Question about Chevrolet Malibu

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Transmission fluid flushing

I have 00 focus. I have read about two methods for atx fluid flush.

Method 1:

Disconnect return line at the cooler, start the engine, put it in drive, and let the fluid drain from return line. Once most of the fluid has drained out, turn the engine off, reconnect line, lower the pan, put new filter and gasket, bolt the pan back and fill it up with new atx fluid.

Q. Once all the fluid is drained, the tranny will have no fluid. Will it cause damage to the tranny?

Method 2:

Lower the pan, put the new filter and gasket, bolt the pan back and fill it up with new atx fluid. Then disconnect return line at the cooler, start the engine, put it in drive, let about a quart of fluid drain from return line, stop the engine and add quart of new oil. Repeat draining and adding until you see new fluid coming out of return line.

Q. If your fluid isn't much discolored but U are at the recommended mileage of fluid change, how can U tell if all old fluid is out of torque converter?

Posted by on

  • sh4664 May 18, 2009

    this isn't the first time, I have been changing fluid at regular intervals. Never flushed it and wanted to know if Method 1 will cause any tranny damage. here is the link that shows method 1 with pictures.

    http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/showt...

    all other forums talk about method 2, but they assume your old fluid is considerably darker than

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In normal situations people do not flush their trannys. Your would normally just lower the pand and change the filter and replace the fluid that came out. If you are not having a problem with your tranny this is what I would suggest. As the fluid gets older the tranny gets "used to" the old oil that is in there. When you add new fluids the new fluid contains detergents that clean the internal parts as they circulate. Unless this is the first time you've been to the recommended mileage for changing the fluid (I.E. 30,000 miles) you could flush it. If you do not know the history of changes, or if you are at, lets say 100,000 miles I wouldn't recommend flushing it. When the new detergents clean out the parts they remove gunk that is actually helping the transmission. Don't get me wrong, you don't want a whole lot of gunk, but you also don't want to remove gunk that for example is holding a pin in place, so the pin falls out (just an example) I hope this wasn't too hard to understand, and I hope I answered your question.

Posted on May 18, 2009

  • analytica84 Feb 08, 2014

    Tyson - For the reasons you outlined, I too have been telling people not to change the fluid.

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The oil in my 2008 1.3 suzuki swift gearbox is milky any ideas


Milky is a sign of water/cooling fluid mixed with the oil. Somewhere in the motor/transaxle you have a leak.

Oct 09, 2014 | Suzuki Swift Cars & Trucks

Tip

How to change my automatice transmission fluid most vehicles.


A basic rule of thumb for changing the trans fluid is two fold. Time and condition. As a lubricant it should be changed about every 2 years or about 30-36,000 miles. However, if your trans has a dipstick, you can check the condition of the fluid and determine if you have more or less time. The fluid should be red and clean. If it is black, sorry too late, if it is brown or brownish red, change it. If it is bright red, it is still good.

There are two methods of changing transmission fluid.

The first is to remove the pan and dump all fluid in the pan out, replace the filter and pan gasket and put it all back together and refill trans
There is a problem with this method. While a new filter may seem nice, it is not necessary unless the vehicle is quite old. The filter is there to keep very tiny wear particles from the transmission's internal components from reaching the valve body and causing a valve to hang up. If there is so much material in the pan that it blocks the filter, it is too late to change the fluid, you need an overhaul. Also when you use this method you only change about 50% of the fluid. There is fluid in the torque converter, cooling system and throughout the trans that is not changed.

The second method that I personally recommend for those who want to maintain your trans, (More less you are doing it because it is good maintenance and not because you suspect you have a problem) is a flush method. This process does take a little mechanical aptitude, but can be used on all types of automatic transmission.

First you find a cooler line coming from the trans to your radiator. either one is ok, pick the one that is easiest to get to. For those of you who want to do it the best way, look up and find which line is returning from the cooler back to the trans and unhook that one. Once you know what size the cooler line is, most are either 5/16th or 3/8's. You can pick up a short brake line at a parts store that will screw into the line hole in the radiator. At the same time that you get the brake line, buy a foot of fuel line that fits over the end of the brake line, You may need to bend the line to get it to fit, If you do not have a bender, just bend it a little at a time, just don't let it crimp closed. Screw the brake line and and attach a piece of hose to both lines so that you can catch the fluid as it comes out. Depending on the type of trans you will need between 8 to 15 quarts of fluid and a long neck funnel.

