Question about 2001 Volkswagen Eurovan

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Engine temperature sensor often stops working.

The engine temperature indicator sometimes works correctly, but sometimes it will drift down from the usual 190, and sometimes it falls abruptly. Sometimes it does not work at all. Can you please send a schematic of the location of the heat indicator on the engine and do you have any suggestions on how I can use my mechanical knowledge to repair this?

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I had the same problem with my 1990 2.5 Syncro.
By chance I discovered that the HT lead from the coil to the distributer was arcing onto the body, causing 'background' charge(?). Replaced the lead and every back to normal...

Posted on Jul 14, 2009

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I have a 1992 toyota paseo and the temperature gauge doesnt give me the correct temperature


there could be a faulty temperature sender or the connections can be dirty in the plug that goes on it clean it first and see what happens if this doesn't work buy a new one if that doesn't work you might not have a thermostat installed and the gauge stays down and only sometimes raises a little then drops down again

Aug 25, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

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ECT - Engine Coolant Temperature sensor


<p><b><span>2.2) <span> </span><u>ECT - Engine Coolant Temperature </u>(sensor)<u></u></span></b><br /> <p><b><u><span><span> </span></span></u></b><br /> <p><b><span>What is it?</span></b><span> This is small electrical device for measuring the coolant temperature in the engine</span><br /> <p><span> </span><br /> <p><b><span>Where is it located?</span></b><span> It is usually located on the engine near to the thermostat housing.<span> </span>The ECT is sited on the 'hot' side of the thermostat so that it senses the coolant/engine temperature before the thermostat opens and allows coolant to flow through the radiator.</span><br /> <p><span> </span><br /> <p><b><span>How does it work?</span></b><span> Modern temperature sensors consist of a thermistor in a sealed unit.<span> </span>As the temperature rises the electrical resistance varies proportionately; some thermistors increase their resistance with temperature (PTC - positive temperature correlation) whilst others decrease their resistance (NTC - negative temperature correlation).<span> </span>When the engine is cold at start up the coolant sensor sends an appropriate signal to the ECU.<span> </span>The ECU responds by increasing the length of the injection cycles to enrich the combustion mix.<span> </span>This is an electronic equivalent of pulling the 'choke' out on a carburetor.<span> </span>As the engine warms up the signals from the coolant sensor cause the ECU to shorten the injection cycles making the fuel mix progressively leaner.<span> </span>The process of coolant sensor and ECU interaction explains why engines have a slightly faster idle when starting cold than when running hot.</span><br /> <p><span> </span><br /> <p><b><u><span>Symptoms of faulty coolant sensor</span></u></b><br /> <p><b><span>Associated OBD2 error codes DTCs: <span> </span>P0115 - P119; P0125, P0126, P0128</span></b><br /> <p><b><u><span><span> </span></span></u></b><br /> <ul> <li><b><span>Poor starting</span></b><span> - If the coolant sensor reports in error that the engine is warm the ECU will not enrich the fuel mix at ignition.<span> </span>The engine will falter at idle if it is not given additional help by the driver by pressing on the accelerator pedal to maintain speed.<span> </span>Once the engine has warmed up the engine will behave correctly.</span></li> <li><b><span>Fast/erratic idle, Poor fuel economy - </span></b><span>conversely if<b> </b>the coolant sensor reports in error that the engine is permanently 'cold' the ECU will keep the fuel mix rich.<span> </span>This is OK at start up but will become more noticeable when the engine is hot; idle will be fast and lumpy.<span> </span>Fuel consumption will be high due the permanently rich fuel mix set by the ECU.<b></b></span></li> <li><b><span>Excessive emissions - </span></b><span>the enriched fuel mix delivered in response to ECT signal error causes the exhaust to be heavy in un-burnt hydrocarbons.<span> </span>This often results in 'emission test' failure.<b></b></span></li> </ul> <p><b><span> </span></b><br /> <p><b><span>How to check? </span></b><span><span> </span>Most often the <b>coolant sensor</b> is quite separate to the <b>temperature sender</b>, so a correct read-out on the dash board does not necessarily indicate correct sensor function. Using<b> </b>a voltmeter the resistance across the electrical terminals on the sensor can be measured.<span> </span>By removing the device from the car and putting the end of the sensor in a pan of hot water it should be possible to see an immediate change in resistance, it does not matter so much that the resistance goes up or down but that there is a discernable change with change in temperature.<span> </span>Generally high resistance equates to cold temperatures and vice versa. If there is no resistance change commensurate with temperature change then the sensor is at fault.<span> </span>If there is simply no resistance measurable (open circuit) then the sensor is at fault. If the sensor is working correctly check the connector, the wiring and the wiring insulation for faults and possible shorting.</span><br /> <p><b><span> </span></b><br /> <p><b><span>How to fix?<span> </span></span></b><span>Replace if found faulty</span><br /> <p><span><br /></span><br /> <p><span><b>NEXT 3.1) CKP - Crankshaft position sensor</b></span><br />

on Jul 22, 2011 | Mercedes-Benz E-Class Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Po115


The Code P0115 is a coolant sensor error (measures temperature of engine coolant). First make sure that you have enough coolant in the engine. If there is enough coolant and you still get the error then the following explanation should help:-

What is it?
This is small electrical device for measuring the coolant temperature in the engine

Where is it located? It is usually located on the engine near to the thermostat housing. The ECT is sited on the 'hot' side of the thermostat so that it senses the coolant/engine temperature before the thermostat opens and allows coolant to flow through the radiator.

