Question about 1995 Toyota Celica

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2004 Huyndai Santa Fe - Negative camber on rear passenger side

I had my tires rotated, balanced and aligned last summer. When picking up the vehicle I noticed that it had a negative camber on both rear tires.

I recently took the car in for a new alignment at a different shop. The rear camber readings came back:
Left, actual -0.2, before -1.8
Right, actual -0.2, before -1.6

The shop now exchanged the right rear camber bolt, and redid the alignment:
Left, actual -0.1, before -0.2
Right, actual -0.2, before -1.7

Rear Cross Camber, actual 0.1, before 1.5
Total Toe, actual -0.26, before -1.45
Thrust Angle, actual 0.22, before 0.56

The Mechanic says "this is the best they can do", and I should take the car to someone who deals with collision issues. I am confused, this car has never been in an accident. How did this happen? My question: Is it safe to drive the car like this, and will the negative camber increase again? - I had people who drove behind me stop me to point out the right rear tire being angled. What should I do?

Thanks so much!
Michaela

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  • ea0367 May 21, 2009

    Thanks for the detailed explanation. I will let the dealership have a look at it. :)

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  • Toyota Master
  • 6,982 Answers

It is possible for the chassis to sag, but this is far more common with much larger, heavier vehicles. Likely, you have something in the suspension that is bent or mount bushings that are worn oblong where the center bolt passes through. A good shop can find this after a careful examination. subtle bends are difficult to detect...parts have factory bends in them and unless removed and matched up side by side with a known good part, you would never see the difference. Bending does not always involve an accident. A sideways slide into a curb in snow or even a decent pothole at the right angle can cause a bend. Likely it is not unsafe but it will wear your tires.

Posted on May 21, 2009

  • Richard Scordino May 21, 2009

    Usually don't like dealers, but they have more in the way of specifications to use and likely have seen this a few times in the past.
    Once tore an upper control arm off a chevy going 15mph (hit a curb not paying attention)...just an example of how sometimes stuff can happen...It wasn't the speed, but the angle that caused to to fail.
    Hope you get good results!!!


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SOURCE: Negative rear right camber

If you bought this vehicle second hand then you need to get your vehicle checked for crash damage. Your insurer can do a check on a vehicle register for a small cost, but that is only if the vehicle was damaged AND repaired/written off via an insurer. this does not guarantee that the vehicle has never been in an accident, you need to look underneath to see if there are any kinks, tears or ripples that don't look quite right. But I would advise taking to a professional repair shop for a good look over.
If the bolt has been replaced, and the readings are correct, then you should be safe enough, just drive steady. But if you are suspect of this vehicle get it checked .

Posted on May 21, 2009

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My 1998 Acura CL 2.3L with double wishbone suspension has the rear, passenger side tire is wearing out on the inside and sometimes it squeals while driving.


Have the rear suspension checked for worn parts. If ok, an alignment check should show either negative toe setting, or a negative camber setting on that wheel. This can sometimes be adjusted out, but often indicates a bent component.

Feb 10, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

Tip

Should I worry about my vehicle's alignment


Alignment refers to the way your car's wheels are positioned. Your wheels should be parallel and facing forward.

How does alignment affect my vehicle?
When your wheels are properly aligned, you'll get better gas mileage, your tires will last longer, steering will be easier, and your ride will be smoother and safer.

What could go wrong with my alignment?
Several factors could contribute to a shift in alignment including old, worn-out components including Ball Joints, Control arm bushings, and poor road conditions, resulting in a few different problems including Camber, Toe and Caster, and if any of these problems develop, they will take a toll on your vehicle's tires, performance and manageability. Worn out shocks and struts can also be a serious problem with un-even tire wear.


Camber
The wheels are tilted, either inward or outward. This will create pulling and tire wear.


Toe
A change in the distance between the front and back of the front or rear tires. This will wear on the tires, too.


Caster
A backward or forward tilt at the top of the wheel's spindle support arm. This will cause either loose or difficult steering.



