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How do you test yoir voltage regulator in 2003 mazda 6 i 2.3l

Over charging or its the alternator

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  • Melissa Beach
    Melissa Beach Dec 30, 2013

    all warning service lights came on no power to stereo hearter etc car died wouldnt start checked cables positive wwas loose tightened and then pushed started up fluttered with no power died so hrs later towed it home carged battery and reconnected started fine research stated suggustions of over charging voltage regulator the alternator or the coil/ gauge thing i tested the alternator by pulling off the negative cable while stil running and the car died so idk isnt there diginositics test by turning your key semi over a certain number ot times and the turn it all the way over anf then counting the number of dings equals the entry for the error codes

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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Voltage regulators are tested with a volt meter and an amp meter and is done by a qualified auto electrician. so instead of running the risk of damaging the alternator rectifier and regulator have it done professionally

Posted on Dec 30, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: 2003 VW Jetta Charging problem

problem is that the voltage regulators on the 1.8t which I am sure is the same on the TDI alternator....is that they may work fine when they are cold....but once they warm up is when they start acting up and causing problems. I assume is has to do with some resistor over heating. This is just a common problem noticed by most people over at VWvortex.com.
So you can take your alternator to get tested but if it is tested cold then well it may appear to be working ok. When in reality it is broken. Trust me...it is a cheap enough part and easy enough to fix to not just try it. Some can even change the regulator without taking the alternator out. If you have small enough hands I can see it being done.

Posted on Feb 20, 2009

  • 92 Answers

SOURCE: how to jump terminals to test external voltage regulator

Jump terminals A to F and the alternator should full field and charge. If it charges then replace the regulator. if it doesn't charge replace the alternator. I remember the terminals by thinking of the word AIR FORCE .

Posted on Apr 03, 2010

jturcotte
  • 8202 Answers

SOURCE: I have a 2003 kia spectra 1.8 liter. The

Hi, there are 3 fuses the the alternator needs to charge the battery. These may be inside the car or in a box in the engine compartment. They are named IG1, ECU, and ALT. If you have trouble finding them, please get back to me.

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Posted on May 08, 2011

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I have 2003 Saturn Ion and I have bought a new


test the battery voltage while the engine is running, (you'll have to jump it again)
if you know the battery, voltage regulator and alternator are good, you may have to check all the fuse-able links on the car, all the vehicle grounds, and the fuses and relays.
if you put your battery on charge until it is fully charged and let the car sit over night and it is dead, either the battery is internally shorted or the vehicle is drawing far to much current and each circuit tested to find the short.

Oct 01, 2014 | 2003 Saturn ION

1 Answer

Voltage regulator 2003 buick lesabre


The voltage regulator is inside the alternator.
So if the alternator is good as you say, the regulator is too.
I suggested you check the wiring on the car.

Dec 23, 2012 | Buick LeSabre Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2nd newly rebuilt alternator burning out.


Due to the nature of the battery technology used with vehicles the alternator is mostly incapable of charging the battery. The car alternator is designed to keep a fully charged battery fully charged and to provide all the power for the car equipment.

The alternator charge rate is regulated by a voltage regulator. Because the alternator output is connected to the battery, the alternator and battery voltage will be the same and the voltage regulator monitors that voltage.

The lower the battery voltage the more output the alternator will produce in order to correct the situation but because a lead acid battery has a high internal resistance to accepting a charge the terminal voltage will quickly rise to the alternator regulated voltage and fool the alternator into thinking the battery is fully charged when the output will drop to the order of just a couple of amps.

Switch on the headlights or a similar load that will lower the battery voltage and the alternator will increase it's output again - but only by the amount of current the headlamps or other load is consuming.
It matters not what the alternator rated maximum output is, it is designed to provide only the necessary current and no more.

The only time an alternator should ever need to produce maximum output is when on a dedicated testbed and then only for a short duration to avoid damaging the unit. Testing the current output on a modern vehicle is not recommended except for the regulated voltage testing and a rule-of-thumb output test where all equipment is switched on and the engine speed raised while the battery voltage is monitored.

