Question about 1987 Ford Bronco

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Front end alignment 1987 ford bronco

I adjusted the alignment on my 1987 ford bronco so the wheels are straight enough for trail rides. I wanted to know if there are any other adjustments besides the tie rods, or what my problem would be. / \ (This is how the tires look)

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  • Anonymous May 21, 2009

    How can I fix it?

  • marcdomanski May 21, 2009

    Thanx, How can I fix it? How much are parts? Any idea?

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  • 7 Answers

That is a camber problem. most likely Axle Pivot Bushings, or lower ball joints.

Posted on May 21, 2009

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Bmw 740i 1998 steering wheel isn't straight


When parts in the front end get worn out your adjustments in the front end change from there original settings giving you steering problems and changing steering wheel position. If you want it straight the correct way to do it is Get the front end checked out. Any worn parts should be replaced then have alignment done. While doing alignment there last step should be to center the steering wheel.

Sep 30, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Why is the steering wheel not straight as the car goes straight?


Because the car need a front-end alignment.
Here's how that works.
The steering wheel is attached to 2 tie rods (they go by different names sometimes).
These tie rods are then attached one to each front wheel.
There are at least 2, and sometimes 4 adjustments for these under the front of the car.
When someone does a front end "alignment". they will loosen all these joints and will set the wheel straight to match the direction of the car.
Over the years, these parts wear and the wheel gets crooked.
Be blessed.

Feb 18, 2013 | 2005 Lexus SC430

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How do i align a steering wheel on a 2002 astro van


If the steering wheel hasn't been removed and is just off center then the front end may need alignment to correctly get the steering wheel at center.

May 15, 2011 | 2002 Chevrolet Astro

2 Answers

I want to know how to fix the alignment on my 1995 honda accord ex.


Before making wheel alignment adjustment, perform the following checks:
  1. Tires should be equal in size and runout must not be excessive. Tires and wheels should be in balance, and inflated to manufacturer's specifications.

  2. Wheel bearings must be properly adjusted. Steering linkage and suspension must not have excessive looseness. Check for wear in tie rod ends and ball joints.
  3. Steering gear box must not have excessive play. Check and adjust to manufacturer's specifications.
  4. Vehicle must be at curb height with full fuel load and spare tire in vehicle. No extra load should be on vehicle.
  5. Vehicle must be level with floor and with suspension settled. Jounce front and rear of vehicle several times and allow it to settle to normal curb height.
  6. If steering wheel is not centered with front wheels in straight-ahead position, correct by shortening one tie rod adjusting sleeve and lengthening opposite sleeve equal amounts.
  7. Ensure wheel lug nuts are tightened to torque specifications
Ride Height Adjustment

Before adjusting alignment, check riding height. Riding height must be checked with vehicle on level floor and tires properly inflated. Passenger and luggage compartments must be unloaded. Bounce vehicle several times, and allow suspension to settle. Visually inspect vehicle from front to rear and from side to side for signs of abnormal height.
Measure riding height. See figure. Riding height between left and right sides of vehicle should vary less than 1′ (25.4 mm). If riding height is not within specification, check suspension components and repair or replace them as necessary.
Wheel Alignment Procedures

Honda recommends using commercially available computerized 4-wheel alignment equipment. Follow equipment manufacturer instructions to obtain vehicle alignment settings. Use following procedures for necessary adjustments.
Civic Camber Adjustment
Compare camber settings with vehicle manufacturer recommendations. If camber is incorrect, check for bent or damaged front suspension components. Replace faulty components. Recheck camber.
Civic Caster Adjustment
DO NOT use more than 2 shims. If more than 2 shims are required to adjust caster angle, check for bent or damaged suspension components.
Compare caster settings with vehicle manufacturer recommendations. If caster is incorrect, check for bent or damaged front suspension components. Replace faulty components. Recheck caster.
Civic Toe-In Adjustment

  1. Secure steering wheel in straight-ahead position. Measure front wheel toe-in. If adjustment is needed, loosen tie rod lock nuts. Turn both tie rods equally in the same direction until front wheels are in straight-ahead position and toe-in reading is correct. Tighten tie rod lock nuts. Reposition tie rod boots if twisted.
  2. Ensure parking brake is released. Check rear wheel toe-in. If adjustment is needed, hold adjusting bolt on rear compensator arm and loosen lock nut. See figure. Adjust rear toe-in by sliding rear control arm until rear toe-in is correct. Install NEW lock nut, and tighten it while holding adjusting bolt.
Wheel Alignment Specifications