If any of these problems develop, they will begin to take their toll on your car's tires and performance, as well as steering

How will I recognize a problem with my alignment?
Check your steering wheel when you're driving. Does it stay straight? Does it vibrate? When you are traveling along a straight road, does your vehicle pull to one side? Is your steering loose, or difficult to control? Have you noticed uneven tire wear?


Check your tires periodically. A number of different things can affect your tires - from alignment to suspension components.
As a general rule, you should have your alignment and related components, such as ball joints, control arm bushings, checked every 10,000 miles or once a year, and there are three types of alignment jobs with a good-better-best approach.

GOOD
Two-wheel geometric centerline alignment.
This adjusts the toe on your front wheels only. This will work only if your rear wheels are properly aligned. (Used mostly on trucks and older rear-wheel drive cars).

BETTER
Four-wheel thrust line alignment.
This aligns the front wheels to the rear-wheel alignment.

BEST
Complete four-wheel thrust line alignment.
This is the optimal approach: aligning all wheels straight ahead and parallel.

After a thorough review of your alignment, your The Wright Import technician will present you with the findings and all of your options before beginning any work on your vehicle.

What is a wheel alignment? How does it effect handling and tire wear? When should I do an alignment? What causes alignments to go out? How would I know if my alignment is out?

A wheel alignment is nothing more than setting the angle of the hub/wheel so it tracks in the right direction. Most vehicles have four-wheel alignments, meaning each of the four wheels is separately aligned. Your basic alignment consists of three angles: camber, caster and toe-in. Camber is the tilt of the tire when viewed from the front of the car. Positive camber means the top of the tire is tilted away from the car. Negative camber means the top is tilted in. Camber has a lot to do with cornering performance. Too much negative camber will wear the inside of the tires prematurely. Too much positive camber will wear the outside tread.

Caster is the inclination of the front spindle. Picture the angle of the forks on a bike top to bottom. When the caster is out, it creates a pull or wandering condition and sometimes a slow responding steering wheel. Toe-in is measured in inches or degrees. Viewing from the front of the car, it is the difference between the front and rear center-line of the tire. Toe-in means the fronts of the tires are closer together. Toe-out means, the fronts of the tires are farther apart. Toe-in or out has the most effect on tire wear.

When your car is out of alignment, the tires will wear prematurely. In some extreme cases, new tires will be gone within 500 miles. At the price of tires, especially high performance tires with soft compounds, you want to keep your vehicle in alignment as long as possible. Other symptoms of an out-of-alignment car are poor handling, pulling to one side, or wandering from side-to-side. An alignment will also affect the steering wheel response and how quickly it returns to the center.

Your vehicle's alignment should be checked every 10,000 to 12,000 miles. Any harsh impact such as potholes, curbs, objects in the road, or the damage of an accident, should prompt you to have your alignment checked. If you do any modifications to your suspension, raising or lowering your car, that will affect the alignment angles. Even changing the tire size will effect the alignment. Loose, worn or bent suspension parts such as ball joints, springs, bushings, and control arms will have an adverse affect on your alignment, too. In most cases you do not know if your alignment is out. The best way to check it is with a precision alignment machine. Laser optics combined with a computer allow for the most accuracy in alignment readings.

Remember you are aligning the hub of your vehicle. Check to see if the alignment shop or dealer has equipment that attaches to the hub, not the wheel. Many independent shops that do alignments have a specialty tool called "Tru Align" that attaches to the hub. This will make for a much more accurate alignment with the added bonus of not damaging the delicate finish on your wheels.

There is a lot more to suspension alignment, especially if you push your vehicle on the track. The modifications you make on your suspension are just the beginning. Once you start down this road you will be concerned with things like bump steer, weighting (vertical load), pre-loading, tire traction versus tire load, and more. Now you're thinking under-steer, over-steer, tire compound, sway bar design, and other topics that can be covered in a later article. For now, just remember to have your vehicle aligned every 10,000 to 12,000 miles in normal driving conditions.
If you accidentally hit a curb, or drive through a nasty pothole or other road obstruction, that would be a cue to have your car's alignment checked more often. Proper alignment is good for your car. It will save unnecessary wear on your tires. It will ensure that your vehicle is giving you the handling the factory designed the car to have. And, most importantly, a properly aligned car is safer and more fun to drive. Have your alignment, ball joints and suspension checked regularly checked regularly

on Dec 11, 2009 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Strong front end vibration at speeds over 60 mph. Shocks, ball joints have been replaced and wheels aligned and balanced. Took it to a tire repair shop and they couldn't find problem. Any ideas on...


