not spread out and drip all over the place. Remove the radiator cap.
If you want, and it's much faster, you can remove the lower radiator hose from the radiator. Use caution, though, you don't want to break the neck on the radiator--that's a no-no.
It is better to have the drain plug opened, though, when you start to flush.
A word of caution! Antifreeze/summer coolant is very toxic. Don't get it on the body paint, or on your skin. Wash it off with water! Another thing, it will kill your pets if they drink it, so keep them, and children, away from it, remember, I warned you!:-)
Some vehicles have a vent plug. It's located near the thermostat housing (where the upper radiator hose is connected to). Open this to vent: the fluid will empty out better.
Now will be a good time to inspect the hoses. Look at the heater hoses: are they swelled near the clamps? Do they feel hard, or real soft? If so, replace them. The same with the upper and lower radiator hoses. If your vehicle has a by-pass hose (from the water pump to the thermostat housing) check it also. Don't be skimpy here, a little for a hose now will save a lot later. Replace the hose clamps, too, if they need replacing. I hate those "clip" type, and they are usually in need of replacing.
You can get a "flush kit" at most auto parts stores. Read the instruction as to how to install it. Most of the time you can cut the heater hose going to the waterpump and install it there. They are designed to be a permanent fixture: you can leave it hooked up.
After you have installed the flush kit you need to hook up the garden hose to the fitting. It might be best for you to remove the thermostat, as cool water will close it and restrict flow.
Turn the water faucet on, not too much, and leave the radiator cap off and the drain open. If water spews from the vent plug opening, put it back in.
Crank the engine and let it idle. Watch the fluid coming from the 3/8 tubing. When the fluid is clear as water, ha, you can turn the faucet off and then turn the ignition switch off.
You may need two drain pans to catch all the fluid, plus, you will need to find a place in your city to dispose the fluid: a repair shop, or disposal plant. Do not pour it out on the ground: EPA!!!
Let the vehicle cool down. After the engine is cold you can turn the water faucet on again and reflush. There is no need to restart the engine, just let the water run through the block, heater core, and radiator. Let this go for about two or three minutes, then you can turn the water off and remove the garden hose. Put the cap that came with the kit over the spout after you remove the garden hose...you won't have to remove the flush kit, just leave it there for the next time.
They make chemicals to flush systems that have a lot of rust and deposits in them, but this procedure will work in most cases.
Be sure you have the lower radiator hose clamp tight (if you removed it), and have the drain plug tight (remove the hose if you put one on).
Now you can add your antifreeze/summer coolant. Depending on where you live, most vehicle manufacturers recommend a 50/50 solution. Look in your owner's manual and see what they recommend. If your vehicle holds two gallons of coolant, then you want to put in one gallon of coolant and one gallon of water.
If your vehicle doesn't have a vent plug, you can fill the radiator to the top, then crank the engine. Note: If you removed the thermostat, be sure to reinstall it, I'd recommend installing a new one.
After you crank the engine, let it idle. Watch the radiator filler spout, water may overflow. If it does, put the cap back on. Feel of the upper radiator hose. When it gets warm to hot, then the thermostat has opened and you can remove the radiator cap slowly. If no water tries to escape, then you can remove it and add water.
Most vehicles of late have a plastic reservoir. After you have the radiator full you can fill the reservoir to the line on the side of the container, "full cold", with water.
Now, start the engine again and let it idle. Look for leaks (repair them if you have any) and watch the temperture guage. If you have a light you will have to feel of the upper radiator hose to tell when the engine is at operating temperture: the hose will be very hot. Most vehicles run a 190o thermostat, so you won't be able to hold the hose very long, unless you're a hot-metal worker. :-)
No leaks? Temperture ok? Fluid level full? You're a genius! You are ready to do some more "maintenance" on your vehicle, and you don't have to take it to the repair shop.

Mar 08, 2010 | 2001 GMC Savana

1 Answer

1990 jeep grand wagoneer and i need to knoww how to flush the cooling system


Your cooling system should be flushed every other year. No, I'm not crazy, but with all the new chemicals they use today, it will literally eat up the rubber hoses and deteriorate the heater core, and the radiator core.
Have a drain pan under the drain plug, or the lower radiator hose, to catch the old fluid. EPA doesn't want you to let it run out onto the ground — it will contaminate Earth!
If you want, and it's much faster, you can remove the lower radiator hose from the radiator. Use caution, though, you don't want to break the neck on the radiator — that's a no-no. It is better to have the drain plug opened, though, when you start to flush.
A word of caution! Antifreeze/summer coolant is very toxic. Don't get it on the body paint, or on your skin. Wash it off with water! Another thing, it will kill your pets if they drink it, so keep them, and children, away from it, remember, I warned you! Some vehicles have a vent plug. It's located near the thermostat housing (where the upper radiator hose is connected to). Open this to vent: the fluid will empty out better.