Once you have this all together, put the funnel in the dip stick tube, or remove the radiator type cap on the trans, and be ready to put in fluid. Start the car with the e brake on and in neutral. (if your car has an e-brake release out of part, do it in park, it is not a major difference.) As your fluid is being pumped out of the cooler line in to a catcher, slowly add fluid back into the trans. try to equal the amount to what is being pumped out. When you start seen fresh red fluid again. stop putting fluid in for approximately a quart worth of oil coming out and then shut the car off. reattach the cooler line into the radiator, start the car and check your fluid level. If you need to add fluid until it reaches the full mark, hot and running.

You just changed all your fluid.

Note, certain trans do not have a dip stick and while this procedure will work, you have to know where the plug is that comes off to check fluid level. Some of these models are GM mid size like Malibu, Mazda, Ford Explorers, BMW/s. These and I am sure others have a pipe plug that when you find it while the vehicle is running you fill the trans until you see fluid running out of the plug.

After all this, you understand why a shop will charge 100+120 to perform the service with a flush machine that cost them $5,000. But if you like working on your car, you can do it yourself and save about 60 bucks.

Submitted by Rich (autotherapist) with 28 years of transmission rebuilding and shop ownership in the transmissions field.

on Dec 14, 2009 | Dodge Caravan Cars & Trucks

Tip

How to change my automatic transmission fluid most vehicles


A basic rule of thumb for changing the trans fluid is two fold. Time and condition. As a lubricant it should be changed about every 2 years or about 30-36,000 miles. However, if your trans has a dipstick, you can check the condition of the fluid and determine if you have more or less time. The fluid should be red and clean. If it is black, sorry too late, if it is brown or brownish red, change it. If it is bright red, it is still good.

There are two methods of changing transmission fluid.

The first is to remove the pan and dump all fluid in the pan out, replace the filter and pan gasket and put it all back together and refill trans
There is a problem with this method. While a new filter may seem nice, it is not necessary unless the vehicle is quite old. The filter is there to keep very tiny wear particles from the transmission's internal components from reaching the valve body and causing a valve to hang up. If there is so much material in the pan that it blocks the filter, it is too late to change the fluid, you need an overhaul. Also when you use this method you only change about 50% of the fluid. There is fluid in the torque converter, cooling system and throughout the trans that is not changed.

The second method that I personally recommend for those who want to maintain your trans, (More less you are doing it because it is good maintenance and not because you suspect you have a problem) is a flush method. This process does take a little mechanical aptitude, but can be used on all types of automatic transmission.

First you find a cooler line coming from the trans to your radiator. either one is ok, pick the one that is easiest to get to. For those of you who want to do it the best way, look up and find which line is returning from the cooler back to the trans and unhook that one. Once you know what size the cooler line is, most are either 5/16th or 3/8's. You can pick up a short brake line at a parts store that will screw into the line hole in the radiator. At the same time that you get the brake line, buy a foot of fuel line that fits over the end of the brake line, You may need to bend the line to get it to fit, If you do not have a bender, just bend it a little at a time, just don't let it crimp closed. Screw the brake line and and attach a piece of hose to both lines so that you can catch the fluid as it comes out. Depending on the type of trans you will need between 8 to 15 quarts of fluid and a long neck funnel.

Once you have this all together, put the funnel in the dip stick tube, or remove the radiator type cap on the trans, and be ready to put in fluid. Start the car with the e brake on and in neutral. (if your car has an e-brake release out of part, do it in park, it is not a major difference.) As your fluid is being pumped out of the cooler line in to a catcher, slowly add fluid back into the trans. try to equal the amount to what is being pumped out. When you start seen fresh red fluid again. stop putting fluid in for approximately a quart worth of oil coming out and then shut the car off. reattach the cooler line into the radiator, start the car and check your fluid level. If you need to add fluid until it reaches the full mark, hot and running.

You just changed all your fluid.