You need to have someone look at it that is experienced in NVH (Noise, Vibration and Harshness). Front end vibrations can be caused by many things. Each possibility needs to be systematically eliminated to find the cause. Someone who is experienced in this can eliminate several possibilities by simply driving the vehicle...Did the tire shop even bother to road test it? I'll bet not!

Sometimes INTERNAL tire problems can cause a vibration that cannot be found (or eliminated as a possibility) by putting the tires on a balance machine. To eliminate this as a possibility, rotate the tires front-to-rear one side at a time then drive the vehicle to see if the vibration changes or "moves". If it does, then the tire that just got rotated to the rear is the problem.

Also, the vehicle can be run on a lift to see if the vibration can be duplicated in the shop. Many times, if the vibration is being caused by a drive axle or CV joint, it can be located by running the vehicle on a lift this way. In the case of 4-wheel drive vehicles, it will be necessary to engage the front axles to get them spinning on the lift.

The entire steering and suspension system should be checked for looseness in the tie rods, stabilizer links and frame bushings, control arm bushings, etc. Any looseness in any of these parts can cause vibrations at certain speeds.

I have also seen vibrations that act similar to a tire being out of balance that occurs when the brake rotors loose a balancing weight on some vehicles. This may or may not apply to your vehicle, (yours may not have balance weights in the rotors) but this type of vibration can usually also be verified by running the vehicle on a lift.

Jun 12, 2011 | 2002 Hyundai Santa Fe

2 Answers

I want to know how to fix the alignment on my 1995 honda accord ex.


Before making wheel alignment adjustment, perform the following checks:
  1. Tires should be equal in size and runout must not be excessive. Tires and wheels should be in balance, and inflated to manufacturer's specifications.

  2. Wheel bearings must be properly adjusted. Steering linkage and suspension must not have excessive looseness. Check for wear in tie rod ends and ball joints.
  3. Steering gear box must not have excessive play. Check and adjust to manufacturer's specifications.
  4. Vehicle must be at curb height with full fuel load and spare tire in vehicle. No extra load should be on vehicle.
  5. Vehicle must be level with floor and with suspension settled. Jounce front and rear of vehicle several times and allow it to settle to normal curb height.
  6. If steering wheel is not centered with front wheels in straight-ahead position, correct by shortening one tie rod adjusting sleeve and lengthening opposite sleeve equal amounts.
  7. Ensure wheel lug nuts are tightened to torque specifications
Ride Height Adjustment

Before adjusting alignment, check riding height. Riding height must be checked with vehicle on level floor and tires properly inflated. Passenger and luggage compartments must be unloaded. Bounce vehicle several times, and allow suspension to settle. Visually inspect vehicle from front to rear and from side to side for signs of abnormal height.
Measure riding height. See figure. Riding height between left and right sides of vehicle should vary less than 1′ (25.4 mm). If riding height is not within specification, check suspension components and repair or replace them as necessary.
Wheel Alignment Procedures

Honda recommends using commercially available computerized 4-wheel alignment equipment. Follow equipment manufacturer instructions to obtain vehicle alignment settings. Use following procedures for necessary adjustments.
Civic Camber Adjustment
Compare camber settings with vehicle manufacturer recommendations. If camber is incorrect, check for bent or damaged front suspension components. Replace faulty components. Recheck camber.
Civic Caster Adjustment
DO NOT use more than 2 shims. If more than 2 shims are required to adjust caster angle, check for bent or damaged suspension components.
Compare caster settings with vehicle manufacturer recommendations. If caster is incorrect, check for bent or damaged front suspension components. Replace faulty components. Recheck caster.
Civic Toe-In Adjustment

