Question about 1999 Volvo S80

4 Answers

Steering/Suspension Mystery My S80 has over 100k miles, and I recently got a suspension job done, including : a. Both tie rods replaced b. Lower control arm bushing replaced c. Ball joints replaced d. Steering rack bush/stoppers replaced e. Full wheel alignment done. After all this work, the car does not seem to drive right. It has following symptoms: 1 On take-off, the steering pulls to the right, and drives straight with the steering tilted to right 2. On braking, the car pulls to the left, forcing a reverse reaction to the steering (hard right pull) 3. After releaseing the brakes, the steering comes back to the middle-semi-right tilted position when driving straight. 4. The car seems to turn more than I want to when turning a corner (sharper than planned turn) 5. Car and steering swings both ways when I hit a bump or depression in road. I did have the brake pads replaced a year ago, but no other work to brakes like rotors or calipers. The suspension seems tight as I got it checked out. Please advise what may be the possible causes.

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  • ashu9211 May 11, 2009

    I did it.. they did not find anything wrong with the alignment at Sears Auto. However they mentioned something may be going on with the brakes or suspension.

  • ashu9211 May 12, 2009

    I did get my car inspected for loose suspension/steering parts, but everything checked out ok.

    These problems started right after I got the tie rods, bushes, ball joints replaced. Something else may be going on.

  • ashu9211 May 13, 2009

    How does this explain the loose steering sensation when going over bumps? is it because the calipers are still stuck although I am not braking at that point? Thanks,

  • ashu9211 May 13, 2009

    How much of steering play is acceptable? Also wanted to mention another symptom that may be related.. the right wheel grinds against the fender when I turn the steering fully to left when car starts moving. The opposite steering action does not have this problem.

  • ashu9211 May 19, 2009

    I took the car to another shop, got the brakes inspected (no problems found), got it re-aligned (there was some toe they fixed), and it still does not drive right. When I accelerate, the steering tilts slightly to the right. On braking, the car seems to move to left, causing my steering to turn clockwise. When I let go of brakes, steering slowly corrects itself, and comes to center. There is also a grinding sort of noise in front wheels. Is this an alignment issue? What about steering rack & pinion? All this happened after I got my suspension work done, as stated in my original post.

  • ashu9211 May 19, 2009

    That does not help.. I think it is something very specific after all things done to date

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Ok after reading everything that you have posted I would recommend you getting a few more things checked:

  1. Try rotating the tires and see if an old wear pattern is causing what you are dealing with now and goes back to normal when you rotate back
  2. Check your suspension struts.  I have heard of guys that have an extreme pull to one side or another on acceleration and it was because when the struts where examined closely they didn't have any fluid left in them causing the pull
  3. Check the tire pressure on all tires and make sure they are correct. (This is an obvious/easy one but I normally miss these myself!)
I really hope that one of these helps you because it seems that you're having a tough time with this one.  Thanks for an honest rating and thanks for using FixYa.

Posted on May 19, 2009

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I would suggest bring it to more intensive and precise automotive service center .another solution would be replace all the suspension mechanism in front, replace all the disk brake mechanism front and back, and the last try buying 4 new tires have it aligned properly..hope this help. thanks for using fixya!

Posted on May 19, 2009

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Your problem sounds like a faulty brake caliper. You describe a pulling while pressing the brake. I'd look at the front left brake caliper. My guess is that it's frozen (not fully releasing when you take your foot off the brake). It's possible that with all the parts you had replaced that the problem was less pronounced due to all the other issues you were having with the tie rods and ball joints. Assuming your tires are fine after all the front end work, you car is displaying classic symptoms of having a frozen brake caliper. When you corner, the car slows down making the pulling more pronounced. A bad caliper will wear down the brake pads faster. I'd have the brakes inspected at another shop.(shame on Sears for not doing that already) I hope this solution helps with your issue.
All the best!
Greg