Now will be a good time to inspect the hoses. Look at the heater hoses: are they swelled near the clamps? Do they feel hard, or real soft? If so, replace them. The same with the upper and lower radiator hoses.
If your vehicle has a by-pass hose (from the water pump to the thermostat housing) check it also. Don't be skimpy here, a little for a hose now will save a lot later. Replace the hose clamps, too, if they need replacing. I hate those "clip" types, and they are usually in need of replacing.
You can get a "flush kit" at most auto parts stores. Read the instruction as to how to install it. Most of the time you can cut the heater hose going to the waterpump and install it there. They are designed to be a permanent fixture: you can leave it hooked up.
After you have installed the flush kit you need to hook up the garden hose to the fitting. It might be best for you to remove the thermostat, as cool water will close it and restrict flow.
Turn the water faucet on, not too much, and leave the radiator cap off and the drain open. If water spews from the vent plug opening, put it back in.
Crank the engine and let it idle. Watch the fluid coming from the 3/8 tubing. When the fluid is clear as water, ha, you can turn the faucet off and then turn the ignition switch off.
You may need two drain pans to catch all the fluid, plus, you will need to find a place in your city to dispose the fluid: a repair shop, or disposal plant. Do not pour it out on the ground
Let the vehicle cool down. After the engine is cold you can turn the water faucet on again and reflush. There is no need to restart the engine, just let the water run through the block, heater core, and radiator. Let this go for about two or three minutes, then you can turn the water off and remove the garden hose. Put the cap that came with the kit over the spout after you remove the garden hose ... you won't have to remove the flush kit, just leave it there for the next time.
They make chemicals to flush systems that have a lot of rust and deposits in them, but this procedure will work in most cases.
Be sure you have the lower radiator hose clamp tight (if you removed it), and have the drain plug tight (remove the hose if you put one on).
Now you can add your antifreeze/summer coolant. Depending on where you live, most vehicle manufacturers recommend a 50/50 solution. Look in your owner's manual and see what they recommend. If your vehicle holds two gallons of coolant, then you want to put in one gallon of coolant and one gallon of water.
If your vehicle doesn't have a vent plug, you can fill the radiator to the top, then crank the engine.
Note: If you removed the thermostat, be sure to reinstall it; I'd recommend installing a new one.
After you crank the engine, let it idle. Watch the radiator filler spout, water may overflow. If it does, put the cap back on. Feel of the upper radiator hose. When it gets warm to hot, then the thermostat has opened and you can remove the radiator cap slowly. If no water tries to escape, then you can remove it and add water.
Most vehicles of late have a plastic reservoir. After you have the radiator full you can fill the reservoir to the line on the side of the container, "full cold", with water.
Now, start the engine again and let it idle. Look for leaks (repair them if you have any) and watch the temperture guage. If you have a light you will have to feel of the upper radiator hose to tell when the engine is at operating temperture: the hose will be very hot.
Most vehicles run a 190° thermostat, so you won't be able to hold the hose very long. No leaks?
Temperature ok?
Fluid level full?

Jul 08, 2009 | 1990 Jeep Wagoneer Limited

1 Answer

Leaking alot of water /coolant


You have answered your own question almost. You will need to jack the car up and inspect everything being that its 91 camara, there is defintely enough room to inspect everything. You either have a hose leak, a radiator or water pump leak. Only inspection will find that out. Thank you,
Lee

Jun 27, 2009 | 1991 Chevrolet Camaro

3 Answers

Car overheat frequently and at time the engine sound is very loud


Several things can cause this overheating. Have you recently done a:
1. Check Hoses for Leaks
2. Check Radiator for Leaks --- Also, Change Radiator Cap ( can loose pressure there if
cap is bad)
3. Check Water Pump for Leaks. If Water Pump is bad, you will hear a loud noise from it
4 Complete Tune Up? Should be done at least 1x a Yr. Depending on how much you drive the Vehicle. Includes: Plugs, Plug Wires, Gas Filter, Air Breather Filter, PCV Valve, Adjust Timing,
Check Belts -- see if worn
5. Changed your Thermostat & Gasket and have the correct degree Thermostat in the Vehicle?
6.. Had your Radiator Rod and Cleaned out?
7. Temperture Sending Unit (located near Thermostat) could be bad
8. 02-Sensor (Generally located in the Exhaust Manifold - needs a socket with a space in it
to allow the Socket to fit over this top wire of the 0-2 Sensor )
9. Change oil and oil Filter.
10. Change Gas Tank Cap ---

Do all this yearly ( except the Radiator Rod & Clean ( do every 2-3 yrs), and you should not have
any over-heating nor stalling out, etc. and should pass emissions as well.

Nov 25, 2008 | Hyundai Elantra Cars & Trucks

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