How does it work? Modern temperature sensors consist of a thermistor in a sealed unit. As the temperature rises the electrical resistance varies proportionately; some thermistors increase their resistance with temperature (PTC - positive temperature correlation) whilst others decrease their resistance (NTC - negative temperature correlation). When the engine is cold at start up the coolant sensor sends an appropriate signal to the ECU. The ECU responds by increasing the length of the injection cycles to enrich the combustion mix. This is an electronic equivalent of pulling the 'choke' out on a carburetor. As the engine warms up the signals from the coolant sensor cause the ECU to shorten the injection cycles making the fuel mix progressively leaner. The process of coolant sensor and ECU interaction explains why engines have a slightly faster idle when starting cold than when running hot.

Symptoms of faulty coolant sensor
Associated OBD2 error codes DTCs: P0115 - P119; P0125, P0126, P0128

  • 2.2a Poor starting - If the coolant sensor reports in error that the engine is warm the ECU (electronic control unit) will not enrich the fuel mix at ignition. The engine will falter at idle if it is not given additional help by the driver by pressing on the accelerator pedal to maintain speed. Once the engine has warmed up the engine will behave correctly.
  • 2.2b Fast/erratic idle, Poor fuel economy - conversely ifthe coolant sensor reports in error that the engine is permanently 'cold' the ECU (electronic control unit) will keep the fuel mix rich. This is OK at start up but will become more noticeable when the engine is hot; idle will be fast and lumpy. Fuel consumption will be high due the permanently rich fuel mix set by the ECU.
  • 2.2c Excessive emissions - the enriched fuel mix delivered in response to ECT (engine coolant temperature) signal error causes the exhaust to be heavy in un-burnt hydrocarbons. This often results in 'emission test' failure.

How to check? Most often the coolant sensor is quite separate to the temperature sender, so a correct read-out on the dash board does not necessarily indicate correct sensor function. Usinga voltmeter the resistance across the electrical terminals on the sensor can be measured. By removing the device from the car and putting the end of the sensor in a pan of hot water it should be possible to see an immediate change in resistance, it does not matter so much that the resistance goes up or down but that there is a discernable change with change in temperature. Generally high resistance equates to cold temperatures and vice versa. If there is no resistance change commensurate with temperature change then the sensor is at fault. If there is simply no resistance measurable (open circuit) then the sensor is at fault. If the sensor is working correctly check the connector, the wiring and the wiring insulation for faults and possible shorting.

How to fix? Replace if found faulty

May 25, 2014 | 2001 Hyundai XG300

1 Answer

Toyota camry 2005 start fine while on motion, car suddenly stops accelerating, my temperature meter is un stable while i press the pedal what could it be?


Hello
The engine and automatic transmission in this vehicles drive train are fully electronically controlled by a computer called the PCM (Power Train Control Module). Whenever a problem like this occurs the computer stores a record of the problem (there are of course some exceptions to this, like the fuel pump, engine coolant temperature sensor and MAF sensor for instance) in the form of a fault code in its memory, to read these fault codes you must have the systems memory scanned with a special tool. Once the fault code(s) are read you then must perform the appropriate diagnostic testing to find and resolve the problem(s) DO NOT REPLACE ANY PARTS UNTIL A TRAINED TECHNICAIN HAS DIAGNOSED THE PROBLEM TO AVOID SPENDING YOUR HARD EARNED MONEY ON PARTS THAT MAY NOT CORRECT THE PROBLEM

Aug 06, 2012 | 2003 Toyota Corolla

2 Answers

What could be making the radiator fans in my 2000 Alero stop working? We just replaced the old one yesterday and the fans worked great and then they stopped working again tonight. We checked the fuses...


the temperature sensor is next to thermostat housing disconnect the sensor and start the car if the fan works right away you have a faulty sensor also make sure there is good ground to the body and engine

May 30, 2011 | Oldsmobile Alero Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Error code po0117. Vw beetle


16501/P0117 - Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor (G62): Signal too Low Possible Symptoms
  • Difficulties with starting a cold engine.
  • Starting the engine when engine is warmish or warm, idle rpm immediately is 1200 - 3000 rpm.
  • RPM at idle is irregular.
  • With all engine temperatures seldom idle rpm will vary between 900 - 1000 rpm.
  • With engine warm (90 °C) the engine temperature suddenly drops (70 °C) and slowly comes back to 90 °C.
  • Bad acceleration during warming up.
    • Diesel: an indication is extreme long time burning time of the glow indication light.
Possible Causes
  • The electrical signal coming from G62 is too low
  • Wiring and/or connections faulty (short circuit?)
  • Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor (G62) faulty
Possible Solutions
  • Check wiring and connections
  • Check / Replace Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor (G62)
Special Notes
  • In MY 1995-2002 (?) in Europe at VW-cars the G2/G62 had the bad reputation of breaking down often. The default G2/G62 is black and all replacements are green.

Mar 21, 2010 | 1999 Volkswagen Beetle

1 Answer

Cooling fan operation


sounds to me like the thermostat is sticking and allowing the car to overheat. with the a/c on the fan comes on and runs constantly to keep the engine cool

Oct 22, 2009 | 2000 Ford Focus

2 Answers

What is an ETC sensor?


The sensor he is referring to is an engine coolant temperature sensor.
This sensor tell the computer the temperature of the coolant so the computer knows the correct amount of fuel to deliver for the operating temperature of the engine.
When the sensor fails, you will likely experience abnormal idle/performance while the engine is cold at startup, as well as increased fuel consumption sometimes to the extent of black, fuel rich exhaust smoke.
The sensor is located on the water neck/thermostat housing.

Oct 19, 2009 | 1995 Mitsubishi Eclipse

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