Posted on May 12, 2009

  • Greg Margossian
    Greg Margossian May 13, 2009

    You experience loose sensation going over bumps due to the lack of wheel contact with the road going over bumps. Rough terrain will make a vehicle pull to either side without any predictability. The consistent "pulling" you get when braking is due to a partially frozen brake caliper. A fully frozen caliper would grind and make it almost impossible to drive at all. A partially frozen caliper will react consistently every time you apply the brakes, grabbing just enough to pull your car to one side or another. I hope this explains a little more the problems you are experiencing. Take care!
    Greg


  • Greg Margossian
    Greg Margossian May 13, 2009

    If a wheel physically grinds against the fender, there would be excessive tire wear on that tire (something else Sears should have noticed) so I'm guessing if the tires are fine, you've definitely got a bad bearing in the rotor. This is serious and can only get worse. It can also do damage to the rotor itself (warping) and even the calipers. As far as "play" in the steering goes, that's a term that describes having to turn the wheel a great distance to make a turn and turning it back the other way to correct the turn (like driving a boat). The pulling you get upon braking is a brake issue and without pulling the wheels and inspecting the rotors/calipers/bearings/pads it's really impossible for me to speculate beyond that. Driving a car in this condition is dangerous and although I can appreciate the amount of time and money you've already spent, I strongly urge you to get it back to the shop (preferably a different shop) and get it attended to. I understand your concern and distrust with repair shops but without physically driving the car myself and pulling the wheels, I'm really making educated guesses based on my experience and my experience tells me that your car in its current condition is unsafe and is in need of repair. Please post back with any more questions. I'll answer whatever concerns you have.
    Greg


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Check your radius rod bushings. One side may be worn/damaged/loose allowing one of the wheels to move foward under power.
I would also check the engine/trans mounts. Too much movement can make torque steer worse.
wheel balane has nothing to do with a pull..........


bad tire, alignment out of specs, worn suspension parts will cause a pull.

you might want to switch the front tires side to side and retry it check tire pressure as well.

Also - the right side is the short shaft. If the left side CV joint(s) are worn - this could cause the short shaft side to have more control. (ie. the turning problem, and drifting on accell. and stopping)


From AA1CAR.com:
STEERING WANDER The vehicle lacks directional stability and wanders or drifts from side to side. Possible causes include:
Loose or worn steering components. Inspect the tie rod ends, inner tie rod sockets on rack & pinion steering units, and the idler arm and center link on parallelogram steering. Check the steering column couplings. Also check for loose or broken rack mounts. Check the amount of play in the steering rack
or steering gear. Lateral play at the edge of the steering wheel should usually be less than 1/4 inch (always refer to manufacturer specifications). Replace worn parts and/or adjust rack yoke or adjustment screw on steering box to reduce play.

Loose or improperly adjusted wheel bearings. Check and adjust wheel bearings to specifications.
Insufficient caster. This may be due to increased ride height at the rear of the vehicle (raising the rear end with air shocks or air springs) or lowered ride height at the front of the vehicle (weak springs or shorter than stock springs). Increase caster and/or reset to specifications.
Extremely low tire pressure. Inflate to recommended pressure.
Extreme toe misalignment. Check the steering linkage and adjust or repair as needed.


TORQUE STEER The steering veers or pulls to one side during hard acceleration. This is a common condition in front-wheel drive cars with unequal length driveshafts, and is caused by unequal toe changes as the suspension is loaded. Compliance allows the wheel with the longer driveshaft to experience less toe-in change than the wheel with the shorter driveshaft. This causes the vehicle to veer towards the side with the longer driveshaft. FWD cars with equal length driveshafts usually do not experience this condition.
Torque steer cannot be eliminated, but certain conditions may make it worse:
Loose or collapsed control arm bushings.
Loose or worn tie rod ends.
Loose or worn inner tie rod sockets.
Loose or broken engine/transaxle mounts.
Vehicle manufacturers have offered various repairs to reduce the severity of torque steer in some FWD cars. The corrective measures include using stiffer control arm bushings, shimming motor mounts, realigning the engine cradle, replacing the motor mounts with stiffer mounts, or increasing cross-camber.