Most modern alternators use an internal voltage regulator but a few systems use a separate voltage regulator. No alternator rebuild would be complete without a regulator test and probably a new or replacement regulator, which is where the majority of charging system problems are, or the brush gear.
Assuming the wiring is ok, no alternator should suffer any harm if the voltage regulator and auxilliary diodes (if fitted) are in good order though fitting a defective or a discharged battery can cause it to overheat and be damaged.

The alternator usually just about stops producing an output when the battery voltage is in the region of 14.5/14.8 volts.
Your description indicates the voltage regulator is not working correctly - unless 40 amps was being consumed by the car equipment the alternator should not have been producing 40 amps.. I suggest you also have your battery tested

May 12, 2017 | 1988 Acura Legend

1 Answer

Alternator


Vehicles: any failing to keep its battery charged.

A vehicle unable to charge its own battery has one of 4 problems:
(a) alternator failure
(b) voltage regulator failure
(c) battery failure
(d) wiring problem between battery and alternator/voltage regulator.

One most modern vehicles (including 2002 Lexus RX300 - 2WD and AWD), the voltage regulator is an integral component of the alternator and is not separately serviceable.

In the US, one can get a free "charging system diagnosis" from the popular auto parts chains: AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts & Pep Boys. You needn't remove any parts from the car to get this diagnostic, since they can attach a diagnostic meter to the charging system in the parking lot. This diagnostic aid will tell you exactly which component has failed - battery, alternator or voltage regulator.

In case the vehicle is immobile, one can DIY (do it yourself) the diagnosis.
(a) inspect the wiring for corrosion/loose connections/loose connectors/etc.
(b) check alternator belt/pulley - if drive belt is properly turning the alternator pulley (no slippage/misrouting/etc.), then the mechanical tests are complete, and you'll need to continue testing the electrical performance of the charging system components.
(c) first component to test: battery
DIY test 1: remove battery from car and put battery on a 120VAC automotive battery charger and charge it fully (or just check it in the car with motor off, since the car's charging system is a type of automotive battery charger).
test parameter: a fully charged lead-acid automotive battery should read 12.45 volts on a VOM/DMM
DIY test 2: disassemble battery out of car after driving it to one of the auto parts chain stores (Advance/AutoZone/Pep Boys) for a free battery test. These testers will test the battery under load, which is not possible with just a DMM.
(d) if wiring is good, and battery tests good under load, then
the failed component is the alternator/voltage regulator - by process of elimination.
(e) DIY test 3: direct alternator/voltage regulator test (car must start and idle successfully to perform this test)
Start the car, and put a VOM/DMM across the terminals of the battery. Since the car is running, you'll be reading the output voltage of the alternator and not the output voltage of the battery. The acceptable ranges for alternator/voltage regulator output are:

ALTERNATOR CHARGING VOLTAGE

Most alternators that are charging properly should produce a voltage of about 13.8 to 14.2 volts at idle with the lights and accessories off. Always refer to the vehicle manufacturer's specifications. Many Asian vehicles, for example, have higher charging voltages of around 15 volts.

When the engine is first started, the charging voltage should rise quickly to about two volts above base battery voltage, then taper off, leveling out at the specified voltage.

The exact charging voltage will vary according to the battery's state of charge, the load on the vehicle's electrical system, and temperature. The lower the temperature the higher the charging voltage, and the higher the temperature the lower the charging voltage. The "normal" charging voltage on a typical application might be 13.9 to 15.1 volts at 77 degrees F. But at 20 degrees F. below zero, the charging voltage might be 14.9 to 15.8 volts. On a hot engine on a hot day, the normal charging voltage might drop to 13.5 to 14.3 volts.

Here are the full specs for installation of the 2002 Lexus RX300 alternator - you may be able to check these specs yourself (with a torque wrench), or pass them along to your mechanic.

Note: the VIN 8th digit should be "F" for the 2002 Lexus RX300 (2WD & AWD)

2002 Lexus RX300 (2WD and AWD) - 3.0L Engine, VIN "F" SFI DOHC

Alternator

Drive belt. Tension the belt to 170-180 lbs. for a new belt or 95-135 lbs. for a used belt.
Adjusting alternator lockbolt. Tighten the bolt to 13 ft.-lbs. (18 Nm).
Alternator pivot bolt. Tighten the bolt to 41 ft.-lbs. (56 Nm).