  • Camber - Measurement in degrees.
    • Front: 0 (range -1 to 1)
    • Rear: 0.33 (range -1.33 to 0.67)
  • Caster - Measurement in degrees.
    • 1.17 (range 0.17 to 2.17)
  • Toe-In - Measurement in inches (mm).
    • Front: -0 (0)
    • Rear: 0.08 (2.0)
  • Toe-In - Measurement in degrees.
    • Front: 0.00 (range - 0.16 to 0.16)
  • Toe-Out On Turns - Measurement in degrees.
    • Inner: 41.00
    • Outer: 33.50
Torque Specifications Ft. Lbs (N.m)

  • Rear Control Arm Adjusting Bolt: 48 (65)
  • Spindle Nut: 136 (185)
  • Tie Rod Lock Nut: 41 (55)
  • Wheel Lug Nuts: 80 (108)
hope this helps you out.

May 09, 2011 | 1995 Honda Accord

1 Answer

1987 Bronco II. When four wheel drive is engaged. Front drivers side wheel makes a whining sound. Four wheel drive won't engage.


i would believe that u prob have a bad lock out, change it and u'll be good to go, take only couple minutes if you have the right allen wrench

Jan 16, 2011 | 1987 Ford Bronco II

1 Answer

STeering wheel is loose and noisy while steering. Sounds like something broke inside.