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Posted on May 11, 2009

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1 Answer

Suspension and steering bad fast


did you replace all the parts your self or did you rely on the mechanics advice and paid for what he said it needed . Unless you really flogged the car I suspect that there was something going on and many of the parts may have needed replacing. For instance struts have an insert and it is not necessary to replace the whole thing including springs .

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Steering Wheel vibration only at certain speeds.


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Oct 07, 2012 | 2001 Isuzu Trooper

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Purchased focus sport 2006 model no service manual. Mileage 43,000 kms. Need to know service intervals either time/mileage perhaps a copy of the service schedule will suffice.


These maintenance intervals come from the maintenance interval calculator
at www.autozone.com, using a starting point of 25,800 miles (43000 km), and
assuming 1000 miles (1666 km) driven per month, and "severe driving conditions," which
are actually normal usage characteristics, such as frequent short trips, urban driving, waiting in traffic, driving in hot weather, trips under 16 km in cold weather, etc.

STARTING MILEAGE: 25800 (43,000 Kilometers)
Item
Action
Service History

20000 miles or 32000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


21000 miles or 33600 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


24000 miles or 38400 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


25000 miles or 40000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


27000 miles or 43200 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


30000 miles or 48000 kilometers

Battery Check
Air Filter Element Check
Wheel Bearing Lubricate
Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Fuel Filter Replace
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Fluid - A/T Replace
Cabin Air Filter Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Cooling System Inspect
Wheel Bearing Inspect
Ball Joint Inspect
Drive/Propeller Shaft Inspect
Exhaust System Inspect
Steering and Suspension Inspect
Heat Shield, Exhaust Inspect
Tires Rotate


33000 miles or 52800 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


35000 miles or 56000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


36000 miles or 57600 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


39000 miles or 62400 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


40000 miles or 64000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate



42000 miles or 67200 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


45000 miles or 72000 kilometers

Battery Check
Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Fuel Filter Replace
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Cabin Air Filter Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Cooling System Inspect
Wheel Bearing Inspect
Ball Joint Inspect
Drive/Propeller Shaft Inspect
Steering and Suspension Inspect
Tires Rotate


48000 miles or 76800 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


50000 miles or 80000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


51000 miles or 81600 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


54000 miles or 86400 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


55000 miles or 88000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


57000 miles or 91200 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


60000 miles or 96000 kilometers

Battery Check
Air Filter Element Check
Wheel Bearing Lubricate
Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Fuel Filter Replace
Spark Plug Replace
Fluid Filter - A/T Replace
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Fluid - A/T Replace
Cabin Air Filter Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Cooling System Inspect
Wheel Bearing Inspect
Ball Joint Inspect
Drive/Propeller Shaft Inspect
Exhaust System Inspect
Steering and Suspension Inspect
Heat Shield, Exhaust Inspect
Tires Rotate


63000 miles or 100800 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


65000 miles or 104000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


66000 miles or 105600 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


69000 miles or 110400 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


70000 miles or 112000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


72000 miles or 115200 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


75000 miles or 120000 kilometers

Battery Check
Air Filter Element Check
Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Fuel Filter Replace
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Cabin Air Filter Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Cooling System Inspect
Wheel Bearing Inspect
Ball Joint Inspect
Drive/Propeller Shaft Inspect
Steering and Suspension Inspect
Tires Rotate


78000 miles or 124800 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


80000 miles or 128000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
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And you can continue the pattern from there...

May 14, 2011 | Ford Focus Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Excessive play in the steering wheel, car is all over the road. What could this be?


