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No heat engine overheating

Battery light went on and then noticed no heat coming from blowing air.Engine overheating although lots of coolant.

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  • Kia Master
  • 3,103 Answers

Water pump out.. needs changed..

Posted on Dec 28, 2013

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6 Suggested Answers

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  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 26 Answers

SOURCE: engine is over heating and blowing air into coolant resivor and boiling coolant

1. Do you have a cooling fan system for your car, if you have , please check it, sometimes due to the wire overheated short problem and fan doesn’t work and cause the engine over heat.

2. If the head gasket leaking, you can check you oil steak see if there is white steam oil bubbling ,if the oil has steam and the radiator has oil mixed with coolant , that means the head gasket leaking.

Posted on Jun 24, 2008

plopit40
  • 16 Answers

SOURCE: temperature gauge indicates overheating, but engine not overheating, coolant being push into reservoir.

hi my name is brad i see you are haveing a problem and i think i might know the problem. if you have done all of that to your car and it still over heating you might have a blown head gasket one way to check is to pull your thermostat out and fill your coolant leaving the cap off then start you car let it rrun a few minutes and if you see bubbles the radiator its the head gasket even though you wont have coolant in your oil or out the tail pipe. if you check that and ther is no bubbles i have one other spot for you to check ( dont know if you have the 1.5 or 1.6 sohc ) but if you have the 1.6 sohc with the mpfi you should check on the throttle body at the idle air control valve(IAC) you will see two small line`s that have coolant some times on hondas with high millage the line will fill with crud and that can cause a problem.. if you have any other honda needs please let me know

Brad Ross

Posted on Nov 15, 2008

  • 651 Answers

SOURCE: 2002 KIA Sedona Overheating

most likely, replace thermostat .

Posted on Apr 14, 2009

Nomodo4u
  • 863 Answers

SOURCE: Dodge 2002 Grand Caravan V6 3.3 engine overheating/no cabin heat.

Replace the bad radiator hose first.  Second- get you special formulated anti-freeze dye from the auto store and pour it into the radiator.  Third- make sure you got all the air pockets out of your system, cause the coolant system won't work with air pockets in it.  Fourth- Check for leaks by looking for the colored dye.  If it's not the radiator hose, then could possibly be a pin hole in your radiator.  Would suggest replacing all the radiator hoses at the same time while you got the coolant system disconnected, cause you don't want to have to come back and replace another hose in a few months.

Posted on Nov 06, 2009

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Smartbuyer
  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: heater blowing cold air

My 05 sentra with 79k miles heat will warm up and then get cold after a mile of driving, we have tried to get the air pocket out, the mechanic stated he thought it could be a blown head gasket, another mechanic said it was a bad heater core. Any advice would be appreciated.

Posted on Dec 05, 2009

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1 Answer

Why is the temperature light keep coming on and the gauge keep going up and down?