This might help to understand the steering linkage: REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Fig. 1: Steering linkage used on the Bronco and 4-wheel drive F-150 84928067.gif
Fig. 2: Steering linkage used on the 4-wheel drive F-350 84928070.gif
Fig. 3: Steering linkage used on F-Super Duty chassis/cab 84928071.gif
Pitman Arm EXCEPT F-SUPER DUTY STRIPPED CHASSIS AND MOTOR HOME CHASSIS
  1. Place the wheels in a straight-ahead position.
  2. Disconnect the drag link at the Pitman arm. You'll need a puller such as a tie rod end remover.
  3. Remove the Pitman arm-to-gear nut and washer.
  4. Matchmark the Pitman arm and gear housing for installation purposes.
  5. Using a 2-jawed puller, remove the Pitman arm from the gear.
  6. Installation is the reverse of removal. Align the matchmarks when installing the Pitman arm. Tighten the Pitman arm nut to 170-230 ft. lbs. (230-312 Nm); torque the drag link ball stud nut to 50-75 ft. lbs. (68-102 Nm), advancing the nut to align the cotter pin hole. Never back off the nut to align the hole.
F-SUPER DUTY STRIPPED CHASSIS MOTOR HOME CHASSIS
  1. Matchmark the Pitman arm and sector shaft.
  2. Disconnect the drag link from the Pitman arm.
  3. Remove the bolt and nut securing the Pitman arm to the sector shaft.
  4. Using a 2-jawed gear puller, remove the Pitman arm from the sector shaft. To install:
  5. Aligning the matchmarks, slide the Pitman arm onto the sector shaft. If the arm won't slide on easily, use a cold chisel to spread the separation. NEVER HAMMER THE ARM ONTO THE SHAFT! Hammering on the arm will damage the steering gear!
  6. Install the nut and bolt. Tighten the nut to 220-300 ft. lbs. (298-407 Nm).
  7. Connect the drag link.
Tie Rod and Drag Link EXCEPT RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE
  1. Place the wheels in a straight-ahead position.
  2. Remove the cotter pins and rust from the drag link and tie rod ball studs.
  3. Remove the drag link ball studs from the right-hand spindle and Pitman arm.
  4. Remove the tie rod ball studs from the left-hand spindle and drag link.
  5. Installation is the reverse of removal. Seat the studs in the tapered hole before tightening the nuts. This will avoid wrap-up of the rubber grommets during tightening of the nuts. Tighten the nuts to 70 ft. lbs. (95 Nm). Always use new cotter pins.
  6. Have the front end alignment checked.
RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE
  1. Raise and support the front end on jackstands.
  2. Place the wheels in the straight-ahead position.
  3. Remove the nuts connecting the drag link ball studs to the connecting rod and Pitman arm.
  4. Disconnect the drag link using a tie rod end remover.
  5. Loosen the bolts on the adjuster clamp. Count the number of turns it take to remove the drag link from the adjuster. To install:
  6. Installation is the reverse of the removal procedure. Install the drag link with the same number of turns it took to remove it. Make certain that the wheels remain in the straight-ahead position during installation. Seat the studs in the tapered hole before tightening the nuts. This will avoid wrap-up of the rubber grommets during tightening of the nuts. Tighten the adjuster clamp nuts to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm). Tighten the ball stud nuts to 75 ft. lbs. (102 Nm).
  7. Have the front end alignment checked.
Connecting Rod RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE
  1. Raise and support the front end on jackstands.
  2. Place the wheels in the straight-ahead position.
  3. Disconnect the connecting rod from the drag link by removing the nut and separating the two with a tie rod end remover.
  4. Loosen the bolts on the adjusting sleeve clamps. Count the number of turns it takes to remove the connecting rod from the connecting rod from the adjuster sleeve and remove the rod.
  5. Installation is the reverse of removal. Install the connecting rod the exact number of turns noted during removal. Tighten the tie rod nuts to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm); the ball stud nut to 75 ft. lbs. (102 Nm).
  6. Have the front end alignment checked.
Tie Rod Ends RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE Fig. 4: Remove the cotter pin from the castellated nut at the ball stud 88288p02.jpg
Fig. 5: Remove the nut from the ball stud 88288p03.jpg
Fig. 6: Use a tie rod end puller tool to remove the ball stud from the Pitman arm 88288p04.jpg
Fig. 7: Liquid correction fluid makes excellent paint to mark the threads of the tie rod end 88288p05.jpg
Fig. 8: For a more accurate reinstallation, you may measure the tie rod end prior to removal 88288p06.jpg
Fig. 9: After having loosened the nut, unscrew and remove the tie rod end 88288p07.jpg
  1. Raise and support the front end on jackstands.
  2. Place the wheels in a straight-ahead position.
  3. Remove the ball stud from the Pitman arm using a tie rod end remover. NOTE: Optional: paint a mark or measure the length of the tie rod end threads to ease reinstallation in as close to the original position as possible.
  4. Loosen the nuts on the adjusting sleeve clamp. Remove the ball stud from the adjuster, or the adjuster from the tie rod. Count the number of turns it takes to remove the sleeve from the tie rod or ball stud from the sleeve. To install:
  5. Install the sleeve on the tie rod, or the ball in the sleeve the same number of turns noted during removal. Make sure that the adjuster clamps are in the correct position, illustrated, and torque the clamp bolts to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm).
  6. Keep the wheels facing straight-ahead and install the ball studs. Tighten the nuts to 75 ft. lbs. (102 Nm). Use new cotter pins.
  7. Install the drag link and connecting rod.
  8. Have the front end alignment checked.
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Sep 18, 2010 | 1996 Ford F150 Regular Cab

1 Answer

Where is the fuse box on a 1987 ford bronco 2?


Under the steering wheel, the big panel below it, will have two twist tabs on the lower end of that panel, twist tabs and panel will come off, fuse box in back of that panel.

Aug 03, 2010 | 1987 Ford Bronco II

1 Answer

Did the 87 ford bronco come stock with a steering damper? Steering is all over the road and i noticed when i sarted looking around that i didnt see a steering stablizer shock.


NO THEY DID NOT COME WITH A DAMPER, IF U ARE ALL OVER THE ROAD YOU MOST LIKELY HAVE WORN PARTS OR FRONT END ALIGN ISSUES OR TIRE ISSUES, HAS ALL THIS BEEN CHECKED? LET ME KNOW.