Glossary of acronyms
--------------------------------
DIY = do it yourself
DMM = Digital Multimeter
DOHC = Dual Overhead Cam
SFI = Sequential Fuel Injection
VOM = Volt Ohmmeter

References
----------------
How to test a Car Alternator - todayifoundout.com

Alternator & Charging System Checks - aa1car.com

Dec 26, 2011 | 2002 Lexus RX 300

1 Answer

What does the battery warning light mean on my 2003 Mazda Protege? Someone stole my manual out of my glove box so I can't look it up.


Hi,
That battery light on your instrument panel means the battery is discharging and the alternator does not charging the battery.
Better check your engine, the alternator belt might have been cut off or already missing.
The other one will be is to check the battery terminal if it is properly connected in the battery poles.
If all these are still intact, the problem would be the alternator itself. You have to bring your car to nearest garage to check the charging( voltage ) output of that alternator something might have been broken inside it. Usually the parts inside are the rectifier diode, IC regulator, and the carbon brush.
Hope that helps you out.
Thanks for asking FixYa!

Jul 19, 2011 | 2003 Mazda Protege

4 Answers

I have a 2003 kia spectra 1.8 liter. The alternator isn't charging the battery but when I took it off and had it tested 3 times it passed every time. The belt is tight enough and I replaced the plug...


Hi, there are 3 fuses the the alternator needs to charge the battery. These may be inside the car or in a box in the engine compartment. They are named IG1, ECU, and ALT. If you have trouble finding them, please get back to me.

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May 08, 2011 | 2003 Kia Spectra

1 Answer

03 Mazda Tribute's charging indicator light begins flashing on and off when engine reaches 1200 rpm and becomes contineously on at and above 1500 rpm. With engine idling or decelerating to below 1200 rpm...


It may be that the light is being tripped due to an "over voltage" condition. The faster you spin the alternator/engine the higher the voltage output of the alternator. I would test the voltage coming out of the alternator. It should be at about 14.3v or so max. If it gets into the 16v+ range when you increase the engine RPM then the voltage regulator has failed and needs to be replaced.

Feb 03, 2011 | 2003 Mazda Tribute

1 Answer

The computer in our 2003 Ford focus is not having the alternator charge the battery . we have had all things tested ie.. alternator,battery,all the wires..they say it is the computer, not sure if we should...


sounds to me like you have a bad voltage regulator. The voltage regulator will shut off the flow of juice to the battery if it exceeds a level, usually 14.5 volts. So if the alternator is over charging then the voltage regulator will shut off the flow to keep your battery form dying completely and having to be replaced. Now a days the regulator is located in the alternator.

that was your education for the day. :)

If they only tested the charge the alternator puts out and it passed they most likely bypassed the voltage regulator. If the voltage regulator is bad then you will still need a new alternator.
follow the link below and read the full field testing portion for a better explanation if you dont understand my explanation.

anything else? just post it :)

http://books.google.com/books?id=3q85p56_PxIC&pg=PA84&lpg=PA84&dq=test+voltage+regulator+inside+alternator&source=bl&ots=neLFU7USZK&sig=fmzJ2GjbxqULa9pU2UHylJahYS0&hl=en&ei=r9bySvXhNo2Xtge89omuAw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CBIQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=test%20voltage%20regulator%20inside%20alternator&f=false

Nov 04, 2009 | 2005 Ford Focus

1 Answer

Battery dosn't charge, alternator/voltage adapter test's good.


Did you test the Alternator on or off the truck? It might be a problem with the control system to the Alternator. The regulator need a battery feed to work, It is usually ran through an alternator fuse.

Mar 11, 2009 | 2005 Mazda 6

1 Answer

Mazda etude alternator genarting excessive heat


1st off you would give everything a good visual examination. Look for loose alternator belt. Also look for wires that could have become disconnected or cut that leads to the alternator.

Then you would hook up a volt meter to the battery cables and check the voltage.
After this you would start the engine and recheck the voltage. The voltage on a charged battery should read around 12.5 volts. While the engine is running turn on a few accesories and speed up the idle a little the voltage should read around 14.5 volts.

If the voltage does not increase suspect either a faulty alternator or regulator.

Sep 09, 2008 | 1999 Mazda 626

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