Note, certain trans do not have a dip stick and while this procedure will work, you have to know where the plug is that comes off to check fluid level. Some of these models are GM mid size like Malibu, Mazda, Ford Explorers, BMW/s. These and I am sure others have a pipe plug that when you find it while the vehicle is running you fill the trans until you see fluid running out of the plug.

After all this, you understand why a shop will charge 100+120 to perform the service with a flush machine that cost them $5,000. But if you like working on your car, you can do it yourself and save about 60 bucks.

Submitted by Rich (autotherapist) with 28 years of transmission rebuilding and shop ownership in the transmissions field.

on Dec 14, 2009 | Cadillac DeVille Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I emptied all the transmission fluied out and changed the screen....the fluied was a strange color and it looked like water was in it....so i fill it up with new fluied and i try to put it in drive and it...


Joseph, what matters is what is contaminating the fluid. Likely the Coolant. What happens sometimes is the cooler is located in the radiator and that fails and coolant goes into the trans fluid.
What you need to do is find and correct the issue and then go to a lube shop that has the T-tech trans flush machine. In essence,the machine hooks up to trans lines and lets old fluid out while pumping new fluid in...until the exiting fluid is clean...The best and only flush method.
Fluid remains in the torque converter with any other draining method.

Oct 12, 2012 | 1998 Buick Park Avenue

1 Answer

How to flush an automatic transmission on a 2000 Mercury cougar


on the lowest part of the transmission there is a plug....size 7/16 or 11mm, pull and drain and refill through dipstick approx 7 litres of fluid

other method is to hook a flushing machine in line in your transmission cooler lines and start the cycle of machine approx 12 litres of fluid

good luck
and be careful not to overfill

Jay

Jun 23, 2011 | Mercury Cougar Cars & Trucks

Tip

How to change my automatic Transmission Fluid, most vehicles


A basic rule of thumb for changing the trans fluid is two fold. Time and condition. As a lubricant it should be changed about every 2 years or about 30-36,000 miles. However, if your trans has a dipstick, you can check the condition of the fluid and determine if you have more or less time. The fluid should be red and clean. If it is black, sorry too late, if it is brown or brownish red, change it. If it is bright red, it is still good.

There are two methods of changing transmission fluid.

The first is to remove the pan and dump all fluid in the pan out, replace the filter and pan gasket and put it all back together and refill trans
There is a problem with this method. While a new filter may seem nice, it is not necessary unless the vehicle is quite old. The filter is there to keep very tiny wear particles from the transmission's internal components from reaching the valve body and causing a valve to hang up. If there is so much material in the pan that it blocks the filter, it is too late to change the fluid, you need an overhaul. Also when you use this method you only change about 50% of the fluid. There is fluid in the torque converter, cooling system and throughout the trans that is not changed.

The second method that I personally recommend for those who want to maintain your trans, (More less you are doing it because it is good maintenance and not because you suspect you have a problem) is a flush method. This process does take a little mechanical aptitude, but can be used on all types of automatic transmission.

First you find a cooler line coming from the trans to your radiator. either one is ok, pick the one that is easiest to get to. For those of you who want to do it the best way, look up and find which line is returning from the cooler back to the trans and unhook that one. Once you know what size the cooler line is, most are either 5/16th or 3/8's. You can pick up a short brake line at a parts store that will screw into the line hole in the radiator. At the same time that you get the brake line, buy a foot of fuel line that fits over the end of the brake line, You may need to bend the line to get it to fit, If you do not have a bender, just bend it a little at a time, just don't let it crimp closed. Screw the brake line and and attach a piece of hose to both lines so that you can catch the fluid as it comes out. Depending on the type of trans you will need between 8 to 15 quarts of fluid and a long neck funnel.

Once you have this all together, put the funnel in the dip stick tube, or remove the radiator type cap on the trans, and be ready to put in fluid. Start the car with the e brake on and in neutral. (if your car has an e-brake release out of part, do it in park, it is not a major difference.) As your fluid is being pumped out of the cooler line in to a catcher, slowly add fluid back into the trans. try to equal the amount to what is being pumped out. When you start seen fresh red fluid again. stop putting fluid in for approximately a quart worth of oil coming out and then shut the car off. reattach the cooler line into the radiator, start the car and check your fluid level. If you need to add fluid until it reaches the full mark, hot and running.