Temperature Warning Light is on Inspection Service How this system works: With the exception of older, air-cooled vehicles, cars rely on a liquid called coolant (or antifreeze) to keep the engine at an optimal temperature. Coolant is a mixture of water and ethylene glycol, and it circulates around the engine block and absorbs excess heat, which keeps the engine from overheating. The coolant converts that heat to air in the radiator, and then the air is emitted, at which time the coolant is ready to absorb more heat. Without coolant, the engine would quickly ruin itself with its own heat production. Common reasons for this to happen:
  • Coolant is low or weak: The most common culprit when an engine overheats is low or weak coolant. If your car doesn't have enough coolant, then it can't absorb enough heat. While your car will naturally lose small amounts of coolant over the years, a leak is the most likely cause of low coolant levels.The proper ratio of coolant to water can also get distorted, resulting in a problem. Too little or even too much antifreeze can dramatically lower the boiling point of the coolant. A proper ratio of antifreeze to water is 50/50 to 60/40, depending on the vehicle.
  • Broken radiator fan shroud: The radiator fan shroud directs the airflow across the radiator so the air can absorb the coolant's heat. When the fan shroud breaks or becomes dislodged, air fails to enter the radiator, and the coolant will no longer have a place to direct the transfer of heat.
  • Broken or missing air dam: Along with the shroud, some vehicles have an air dam (or deflector) underneath the vehicle. If this is broken or missing then the air can pass underneath the vehicle but not also through the radiator, which will cause overheating. These air dams are essential in newer vehicles, as they force the air through the fan shroud.
  • Faulty coolant temperature sensor: The temperature sensor takes constant readings of the coolant temperature and sends that information to the engine control unit. Based on the temperature of the coolant, the engine control unit adjusts the ignition timing, the fuel injector pulse, and the operation of the electric cooling fan.
  • Bad water pump: The water pump is responsible for keeping the coolant cycling throughout the engine. After the coolant transfers its heat energy to the air, the water pump recirculates it around the engine so that it can absorb more heat. The most common water pump problems are a leaking pump, bad bearings, or an impeller that has rotted away due to a low coolant ratio.
  • Stuck thermostat: The thermostat acts as a dam for the coolant. When the engine first turns on, and it is still cold, the thermostat keeps the coolant from circulating, which allows the engine to warm up as quickly as possible. Once the engine has reached its operating temperature, the thermostat opens and allows the coolant to circulate. A stuck thermometer may stay permanently sealed and therefore keep the coolant from reaching the engine block.
  • The thermostat may also stick open. This will not usually result in overheating, but it will waste gas.
  • Broken engine cooling fan: The engine has a cooling fan that is deployed when the coolant needs some extra help. When the coolant temperature sensor notices that the coolant temperature is getting too high, the engine control unit (on newer vehicles) will initiate the cooling fan to reduce the temperature.
  • Broken thermostatic fan clutch: Older vehicles use a thermostatic fan clutch to engage the engine cooling fan, which is mounted to the fan blades. The fan clutch uses a bi-metallic spring that tightens when the temperature increases. This acts as a "high speed" option for the fan, and when engaged, it draws more air across the radiator.
  • Blown head gasket: The head gaskets sit between the engine block and the cylinder heads, and keep coolant from entering the engine's oil and combustion chamber. When a gasket blows and coolant seeps in, the issue is not only that the engine will overheat, but also that damage may be done to the catalytic converter and oxygen sensors due to contamination from the coolant. What to expect: A top-rated mobile mechanic will come to your home or office to determine the cause of the temperature warning light turning on and the source of the overheating, and will then provide a detailed inspection report that includes the scope and cost of the necessary repairs. How important is this service? An overheating engine is extremely dangerous. It is not safe to drive a vehicle with an overheating engine, or you may ruin the engine completely and put yourself at risk. As soon as you notice the light come on, pull over. If there is no place to safely pull over, turn off your radio and other electrical units, and turn your heat on high (this will funnel some of the hot engine air into the cabin). As soon as you can safely pull over, do so, and then book one of our mechanics to perform an inspection.

Sep 30, 2016 | 2008 Pontiac G6

1 Answer

1999 Buick Lesabre started idling rough yesterday and it overheated for about a miuite. Heat started blowing cold air. Checked coolant, almost empty, refilled, took several starts and accelerations to get...


You have damaged the engine, the smoke is from burning coolant in the engine due to a blown leaking cylinder head gasket or gaskets. Do not drive this or you will completely destroy the engine.

Jun 23, 2017 | Buick Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Battery light went on and then noticed no heat coming from blowing air.Engine overheating and coolant all over engine. Also been hearing a sqeel noise that would come an go prior, one day it lasted a while...


And came back with a vengeance. Is it the water pump? Time for some coolant system service. And a new belt, thermostat...50/50 mix of antifreeze. It should all come back good. Karma! lol

Feb 03, 2014 | Jeep Liberty Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Seem to be losing coolant cant see leak now engine runs rough


Sounds like a leaking head gasket. The coolant could be leaking into a cylinder and is being burned out the exhaust.

