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Temperature gauge My temperature gauge gives erratic readings. It seems like it is overheating. The fan kicks in as usual but the gauge still seems to register erractically. I do not know whether its a connection problem or a sensor issue.

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  • Expert
  • 60 Answers

Air lock in the coolant system?

Posted on Jan 03, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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freetek
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SOURCE: 2004 Bonneville - Temperature Gauge is Erratic

Since there is no voltage applied with the ignition off, if the gauge is not dropping down all the way, it is the gauge that has failed.
Temperature sensors are frequent failures but they are not active when the car isn't powered up. They can be intermittant, high, low but with no power, the gauge itself should go to the minimum.  

Posted on Jan 19, 2009

  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: Temp Gauge acting erratically

you have to bleed the system coolant

Posted on Mar 23, 2009

GM Elec
  • 1000 Answers

SOURCE: Temperature sensor problem?

There are 2 different circuit that control the cooling fans.
The engine controller turns the low speed fan circuit on to control temperature and turns on the high speed fan circuit if the engine and A/C is running.
It sounds like your low speed fan function is not working.
Find your fan 1 fuse located in the under hood fuse panel and make sure it is not blown. If OK go to next step.
Find your fan 1 relay located in the under hood fuse panel. Find another relay in the fuse panel that matches and swap the two. If the fan then works you know you have a bad relay.
If both are check good, let me know and we will go from there.
Below, I have attached the wiring diagram for your cooling system, hope it helps.
Regards,
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Posted on Mar 27, 2009

localwonder
  • 6784 Answers

SOURCE: temperature gauge not working,stay cold

Hi. the vdc at the sensor seems to be fine. if the ground is sufficient, i would replace the gauge. its malfunctioning. Check for loose connection at gauge before replacing the gauge.

Posted on May 14, 2009

  • 749 Answers

SOURCE: Cooling fans not kicking in at high temperature.

could be the water temp.sensor is faulty try to re-attach plug-in elecrtical connections, especially from the radiator to the fan.

Posted on May 20, 2009

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Not cooling,has new impeller and thermostate


Steve, there's many causes of overheating. You say you have a new water pump and thermostat, so it's obviously not those at fault.

Just a question ... you say your car is not cooling, but is it actually overheating? A faulty temperature sender unit (it screws into the engine block, usually..) can give an incorrect reading on your gauge.

If it is overheating - steam/you can feel the excess heat - is your radiator fan kicking in? Is your car overheating as soon as you drive it? Or overheating when stuck in traffic .. and the fan isn't kicking in..?

Other things that cause overheating which spring to mind include a blocked radiator and/or a collapsed radiator hose.

Hot coolant enters your radiator via the TOP hose and cools as it goes down the radiator, then back into the engine via the bottom hose. Check both top and bottom hose after the engine has warmed - sometimes a hose can become 'flat' and blocked.

Another thing that causes overheating is a burnt head gasket/cylinder head problem.

Switch the engine on and look at your coolant bottle - a continuous 'bubbling' indicates that exhaust gases are finding their way (via a burnt head gasket) into the cooling system.

Any oil in the coolant bottle also indicates cylinder head problems. Also check the oil dipstick. If coolant (because of a defective head gasket/head) has found its way into the oil system the oil on your dipstick may appear a creamy/greyish sludge.

May 21, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Car overheating


First confirm that the engine IS actually overheating - steam, no heat to the interior etc. Sometimes a temperature sensor will fail and give a misleading 'overheat' reading on gauge. For that matter sometimes the gauge can fail and give the same misleading reading. Check that the cooling fan comes on when the engine temperature starts to rise above 'normal'. If not check (in order) fan fuse, fan relay, fan sensor, fan. Real overheating is caused by a lack of coolant AND/OR lack of coolant flow. Modern cooling systems are 'closed'. In other words there should be little or no loss of coolant. If the level is significantly low you have a leak....either external or internal. With the coolant topped up to the correct level and the radiator cap on, run the engine and look for visible leaks...hoses, valves, radiator etc. Internal leaks, eg. head gasket will usually be accompanied by white exhaust smoke (steam), hard starting, rough running and bubbles in the expansion tank. Sometimes, though NOT always, you will find the engine oil has a milky look and/or engine oil will be mixed in with the coolant.

Aug 15, 2011 | Infiniti G35 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I Have a 1997 Pontiac Grand Prix, For months now my temperature gauge has been running hot to nearly 260 degrees. The car has never officially overheated although the fans do kick in, In the last few...


What's chances that the temperature gauge or sender itself is wrong?
Is the heat exceptionally hot? What temperature is the heater dicharge when the gauge reads 260?
I think that the sender is not expensive, try that. An auto parts store could get you an inexpensive dial gauge that you might be able to install in place of the sender.
Gary

Aug 02, 2011 | Pontiac Grand Prix Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

When idling my jeep overheats. The cooling fan is running and it speeds up when temperature goes up. The temperature gets close to 260 degrees and the engine tries to stall. when I start moving it cools...


At idling speed an engine does build up a lot of heat and the cooling fan will kick in. In slow moving traffic or traffic jams the temperature gauge can touch the red - particularly on hot days. The reason it cools down when you start moving is because of the air flow through the radiator.

Presumably there are no leaks from the cooling system otherwise you would have mentioned it. In normal circumstances the fan will not be running as you are driving at speed, as the air-flow through the radiator is sufficient to cool things. The fan only kicks in to get rid of excess heat - and this usually occurs at idling speed or after you have parked the car.

If the fan is running all the time as you drive, this points to either a fault in the fan switch, or the car is running too hot. presumably in normal driving the fan isn't running and the temperature gauge reads normal?

It is common - in stationary traffic many cars overheat (particularly big engined models) try to stall and 'cut out'. Restarting can be difficult until the engine cools down.

Is your car overheating in normal driving conditions or just at idle speed? Overheating in normal driving conditions can be caused by things like a failing water pump, blocked radiator, collapsed hose, faulty thermostat or, in the worst case scenario, cylinder head problems.

Overheating at idling speed is 'common'. Check your coolant level. If your car isn't using/losing coolant then there probably is no major problem. You can flush out the cooling system and refill with new coolant - and also check your radiator. Are the cooling fins crumbling with age? Or maybe they're partly clogged with insects and debris from the road? A blast with a hosepipe wil sort that out ..

The question is how much does your car overheat in normal driving? If it doesn't .. it appears as though you have nothing to worry about as such. Most cars have 2 speed fans... the 2nd faster stage kicks in at some point dependant on engine temperature. Perfectly normal.

Aug 14, 2010 | 2003 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Thermofans don't kick in, but temperature seems ok


Hello... You should not be concerned... This is normal... Also, normally you should not hear the thermostat. But the Fans don't normally turn on until about 100 degrees centigrade....

Good Luck

Apr 07, 2010 | 1989 Toyota Camry

2 Answers

Help with a Sharan 2.0 gl 1996 auto overheating?


Hi There,
Replace the Thermostat and let me know the results.

Mar 23, 2009 | 2001 Volkswagen Beetle

1 Answer

97 Grand Marquis Erratic Temp


Sounds like the thermostat may be sticking,Or the temp sensor is going out.Both very inexpensive.

Jan 10, 2009 | 1997 Mercury Grand Marquis

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