You just changed all your fluid.

Note, certain trans do not have a dip stick and while this procedure will work, you have to know where the plug is that comes off to check fluid level. Some of these models are GM mid size like Malibu, Mazda, Ford Explorers, BMW/s. These and I am sure others have a pipe plug that when you find it while the vehicle is running you fill the trans until you see fluid running out of the plug.

After all this, you understand why a shop will charge 100+120 to perform the service with a flush machine that cost them $5,000. But if you like working on your car, you can do it yourself and save about 60 bucks.

Submitted by Rich (autotherapist) with 28 years of transmission rebuilding and shop ownership in the transmissions field.

on Dec 14, 2009 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

Tip

How to change your Automatic Transmission fluid, most cars


A basic rule of thumb for changing the trans fluid is two fold. Time and condition. As a lubricant it should be changed about every 2 years or about 30-36,000 miles. However, if your trans has a dipstick, you can check the condition of the fluid and determine if you have more or less time. The fluid should be red and clean. If it is black, sorry too late, if it is brown or brownish red, change it. If it is bright red, it is still good.

There are two methods of changing transmission fluid.

The first is to remove the pan and dump all fluid in the pan out, replace the filter and pan gasket and put it all back together and refill trans
There is a problem with this method. While a new filter may seem nice, it is not necessary unless the vehicle is quite old. The filter is there to keep very tiny wear particles from the transmission's internal components from reaching the valve body and causing a valve to hang up. If there is so much material in the pan that it blocks the filter, it is too late to change the fluid, you need an overhaul. Also when you use this method you only change about 50% of the fluid. There is fluid in the torque converter, cooling system and throughout the trans that is not changed.

The second method that I personally recommend for those who want to maintain your trans, (More less you are doing it because it is good maintenance and not because you suspect you have a problem) is a flush method. This process does take a little mechanical aptitude, but can be used on all types of automatic transmission.

First you find a cooler line coming from the trans to your radiator. either one is ok, pick the one that is easiest to get to. For those of you who want to do it the best way, look up and find which line is returning from the cooler back to the trans and unhook that one. Once you know what size the cooler line is, most are either 5/16th or 3/8's. You can pick up a short brake line at a parts store that will screw into the line hole in the radiator. At the same time that you get the brake line, buy a foot of fuel line that fits over the end of the brake line, You may need to bend the line to get it to fit, If you do not have a bender, just bend it a little at a time, just don't let it crimp closed. Screw the brake line and and attach a piece of hose to both lines so that you can catch the fluid as it comes out. Depending on the type of trans you will need between 8 to 15 quarts of fluid and a long neck funnel.

Once you have this all together, put the funnel in the dip stick tube, or remove the radiator type cap on the trans, and be ready to put in fluid. Start the car with the e brake on and in neutral. (if your car has an e-brake release out of part, do it in park, it is not a major difference.) As your fluid is being pumped out of the cooler line in to a catcher, slowly add fluid back into the trans. try to equal the amount to what is being pumped out. When you start seen fresh red fluid again. stop putting fluid in for approximately a quart worth of oil coming out and then shut the car off. reattach the cooler line into the radiator, start the car and check your fluid level. If you need to add fluid until it reaches the full mark, hot and running.

You just changed all your fluid.

Note, certain trans do not have a dip stick and while this procedure will work, you have to know where the plug is that comes off to check fluid level. Some of these models are GM mid size like Malibu, Mazda, Ford Explorers, BMW/s. These and I am sure others have a pipe plug that when you find it while the vehicle is running you fill the trans until you see fluid running out of the plug.

After all this, you understand why a shop will charge 100+120 to perform the service with a flush machine that cost them $5,000. But if you like working on your car, you can do it yourself and save about 60 bucks.

Submitted by Rich (autotherapist) with 28 years of transmission rebuilding and shop ownership in the transmissions field.

on Dec 14, 2009 | Chevrolet 1500 Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

Need to service trans on my 05 lancer can you flush trans


On automatic transmission that has over 100,000 miles,you should not flash it. DO NOT got to a shop that use re-circulate machine to flush out the transmission.