Jan 19, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

1998 beetle overheating and heat doesnt work


To start with, the cooling system is a sealed system, so anytime you have to add coolant it went somewhere. Either an external leak onto the ground, or an engine leak were the engine is burning it.
If you added coolant and the heater is not working all the time, the system could have air pockets which would need to be expelled.

Jan 04, 2013 | 1998 Volkswagen Beetle

1 Answer

A/c not changing to heat


The engine is overheating! Check the coolant level to be sure it is full. Other checks will then be to make sure the water pump is working. With the engine overheating, you are not getting coolant moving through the engine, or your heater core for that matter. If the coolant level is good, I would go to the water pump/thermostat next.

Dec 10, 2011 | 2001 Oldsmobile Aurora

1 Answer

After a few minutes of driving the engine begins to overheat. The engine signal and the warning cooling light both come on. Although the engine temperature is 90 degrees, the indoor heating fan is still...


There could be 3 possible problems here.

If the dashboard is saying the engine is overheating at 90 degrees and there is still cold air coming through then the thermostat could be faulty. I would suggest that you remove the thermostat and place it in a beaker of boiling water. If the top begins to open as the temperature rises, then it is fine. If not, then the thermostat will need to be replaced.

If the thermostat is fine, I would then suggest that you check your coolant levels, the coolant pressure or make sure there isn't a crack in the radiator. If there isn't enough coolant in the system then it won't perform to its highest standards. If the coolant pressure is too low, then it won't be able to cool high temperatures, although 90 degrees isn't very high for the engine to overheat. If your radiator has a crack in it then it will be leaking coolant which would explain a low coolant level and loss of pressure.

A third problem could be air getting into the heating system which will cause air to get trapped in the radiator. This would stop the normal flow of coolant. So now I would suggest checking the cylinder head gasket and do a pressure test to see if there is any air getting into the system.

Feb 02, 2011 | 2002 Volkswagen Golf

1 Answer

A/C hot and cold air....


Technical Information: When the engine overheats (goes above 220 to 230 degrees), the ECM (Engine Contro Module) will disable the AC (won't let the compressor engage). This is a safety feature of the EMS (Engine Management System) to reduce potential damage to the engine from an overheat condition. Check your coolant level in the radiator & reseviore -- Low coolant level can produce the symptom you describe -- if low, top them off. Inspect your radiator hoses/cooling system for any signs of leakage (crusty deposits of dried coolant). Wherever you find this, that's where it's leaking. If you don't find any signs of leakage, replace the thermostat (& gasket if required (as a precaution) anyway. When the engine overheats, both cooling fans should come ON HIGH! If they aren't/don't, something's wrong and you need to find the cause. Every two to three years the cooling system should be flushed and inspected to ensure proper operation/condition and system protection. Overheating can seriously damage the engine. $$$$. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Jun 06, 2009 | Hyundai Motor 2002 Elantra

3 Answers

Chevy S10 overheated, now heat doesn't work, leaking coolant


When an engine is overheating and then the temp drops on the guage, it's usually a sign that the coolant is not touching the temp sensor. There's no coolant in the engine. Putting water in the overflow tank won't solve this. Take the radiator cap off after the engine cools and put coolant in the radiator. you might have to crank the engine and do this several times, as the engine can develop air pockets that won't allow the coolant to travel inside the engine. If you don't see any leaks, and it still uses coolant, you've probably got a blown head gasket. Check for water on the plugs, check cylinder compression. If it slowly uses coolant, try putting a large box of pepper in the radiator or some of that radiator seal copper flakes.

Dec 22, 2008 | 2001 Chevrolet S-10

1 Answer

Coolant Leak in 1997 Saturn SL1


if there is no heat coming from the vents i would bleed the coolant system for air, usually trapped air in the system will cause this lack of heat.

Nov 25, 2008 | 1997 Saturn SL

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