Question about 2002 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

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Overheat The car temperature is rising.(i.e overheating) I have changed the thermostart, serviced the break systems, washed the radiator still the temperature continue to rise. What would be the possible cause.

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Check or replace the tps, but first, maybe give the radiator a flush and check fluid level

Posted on May 19, 2009

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Car overheating causing fluid to come out of the reservoir


Change your thermostat. Ensure that your radiator fan is running at idle. See if your heat blows warm or not when the engine is warmed. if the heat is clod, then you have no water circulation in your engine. either the thermostat isnt opening up, or there is a blockage in your cooling system.

Jan 11, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

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Why did my 2011 DTS Cadillac overheat?


An overheated engine can be caused by anything that decreases the cooling system's ability to absorb, transport and dissipate heat; therefore engines can overheat for a variety of reasons. Let's take a look at some of the most common causes.
Cooling System Leaks
This is the primary cause of engine overheating. Possible leak points include hoses, the radiator, water pump, thermostat housing, heater core, head gasket, freeze plugs, automatic transmission oil cooler, cylinder heads and block. Perform a pressure test. A leak-free system should hold pressure for at least one minute.
Wrong Coolant Concentration
Be sure to use the coolant recommended by your vehicle's manufacturer. The wrong type of coolant and/or mixing the incorrect concentration of coolant and distilled water can also result in engine overheating. The best bet is to perform a complete flush and fill.
Bad Thermostat
A thermostat is a heat-sensitive valve that opens and closes in response to engine temperature. Heated engine coolant passes through to the radiator when the thermostat is in the open position. In the closed position, it prevents the flow of coolant to speed up the warming of a cold engine. When the thermostat gets stuck in the closed position, coolant stays in the engine and quickly becomes overheated, resulting in engine overheating.
Blocked Coolant Passageways
Rust, dirt and sediment can all block or greatly impede the flow of coolant through the cooling system. This can limit the system's ability to control engine temperature, which may result in higher operating temperatures and engine overheating. Once again, a flush and fill is recommended to remove debris.
Faulty Radiator
By passing through a series of tubes and fins, coolant temperature is reduced in the radiator. Leaks and clogging are some of the most common causes of radiator failure. Any disruption in the radiator's function can lead to elevated engine temperature and overheating.
Worn/Burst Hoses
A hose that contains visual cracks or holes, or has burst will result in leaks and disrupt the flow of engine coolant. This can result in overheating.
Bad Radiator Fan
A fan blows air across the radiator fins to assist in reducing the temperature of the coolant. A fan that wobbles, spins freely when the engine is off, or has broken shrouds will not be able to reduce the temperature to proper level, thus possibly resulting in engine overheating.
Loose or Broken Belt
A belt is often the driving link that turns the water pump at the correct speed for proper coolant flow through the cooling system. If a belt is loose or broken, it cannot maintain the proper speed, thus resulting in poor coolant flow and ultimately, engine overheating.
Faulty Water Pump
Known as the 'heart' of the cooling system, the water pump is responsible for pressurizing and propelling engine coolant through the cooling system. Any malfunction of the water pump, including eroded impeller vanes, seepage or wobble in the pump shaft, can prevent adequate coolant flow and result in engine overheating.

Oct 13, 2016 | 2011 Cadillac DTS

1 Answer

How do i find out whats causing my car to overheat


How to Troubleshoot an Overheating Engine By Deanna Sclar from Auto Repair For Dummies, 2nd Edition
1 of 9 in Series: The Essentials of Checking and Maintaining Your Vehicle's Cooling System The first sign of a vehicle overheating is either when the needle on the temperature gauge pushes its way into the ominous red zone or the "Check Engine" or "Temperature" malfunction indicator light on the dashboard casts a sinister glow. Left alone, the liquid in the radiator eventually boils over, and steam rolls out from under the hood.
If your vehicle overheats often and constantly loses coolant, the problem may be leaks in your cooling system. If your vehicle overheats in normal weather and traffic, you may need to add liquid to the system, replace the thermostat, adjust or replace the accessory belt, or check the water pump.
The first thing to check if your vehicle overheats often is the pressure cap. Sometimes the gasket on the cap deteriorates and lets pressure escape, which causes the cooling system to malfunction. Most service stations can test your cap for you and tell you whether it's in good condition.
Some overheating problems aren't related to the cooling system at all. Here are some other circumstances that can cause a vehicle to overheat:
  • Late timing: If your ignition system is malfunctioning, late timing may be causing your vehicle to overheat because the spark plugs are firing the fuel/air mixture after the piston moves back down from the top of its stroke. Late timing alone doesn't cause an engine to overheat by more than a few degrees, but when coupled with other problems, it can bring the engine temperature to a critical point. Have a service facility place your vehicle on an electronic diagnostic machine to check your timing and adjust it if necessary.
  • Plugged radiator: Because plugged radiators cut down on the system's liquid circulation, the system can't cool efficiently. The remedy is to have a radiator specialist remove and inspect the radiator. If you're lucky, just steam-cleaning the radiator does the job; if you're not, the solution may be more expensive.
  • Slipping accessory belt: If you can see and reach the accessory belt that drives the water pump, check to be sure that there's no more than about 1?2 inch of give. If the belt seems loose or frayed, you can try to replace it. If you can't do the job, have a professional deal with it.
  • Collapsing bottom radiator hose: Occasionally, a bottom radiator hose begins to collapse under the vacuum that the water pump creates, and the impaired circulation causes overheating.
  • Low oil level: A vehicle that's low on oil tends to overheat because the oil removes from 75 to 80 percent of the "waste heat" in your engine (in addition to doing its other job of cushioning the moving engine parts).
If you're one quart low in oil and your vehicle holds five quarts, the oil will carry away 20 percent less heat than it should.
Under normal circumstances, you can prevent overheating by checking the level of liquid in the system and maintaining it properly.