Base on the 2005 production year,you should have only 60,000 on the transmission.

The correct method is to purchase the transmission filter,pan gasket kit + transmission fluid and a trans line cleaning fluid.

c0bd2ff.jpg

Get the complete kit from your auto parts supply store and do the drain,cooler flush and filter change.

Recycle your old transmission fluid at your part store or recycling center.

Jun 29, 2010 | 2004 Mitsubishi Lancer

1 Answer

HOW DO I CHANGE THE TRANSMISSION FLUID MYSELF


WEll, you drop the pan. Be certain to change the FILTER.

Alternatively, consider a lube shop to do this. There is TONS of fluid in cooling lines, cooler, and converter that you cannot change at home... At the shop, they open the lines and flush new fluid in until clean fluid comes out. This is the best method, but STILL change the filter.

May 24, 2010 | 2007 GMC Sierra 1500

Tip

How to change my automatic transmission fluid


A basic rule of thumb for changing the trans fluid is two fold. Time and condition. As a lubricant it should be changed about every 2 years or about 30-36,000 miles. However, if your trans has a dipstick, you can check the condition of the fluid and determine if you have more or less time. The fluid should be red and clean. If it is black, sorry too late, if it is brown or brownish red, change it. If it is bright red, it is still good.

There are two methods of changing transmission fluid.

The first is to remove the pan and dump all fluid in the pan out, replace the filter and pan gasket and put it all back together and refill trans
There is a problem with this method. While a new filter may seem nice, it is not necessary unless the vehicle is quite old. The filter is there to keep very tiny wear particles from the transmission's internal components from reaching the valve body and causing a valve to hang up. If there is so much material in the pan that it blocks the filter, it is too late to change the fluid, you need an overhaul. Also when you use this method you only change about 50% of the fluid. There is fluid in the torque converter, cooling system and throughout the trans that is not changed.

The second method that I personally recommend for those who want to maintain your trans, (More less you are doing it because it is good maintenance and not because you suspect you have a problem) is a flush method. This process does take a little mechanical aptitude, but can be used on all types of automatic transmission.

First you find a cooler line coming from the trans to your radiator. either one is ok, pick the one that is easiest to get to. For those of you who want to do it the best way, look up and find which line is returning from the cooler back to the trans and unhook that one. Once you know what size the cooler line is, most are either 5/16th or 3/8's. You can pick up a short brake line at a parts store that will screw into the line hole in the radiator. At the same time that you get the brake line, buy a foot of fuel line that fits over the end of the brake line, You may need to bend the line to get it to fit, If you do not have a bender, just bend it a little at a time, just don't let it crimp closed. Screw the brake line and and attach a piece of hose to both lines so that you can catch the fluid as it comes out. Depending on the type of trans you will need between 8 to 15 quarts of fluid and a long neck funnel.

Once you have this all together, put the funnel in the dip stick tube, or remove the radiator type cap on the trans, and be ready to put in fluid. Start the car with the e brake on and in neutral. (if your car has an e-brake release out of part, do it in park, it is not a major difference.) As your fluid is being pumped out of the cooler line in to a catcher, slowly add fluid back into the trans. try to equal the amount to what is being pumped out. When you start seen fresh red fluid again. stop putting fluid in for approximately a quart worth of oil coming out and then shut the car off. reattach the cooler line into the radiator, start the car and check your fluid level. If you need to add fluid until it reaches the full mark, hot and running.

You just changed all your fluid.

Note, certain trans do not have a dip stick and while this procedure will work, you have to know where the plug is that comes off to check fluid level. Some of these models are GM mid size like Malibu, Mazda, Ford Explorers, BMW/s. These and I am sure others have a pipe plug that when you find it while the vehicle is running you fill the trans until you see fluid running out of the plug.

After all this, you understand why a shop will charge 100+120 to perform the service with a flush machine that cost them $5,000. But if you like working on your car, you can do it yourself and save about 60 bucks.

Submitted by Rich (autotherapist) with 28 years of transmission rebuilding and shop ownership in the transmissions field.

on Dec 14, 2009 | Buick LeSabre Cars & Trucks

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