  1. Secure steering wheel in straight-ahead position. Measure front wheel toe-in. If adjustment is needed, loosen tie rod lock nuts. Turn both tie rods equally in the same direction until front wheels are in straight-ahead position and toe-in reading is correct. Tighten tie rod lock nuts. Reposition tie rod boots if twisted.
  2. Ensure parking brake is released. Check rear wheel toe-in. If adjustment is needed, hold adjusting bolt on rear compensator arm and loosen lock nut. See figure. Adjust rear toe-in by sliding rear control arm until rear toe-in is correct. Install NEW lock nut, and tighten it while holding adjusting bolt.
Wheel Alignment Specifications

  • Camber - Measurement in degrees.
    • Front: 0 (range -1 to 1)
    • Rear: 0.33 (range -1.33 to 0.67)
  • Caster - Measurement in degrees.
    • 1.17 (range 0.17 to 2.17)
  • Toe-In - Measurement in inches (mm).
    • Front: -0 (0)
    • Rear: 0.08 (2.0)
  • Toe-In - Measurement in degrees.
    • Front: 0.00 (range - 0.16 to 0.16)
  • Toe-Out On Turns - Measurement in degrees.
    • Inner: 41.00
    • Outer: 33.50
Torque Specifications Ft. Lbs (N.m)

  • Rear Control Arm Adjusting Bolt: 48 (65)
  • Spindle Nut: 136 (185)
  • Tie Rod Lock Nut: 41 (55)
  • Wheel Lug Nuts: 80 (108)
hope this helps you out.

May 09, 2011 | 1995 Honda Accord

2 Answers

Negative rear right camber


If you bought this vehicle second hand then you need to get your vehicle checked for crash damage. Your insurer can do a check on a vehicle register for a small cost, but that is only if the vehicle was damaged AND repaired/written off via an insurer. this does not guarantee that the vehicle has never been in an accident, you need to look underneath to see if there are any kinks, tears or ripples that don't look quite right. But I would advise taking to a professional repair shop for a good look over.
If the bolt has been replaced, and the readings are correct, then you should be safe enough, just drive steady. But if you are suspect of this vehicle get it checked .

May 21, 2009 | 2004 Hyundai Santa Fe

1 Answer

Wheel alignment 2007 Santa Fe needs a camber kit


I do alignments.. Some programs require a certain amount of weight to be distributed inside the vehicle.. some programs compensate.. some programs dont even care..Find out what they are using.. However , the camber kit sounds right. I recommend hunter alignment equipment be used on mine.. Hope this helps.. Good luck

Mar 11, 2009 | 2007 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited

2 Answers

Persistent Wheel Alignment Problem


Hard to tell here without seeing some kinda specs from your alignments. There were some issues on rear tire wear on these. It was mainly inner wear on rear tires and the rear camber specs were beyond the negative end of the specifications(max -2.3). They had a revised +1.0 degree upper control arm to address that. If you are not feeling any rebound in the travel you could have a worn or damaged strut,with this many miles that is certainly a possibility.

Feb 12, 2009 | 2000 Ford Focus

1 Answer

How can the rear suspension be adjusted?


REAR WHEEL ALIGNMENT
TOE-IN : 0±2 mm (0±0.08 in.)
note_icon.gif 1. The rear suspension lower arm mounting cam bolt should be turned an equal amount on both sides during adjustment. Right wheel : Clockwise direction : toe-in Left wheel : Clockwise direction : ton-out Maximum difference between LH and RH : 3mm 2. The cam bolt should be adjusted within a 90° range left or right from the center position. CAMBER Standard value : 0°±30´ Maximum difference between LH and RH : 3mm : 0±2 mm (0±0.08 in.) note_icon.gif 1. The rear suspension upper arm mounting cam bolt should be turned an equal amount on both sides during adjustment. 2. Install the left and right springs which have the same identification color. 3. The cam bolt should be adjusted within a 90° range left and right from the center position.e55b100.gif TIRE WEAR 1. Measure the tread depth of the tires. Tread depth of tire [Limit] : 1.6 mm (0.06 in.) 2. If the remaining tread depth is less than the limit, replace the tire. note_icon.gif When the tread depth of the tire is reduced to 1.6 mm (0.06 in.) or less, the wear indicators will appear.

Jun 16, 2008 | 2004 Hyundai Santa Fe

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