How to Troubleshoot an Overheating Engine

5 Ways to Tell Your Car is Overheating

My Car is Overheating What Could be Wrong What Do Do

Jul 30, 2015 | 2004 Kia Sedona EX

1 Answer

My golf 4 is overheating l tried to change the thermo switch and the thermostart but there is no change


Make sure you have your coolent full, fill at radiator not the plastic jug after any coolent system repairs. Could be your waterpump is faulty.

Dec 12, 2013 | 2002 Volkswagen Golf

1 Answer

On a 2000 toyota celica gt, the engine will overheat when driving only, what can cause this?


Have you checked the engine temperature when the gauge shows fully high if it is true message and not lying and the problem is the temperature gauge? Since this happened stop the car open the bonnet touch the radiator hoses and even with off running engine touch the vents of the radiator to all surface and see it the temperature is everywhere the same.

Sep 15, 2012 | 2001 Toyota Celica

1 Answer

Temperature rises,is the water pump damage?


before to suspect water pump not working. need to check radiator cup, if temperature rise on stop. engine thermostat is the other factor of overheat and notice the temperature begin to rise from start up. leaks from radiator is the other factor,coolant is not enough to support the system.

Aug 21, 2012 | Suzuki Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Overheating


bendu
check the valve,crank and injection pump timing well
change engine thermostart, check the turbo unit ,
. viscos and belt tension

Jun 25, 2012 | 2005 Toyota LandCruiser Prado

2 Answers

Over heating


When your temperature gauge reaches "H' it may too late to prevent a major breakdown. Knowing the symptoms of an overheated car and how they occur may be the difference between being inconvenienced and incapacitated.
Identification:---Other than a low oil level or low oil pressure light, there is not a more significant part of a car's instrumentation than a rising temperature gauge or a glowing "Hot" light. These lights are really the only confirmation a driver has that his car is really overheating. It is the identification of the symptoms of an overheating car that enable the motorist to avert a badly damaged engine. Overheating is always a traumatic event for a car's engine, which makes the early identification of the symptom an important addition to the informed motorist's tool kit.
Stuck Thermostat:--The car's thermostat is a valve that controls coolant flow from the engine block to the radiator. When the engine is cold the thermostat remains closed so that the coolant can reach operating temperature quicker and also provide heat to the passenger's compartment. The thermostat has a spring on it that moves depending on coolant temperature causing the thermostat to open. Sometimes the thermostat fails to open thus restricting coolant flow to the radiator where it would be cooled down. This condition is often the cause of overheating. The symptoms of this cause would be a rising temperature gauge and possibly the loss of heat inside the car.
Restricted Radiator:---A car's radiator will have thousands of gallons of coolant passing through in its lifetime. Along with the coolant comes particulate matter in the form of corrosion breaking loose from various parts of the car's cooling system. These contaminates collect in the tubes of the radiator reducing its efficiency. Extensive "plugging" in the radiator will cause the car to overheat. The symptom of this condition would be a rising temperature gauge which goes up when you accelerate.
Coolant Loss:--A car's cooling system is a closed loop system. You are not supposed to lose coolant. Sufficient coolant loss will cause the engine to run hot because engine is heating less coolant to higher temperatures. The symptom of overheating induced by coolant loss would be a pool of coolant on the pavement when the leak is external. Steam under the hood as the lost coolant hits hot parts of the engine, or a rising temperature gauge in the case of a undetectable engine related leak. Of course, the gauge would also go up if the leaks were not detected. Deteriorated Water Pump:--Cars use a belt driven pump to push the water and coolant mixture through the cooling system. This part is called the water pump. Rarely the impeller that draws the coolant through the pump will rust away making it impossible to push any through the system. If this occurs the temperature gauge will climb and coolant will boil over in the radiator. Inoperable Fan:----Most cooling fans are electrically driven. Some are driven by fan belts. If a belt breaks or the electric supply to the fan is interrupted overheating may result. Electric fans are tuned on thermostatically when needed. When the car runs at idle for extended periods or the weather is extremely hot, a failed fan will cause overheating otherwise it serves as a standby assist to the rest of the cooling system. In stress conditions an inoperable fan will cause the temperature gauge to rise. This will help. Thanks please keep updated.please please do rate the solution positively .thank you for using fixya

Mar 19, 2010 | 2001 Hyundai Accent

1 Answer

OVERHEATING, engine temperature rises up?


think impeller drive is slipping on the drive in the water pump

Dec 31, 2009 | 2000 Honda Civic

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