Apr 19, 2010 | 1987 Ford Bronco

1 Answer

Wheel alignment for automobile


Hello. Wheel alignment is the adjustment of the front and rear wheels so that they are correctly inline with each other and pointing straight forward. If they point to the left or right the car will pull to that side of the road while being driven. The front wheels also need to be adjusted to ensure they are not too far forward and riding on the back of the tire, or not too far back and riding on the front of the tire. Lastly, all tires need to be checked to ensure they are not leaning too far in or out of their wheelwell, causing the tires to become prematurely bald. For most vehicles it can cost you $40-$120 depending where its done, plus any shim kits needed to adjust the wheel allignment back to factory specs. Most shops provide 2 or 4 wheel alignment, so always ensure that they perform a 4 wheel alignment. Always ask for the alignment test reports for both before and after the work is performed so you can see for yourself which were out of alignment. Pot holes, curb-hopping, railroad/railway tracks, etc. play a huge part in your vehicle alignment going bad. 4 tires on some cars can cost you $500-1600 to replace, but an alignment check every 2-4 years will only cost you a very small amount, saving you time and money.

Apr 03, 2009 | 2000 Mini Cooper

3 Answers

Wheel alignment


The main cause of steering wheel off-center is toe misalignment or rear axle misalignment. Toe can fall out of adjustment fairly easily as a result of daily driving, so you can imagine the effects of pounding it through 4WD trails on a regular basis.

Toe is designed to preload the steering linkage to remove play in the system. You can visualize toe angle from above; toe-in, or positive toe, is displayed when the leading edges of the tires are closer together than in the rear. Toe-out, or negative toe, is when the leading edges are farther apart. Zero toe is when wheels are pointed straight ahead and are parallel to each other. A slight amount of positive toe is preferred for most vehicles.

Improper toe angle isn't the only reason a steering wheel won't center. This phenomenon can also be caused by the steering linkage not being centered when toe was adjusted in the first place. This can be corrected by recentering the steering wheel and readjusting toe to proper specs. A bent steering arm or linkage component can also cause the steering wheel to be off-center. I've also seen this occur due to loose steering arm bolts. An off-center steering wheel contributes to tire wear because as the wheels are turned off dead center they turn toe out and increase tire scrubbing.

Sometimes an off-center steering wheel is accompanied by a wheel pull to one direction or the other and could be the result of a damaged component somewhere in the vehicle - a bent axlehousing could be throwing off the rear toe setting (rear toe setting is often overlooked). A bent frame or overly worn suspension bushings can also be the cause. If your wheel is off-center and also pulling, it can be as simple as incorrect tire pressure from side to side. Memory steer is another effect that is usually associated with an off-center steering wheel. This is when the steering wheel returns to an off-center position and can result in steering pull or drift after completing a turn. This can be caused by binding in the steering linkage as well as power steering system issues such as leaks or improper hydraulic pressure. Steering linkage bind occurs when proper geometry is not maintained in lifted vehicles.

Many 4x4s don't have factory provisions for adjusting caster and camber and rear toe and camber, but the front toe setting is easily adjusted. Toe is controlled by the steering linkage. By loosening the adjusters on the tie rod and shortening or lengthening the tie rod by turning the ends, toe angle can be adjusted. This should not be a substitute for regular professional wheel alignment jobs and is simply a tip that can be used to put off frequent trips to the alignment shop due to regular trips to the trail.
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Before determining toe angle and/or performing adjustments, it's a good idea to start the engine and turn the steering wheel side to side to relieve pressure in the system. Then, turn the wheels straight and shut off the engine. You should also roll the vehicle back and forth a few times between measurements.

Get someone to hold the other end of the measuring tape and measure the leading toe distance. This is the distance between the leading edges of the front tires. You'll compare the results to the distance between the trailing edges of the tires directly opposite from where you took the first measurement.

The higher number will indicate toe direction: higher number in leading edge indicates toe out; higher number at trailing edge displays toe in. Larger-than-stock tires require more positive toe for best results.

Once the necessary measurements are performed to determine what the current toe setting is, you can loosen the bolts on the tie-rod adjuster sleeve so that the tie-rod ends can be rotated. Don't forgot to tighten the adjusters when you're done as damage or injury could result.

The tie-rod ends thread into the tie rod. The ends can be threaded in or out of the tie rod to make the assembly longer or shorter. Longer creates more toe out; shorter toe in. Don't make huge adjustments all at once. It's best to adjust and measure a few times to achieve appropriate setting.
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I hope this helps you if you were looking to do a toe alignment yourself if you have decent knowledge of component location on a jeep.

Jan 30, 2009 | 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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