Question about 2000 Kia Sportage

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Water in all cylanders

Has water in all cylanders, head gasket looks good, compression low, no water in oil, is there any other way for water to get I all cylanders

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Sounds familiar. If the engine oil is too full, oil will splash into the spark plug openings. Then, condensation will sit on the oil shorting the plugs. Be sure not to overfill. Also, the valve cover gasket has an inside seal. Once again, oil will partly fill the spark plug hole if the gasket is bad. There is a large hole in back of the valve cover leading right to the plugs. Be careful not to rinse the engine. Gaskets seal the plugs but water can sit on the plug openings.

Posted on Apr 19, 2014

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2001hyundai accent signs of blown head gasket


Same as any other engine. The head gasket can blow between two cylinders, in which case compression in each will be very low, or it can blow/leak water into oil such that the oil will be milky looking, or it can blow to the outside and show as leaks. One good way to test individual cylinders, is to remove a spark plug and screw in an air chuck made for this use and hook up compressed air. Is you then see bubbles in the radiator coolant gasket is leaking, or if the dipstick blows out the leak is to the oil.

Oct 22, 2016 | 2011 Hyundai Accent

1 Answer

No compression number 1 cylinder did the leak test on valve no leaks piston looks ok please help


There are 4 main possibilities:
- Bad Valve seats
- Bad compression rings
- Bad head gasket
- Bad piston.
If there is no compression as in ZERO on a compression test, I'd look for a stuck open valve or a hole in the piston.
A blown head gasket will give different symptoms depending on where it's gone. Look for water in the oil, low coolant level, pull the oil filler cap and look for water vapour.

Mar 04, 2015 | 2001 Chevrolet Malibu

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My neon will not start replace heads and radiator frist


Signs of a Blown Head Gasket
Note: You can only truly confirm your suspicion by actually seeing the gasket, although precursor signs are usually evident.

Input from Answers.com contributors:

