Question about 2005 Mercedes-Benz C-Class

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Coolant loss with no signs of overheating

Coolant loss from reservoir with no signs of engine overheating.

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  • colin_cardoz May 23, 2009

    coolant pressure test done, no signs of leakage. above occurs randomly sometimes after 1200 kms or even after 200 kms.

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Check the bottom of you coolant bottle to see if you have a crack and check all of you hoses as well try this website to see if the have your car listed its www.alldatadiy.com hope this help you Michigan Man.

Posted on May 22, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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What to do when 2006 Chrysler Pacifica engine temp warning light comes on?


Do not continue to operate. Operating an overheated engine will cause the engine to fail.

After the engine has cooled,
Confirm that the engine has coolant.
Confirm that the reservoir is full to the mark
Start engine and confirm as engine gets warm cooling fan at radiator turns on

Confirm that the rubber engine belt is working
Put in car heater to full hot and blower on.
Confirm heat is hot from car heater.
If heater is not hot possible water pump failure or air in coolant system keeping the coolant from circulating.
Allow to cool completely.
Remove cap start engine and observe coolant flowing at or near cap. Observe bubbling or exhaust gases coming from radiator

Check for water in oil by pulling dip stick
  • White smoke from the exhaust pipe
  • Overheating engine
  • Bubbles in the radiator or coolant overflow tank
  • White milky oil
  • Significant loss of coolant with no visible leaks
If milky likely a blown head gasket

Hope this helps?
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Jun 29, 2017 | Chrysler Cars & Trucks

Tip

Vehicle overheating tips


If your vehicle engine coolant temperature gauge indicates overheating, if you experience a loss of power,or if you hear a loud knocking or pinging noise, the engine has probably overheated. You should follow this procedure............

Pull safe off the road, stop the vehicle and turn on our emergency flasher. Put the transmission in "P" (automatic) or neutral (manual) and apply the parking brake. Turn off the air conditioning if it is being used.

If coolant or steam is boiling out of the radiator or reservoir, stop the engine. Wait until the steam subsides before opening the hood. If there is no coolant boiling over the steam, leave the engine running. CAUTION: To avoid personal injury, keep the hood closed until there is not steam. Escaping steam or coolant is a sign of very hing pressure.

Visually check to see if the engine drive belt (fan belt) is broken or loose. Lock for obvious coolant leaks from the radiator, hoses, and under the vehicle. However, note that water draining from the air conditioning is normal if it has been used. CAUTION: When the engine is running, keep hands and clothing away from the moving fan engine drive belt.

If the engine drive belt is broken or the coolant is leaking, stop the engine immediately and call your mechanic of assistance.

If the engine drive belt is okay and there are no obvious leaks, you may help the engine cool down more quickly by running it at about 1500 rpm for a few minutes with the accelerator pedal lightly depressed.

Check the coolant reservoir. If it is dry, add coolant to the reservoir while the engine is running. Fill it about half full. CAUTION:Do not attempt to remove the radiator cap when the radiator are hot. Serious injury could result from scalding hot fluid and steam blown out under pressure.

After the engine coolant temperature has cooled to normal, again check the coolant level in the reservoir. If necessary, bring it up to half full again. Serious coolant loos indicates a leak in the system. You should have it checked as soon as possible at your mechanic's workshop.

Good luck.

on Nov 08, 2010 | Toyota Pickup Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

My car has white smoke coming from the exhaust


he causes of white exhaust smoke can vary; however, it is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke.
One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located.

Nov 17, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

Coolant reservoir empty after sitting overnight


Check the water pump and see if coolant is around it.

Jul 26, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 1998 Mazda millenia Is shorting white smoke more tell pipe what could be the problem


It is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke. One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located. THESE LEAKS WILL CAUSE SEVERE ENGINE DAMAGE! Have the car inspected immediately.

I
Internal coolant leaks can and will cause

Jul 30, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Why is my coolant reservoir smoking and leaking water


Hi Diane
Most common cause of overheating is a gradual loss of coolant from the thermostat housing seal. You need to top up and bleed the system and arrange to have the thermostat housing checked / replaced.

Mar 24, 2014 | 2009 Mini Cooper

1 Answer

Overheating, loss of coolant, reservoir not working


Sounds like to me your mechanic is on the right track by having the rad cap changed. If the coolant becomes low again in the near future and there is no visible fluid leak on outside of engine or on floor/ground then your problem is internal and possibly a head gasket.

Jun 22, 2012 | 2004 Kia Sedona

1 Answer

Its keeps overheating i change radiator and head gasket and still overheating


Did you also replace your thermostat? If it's stuck closed, engine will overheat.
When you did the HG, did you have head checked for cracks or warpage? A cracked head will cause severe overheating.A warped head may or may not show signs of external coolant leakage. Either of these conditions can occur if overheating is severe enough.
Are your hoses in good shape? An old hose can collapse when it's hot, and restrict flow. Feel them (when cool) for any sign of sponginess.
New radiator cap? The cap provides a seal to pressurize the cooling system.
Finally, how about your water pump? Any sign at the weep-hole of leaking coolant? Your water pump inner seal is bad, remedy is a new water pump. Or maybe the pumps' fins have corroded and not pushing coolant sufficiently. If there is corrosion, get the whole system flushed and start anew.
Pull your spark plugs and look for any sign of coolant in the cylinders. I know it's a pain to keep going back and checking, but you gotta be thorough. Plugs may be blistered white from overheating, but if you get it fixed, they should be alright.
Now, finally, really: sometimes, Randy, just a small air pocket in coolant can cause overheating. So, make sure you bleed the system if it has a bleed screw, or fill, cap loose, run engine till t-stat opens, level in radiator drops, then re-fill, and add coolant to your overflow reservoir to around the full hot mark. Tighten cap, and you are done. Good luck.

Oct 20, 2011 | 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Coolant loss no leak


hi.

Check compression. If the leak is internal, then the most common cause is the head gasket. Water (or coolant) leaks internally through the worn head gasket reaching the cylinders where it gets vaporized. Symptoms are coolant fluid level going down, bad performance, loss of compression, overheating, white smoke because of vaporized coolant from exhaust, traces of fuel in coolant reservoir etc.

If head gasket is Ok and there is no overheating, then the leak is external. Check pump, radiator and coolant lines.

Regards.

Ginko.

Oct 16, 2011 | 2000 GMC Yukon XL

1 Answer

Hi, there is a gurgling sound coming from my BH5 2 litre N/A Legacy. Yesterday it started overheating, it has yet to reach past 3/4 on the temp gauge but that's only because I stopped driving it


Sounds that you are low on coolant so low that the coolant sensor is no longer immersed in it If the coolant sensor is prevented from working, due to low levels of coolant, then the engine radiator cooling fan will not be started and overheating will result. The gurgling you hear is due to air in the system. When the engine is cold remove the coolant reservoir cap. Set the interior heater to max temperature. Top up the reservoir to the maximum limit with water/antifreeze mix (2:1 is usual). Start the the engine. Be prepared to add more coolant mix as air is cleared from the system. When the top hose from the engine to the radiator gets warm give it plenty of squeezing to help shift any air pockets. The fan should also start at about this time. Make sure that the interior heater is blowing hot air. When the gurgling has stopped and no more coolant needs to be added to stay at the max level then replace the reservoir cap and secure it firmly. Allow the engine to reach running temperature. Check all hoses, junctions, gaskets water pump seal etc for any signs of leaks as it would be good to detect any cause for the previous loss of coolant.

Apr 30, 2011 | Subaru Legacy Cars & Trucks

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