If you see coolant leaking from the water pump, I would pressure-test it and pinpoint the leak and fix that first; oil seepage isn't necessarily abnormal.
Typical symptoms of a blown head gasket may include these: bubbles of air coming up into your radiator (remove cap before starting); a leaking radiator; milkshake-colored oil; overheating; rough running; coolant or oil running from head; spark plug(s) that have a green tint (if green coolant); white-colored or sweet-smelling exhaust.
White smoke from your tail pipe, or loosing coolant through your overflow. Take the cap off and rev the engine: if you see bubbles, or if it comes out, you'll know.
A blown head gasket will leave a dark smell in the radiator. And you will have high back pressure coming though your radiator cap.
Take your car to a radiator shop to have a detector installed: If the blue liquid inside a "bulb" turns yellow, you have a leak.
Beware that if you drive for too long and it overheats, a blown engine will be your outcome.
A blown head gasket can go out in different areas causing different symptoms. Do a compression test to give you some idea. Don't confuse low compression for a bad head gasket, though. A bad valve can lower compression. And a bad ring.
There are lots of clues you can look for. When in doubt and you have tried everything, have the head checked out by a well-established machine shop first, to see if the head was the problem. This way you're not wasting your time replacing the gasket.
My car once had a blown head gasket. I had a great deal of coolant loss. The engine lacked power and ran poorly. It had white smoke coming out the tail pipe. And it overheated very quickly. Also, it had water in the oil.
A quick way to check: Look at your spark plugs; if coolant squirts out, you definitely have a blown head gasket!
Low compression does not necessarily mean a blown head gasket, but it is a good indicator if there is a sharp drop in compression on one or two cylinders, with no drop in the others. Sometimes a blown head gasket will cause a whistling or wheezing sound, but not always. It will not always cause water to enter the oil - or oil to enter the water - but they are signs to look for. Overheating will almost always occur, due to the exhaust entering the coolant. Check your overflow bottle for exhaust smells. Watch for bubbles or overflow of coolant from the radiator while running the engine. Check for muddy gray-looking oil or bubbles on the dipstick.
Often (but not always), a blown head gasket will also cause deposit of water on a piece of cardboard held an inch from the tailpipe output while the engine is running (when this is happening, it is likely that the catalytic converter has been ruined and the muffler will corrode in short order as well). Sometimes drops of water will be seen dropping from the end of the tailpipe.
Another clue: Turn on the heater; often when the head gasket is blown an odor of antifreeze and synthetic rubber will emanate from the heater vents.
Many of the symptoms of a blown head gasket can be caused by some other problem in the cooling system, without the head gasket being damaged. Conversely, other problems with the cooling system can cause a blown head gasket and/or warped head. For example, a corroding radiator can send chunks of rust through the cooling system which take out the thermostat and water pump. If the thermostat is old, sticking and corroding, it can send those chunks through the system and take out the water pump or cause a blockage in the radiator, etc.
Radiator leaks can be the primary cause, or a result, of failures in other cooling system components.
Don't keep driving with the car overheated, especially if your engine has an aluminum head; you are likely to warp it. If it is warped beyond a certain tolerance, it cannot be planed and will have to be replaced when the head gasket is replaced.
One of the most common tell-tale signs is a milky-gray ring around your oil cap. When coolant enters the engine oil through a crack in the head or through a blown gasket, it evaporates and leaves a milky ring around the oil cap. Another easy way to tell is to check your oil dipstick. Change your oil and pull out the dipstick. Make sure that you take note of how far up the dipstick the oil is. Top off your cooling system and fill your cooling reservoir to the top. Screw radiator cap back on and start engine. Run engine for about 20-30 minutes or until it reaches normal operating temperature. Allow engine to cool (engine must cool completely to get accurate oil reading). Check oil dipstick again. If the oil has a watery appearance and has risen noticeably up the dipstick, then you probably have a blown head gasket or a warped head. Also, look for a sweet-smelling liquid coming out of your tailpipe. Any of the above symptoms could be the result of a blown head gasket.
The easiest way to tell is with a compression meter. This replaces the spark plug and lets you know what compression each cylinder is running at. If your compression is abnormally low, then you have a blown head gasket or a warped head. (Note: check the repair manual for appropriate compression of each cylinder.)
This can be detected in a variety of ways: One way is to note whether that part of the engine block is leaking fluid. This is difficult to determine since there are many other parts of the engine nearby that can also leak fluids, especially when a vehicle is parked in one place for more than a few hours. One of the best indications of a blown, or nearly blown, head gasket in most automobiles is when the cooling system appears to be malfunctioning. The cooling system's efficiency and performance can be directly affected by the quality of the head gasket.
If your radiator is getting low on water often, this is a sign. The water could be discharged through the tailpipe on your automobile. Another sign is if your car motor has a miss in the engine. The water could be going in on top of the cylinders. This will foul the plugs and cause it to miss.
There are a few simple indicators you can check for with the engine cold and not running: 1) contaminated oil - it will have a milky appearance from the water mixing in the oil 2) oil on the top of the coolant inside the radiator (if your vehicle has a remote header tank you may not get this); 3) Have someone crank (remove the coil lead or disable the electronic ignition) the engine on the starter with the radiator cap or coolant jacket bleed hose/bolt removed. If the coolant pulses up and down or blows bubbles, you could be in trouble. If you find any of these symptoms move on to removing the spark plugs (label the plugs and the leads as you remove them, so you can put them back in the same place) and again crank the engine on the starter. Depending on how badly your head or gasket is gone, you may get coolant or oil coming out of the plug holes. Inspection of the plugs will also reveal problems during combustion: if you have rusty flaky deposits on the plugs, you may be burning off water; and if you have a heavy carbon, you are burning oil. If you have any of the first 3 items listed (water in oil, oil in water, or pulsing coolant - but don't get any result from checking the plugs) change the oil and water as appropriate, then warm up the engine without the radiator cap on (or the bleeder hose/bolt) and watch for bubbles as the engine warms up. Put the cap back on the cooling system and take the vehicle for a short drive, or run the engine till the entire system is up to temperature and then check the oil for contamination. Having these symptoms is not always indicative of a blown head gasket; usually if the gasket is gone, there is going to be some warping of the head and or block of the engine.
Loss of engine coolant with no external leaks, a continuous stream of bubbles can be seen with the radiator cap off, black gummy and sometimes crusty stuff around the radiator


Several common signs of a blown head gasket:

Blue/white smoke coming out the tail pipe which indicates oil is burning
Dripping oil from the gasket itself
Carbon Monoxide or hydrocarbons in the cooling reservoir
Excessive coolant loss with no obvious source of leakage
Loss of power or a rough engine due to compression loss
Water mixing with oil
Oil mixing with water
Low compression in 2 or more adjacent cylinders
Remove dipstick and let a drop of fluid fall on hot part of engine - oil will smoke water will "sizzle"

Jul 29, 2012 | 2004 Dodge Neon

1 Answer

Water in oil


Water in the oil is most likely a head gasket leak-blown head gasket. You will have to pull the cylinder head off and replace the head gasket. If it's a V6 or V8 engine, a compression test will tell you which bank of the engine has the head gasket problem. One cylinder or two cylinders next to each other will have low compression.

May 23, 2012 | 1985 Chevrolet Chevy

1 Answer

Car overheated random cylindar misfire after the overheat after it heats up it bogs down and eventually dies. I have done a compresion test 2 center cylander are 10-15 psi depending also little black...


if the center 2 cylinders have only 10-15lbs pressure then you need to do a wet compression test to see if it is valves or piston rings that are bad.put about tablespoon of oil into each cylinder and turn over motor and redo the compression test.if the compression goes up you have a ring problem if it doesn`t it is a valve problem.you should check the oil to see if it has a white-caramel look to it as this indicates water in the oil.(head gasket) if the coolant level is low it can be burning coolant,you should have the cooling pressure tested just in case.it could possibly be a cracked head.if it overheats because of the low compression(sometimes happens) the motor is working twice as hard(runs hotter) as the other good cylinders have to work harder to do the same amount of work,

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2001 Chevy Malibu have had intake manifold gasket replaced twice since buying car in 2002. I drove it to work fine, coming home( only 5 miles away) steam coming out from the hood. The resevoir (coolant)...


Hi and welcome to FixYa!

It's definitely a damaged head gasket. If the head gasket is damaged you'll have an oil and water mixture that's milky in appearance. You will need to have it replaced and be sure that you check if the head itself has cracks. If it has, a machine shop will be helpful.

Hope this helps and thank you for using FixYa! Have a good one!

Mar 03, 2011 | 2001 Chevrolet Malibu

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How do i tell if the heads creaked on a 91 celica


a cracked head or blown head gasket,will cause your vehicle to have a miss in the cylander where the crack is or where the gasket is blown. you can also see coolant leaking if the gasket is blown. you can also see water in the oil,and white smoke come from the exhaust.
to tell for sure that the head is cracked,and not just a blown gasket is to remove the head. you will instantly see if the gasket is blown. if its not,then turn the head upside down and look at the small space between the valves,as this is where 99% of cracks occur.

May 03, 2010 | 1991 Toyota Celica

1 Answer

Cooling System - Fiat Siecento 2002


When checking for a blown head gasket, one of the most common tell-tale signs is a milky-gray ring around your oil cap. When coolant enters the engine oil through a crack in the head or through a blown gasket, it evaportats and leaves a milky ring around the oil cap. Another easy way to tell is to check your oil dipstick. Change your oil and pull out the dipstick. Make sure that you take note of how far up the dipstick the oil is. Top off your cooling system and fill your cooling resevoir to the top. Screw radiator cap back on and start engine. Run engine for about 20-30 mins. or until it reaches normal operating temperature. Allow engine to cool (engine must cool completely to get accurate oil reading!!). Check oil dipstick again. If the oil has a watery appearence and has risen noticibly up the dipstick, the you probably have a blown head gasket or a warped head. Also look for a dripping, sweet-smelling liquid coming out of your tailpipe. Any of the above symptoms could be the result of a blown head gasket. The easiest way to tell is with a compression meter. This replaces the spark plug and lets you know what compression each cylander is running at. If your compression is abnormally low, then you have a blown head gasket or a warped head. (note: consult repair manual for appropriate compression of each cylander.)

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Water backs up in the overflow tank and actually runs out on the ground, I have replaced the thermostat and the radeator? and it still does it. Is it possible I have a blown head gasket? The car overheats...


When checking for a blown head gasket, one of the most common tell-tale signs is a milky-gray ring around your oil cap. When coolant enters the engine oil through a crack in the head or through a blown gasket, it evaportats and leaves a milky ring around the oil cap. Another easy way to tell is to check your oil dipstick. Change your oil and pull out the dipstick. Make sure that you take note of how far up the dipstick the oil is. Top off your cooling system and fill your cooling resevoir to the top. Screw radiator cap back on and start engine. Run engine for about 20-30 mins. or until it reaches normal operating temperature. Allow engine to cool (engine must cool completely to get accurate oil reading!!). Check oil dipstick again. If the oil has a watery appearence and has risen noticibly up the dipstick, the you probably have a blown head gasket or a warped head. Also look for a dripping, sweet-smelling liquid coming out of your tailpipe. Any of the above symptoms could be the result of a blown head gasket. The easiest way to tell is with a compression meter. This replaces the spark plug and lets you know what compression each cylander is running at. If your compression is abnormally low, then you have a blown head gasket or a warped head. (note: consult repair manual for appropriate compression of each cylander.)

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1 Answer

My 1980 944 as the motor warms up it gradually begins to smoke a white smoke the cylander compression is good the plugs have a white color to them is it fuel injection ,maybe head gasket although there is...


White smoke suggests to me that your brake master cylinder may be leaking into your booster and the diaphragm may be split, thus allowing brake fluid into the engine.

Jul 01, 2009 | 1988 Porsche 944

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