The steering gear box is worn out. And, there's probably worn front suspension components adding to the problem. You will need to check the following parts for looseness or movement: Idler Arm, Upper and Lower Ball Joints, Control Arm Bushings, Pitman Arm, Inner and Outer Tie Rod Ends, Front Hub Bearings. All of these can be replaced in your driveway with the exception of the Control Arm Bushings which are pressed in and require special tools to remove and install the bushings. If you can't replace all of them, concentrate your efforts on the following: Steering Box, Idler arm, and Control Arm Bushings. If you can afford to have all of them done, the front suspension would be factory fresh and should, with proper wheel alignment, drive like a new car.

Dec 24, 2010 | 1996 Isuzu Trooper

1 Answer

How to replace the tie rod end


Tie rod ends are replaceable, whether the steering system is rack and pinion or parallelogram steering system.
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Some vehicles have tie rods that appear to be the same on both ends. The difference is in the threads. One end has left hand threads and the other has right hand threads. It is possible to install the entire shaft backwards (which will work). Mark the tie rod to identify the inner or ourter end before removing it.
Before tightening tie rod clamps, check to see that they are in good condition and are positioned properly so they can be clamped tightly. Before doing a front end adjustment, spray penetrating oil on the threads of the tie rods. Do this during the steering linkage inspection so the lubricant has time to soak in.

Nov 12, 2010 | 2002 Dodge Stratus

2 Answers

Any info on tie rods


You have left and right inner tie rods and outer tie rods on your car.
You also have lower ball joints which can wear loose too....not to mention the left and right struts and upper strut bearings.

A cheap (China) tie rod may last only a year.(plastic inner wear points)
A good quality tie rod may last 10.(nylon and/or metal wear points)

Oct 09, 2009 | 1991 Ford Escort

1 Answer

I need a suspension diagram that shows the Inner tie rods.


The inner tie rods are screwed into ends of the steering rack assembly.

Look at this diagram. #6 is the rubber boots and #7 is the shaft from the inner tie rods.


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Jun 08, 2009 | 2000 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

50,000 mile service


48,000 miles or 48 months
Maintenance Service Schedule 2007 dodge
Change engine oil and engine oil filter
Rotate tires
Lubricate drivetrain / steering / suspension
grease fittings (if equipped)-except Powerwagon
Lubricate front drive shaft fitting
(2500 / 3500, 4X4 & Powewagon)
Lubricate tie rod end links - Powerwagon
Check automatic transmission fluid level
Check manual transmission fluid level
Check the coolant level, hoses and clamps
Inspect exhaust system
Inspect brake hoses and brake linings
Inspect the CV joints/U-joints (if equipped) and
front suspension components
Check spare tire for proper pressure & correct
stowage
Lubricate outer tie rod ends 2500/3500 4X4

51,000 miles or 51 months
Maintenance Service Schedule
Change engine oil and engine oil filter
Lubricate drivetrain / steering / suspension
grease fittings (if equipped)-except Powerwagon
Lubricate front drive shaft fitting
(2500/3500, 4X4 & Powerwagon)
Lubricate tie rod end links - Powerwagon
Check automatic transmission fluid level
Check manual transmission fluid level
Check the coolant level, hoses and clamps
Inspect exhaust system
Inspect brake hoses
Inspect the CV joints/U-joints (if equipped) and
front suspension components

Jan 04, 2009 | 2007 Dodge Ram Truck

1 Answer

Tie Rod Ends for Ford Ranger


To be honest, I have no experience with the changes necessary when lifting a truck's suspension. All of my work on trucks has been limited to routine maintenance and repairs. With a 5.5" lift and the associated changes in suspension geometry, I wouldn't know where to start in telling you what you'd need. I don't want to steer you wrong, so I'm going to suggest you post this in the general vehicle question area for another vehicle expert to pick up on - I'm sure someone on here can tell you what you need from their own past experience.

Sorry if it's disappointed you, but I'd rather defer to someone else than tell you something that may not be correct.

Oct 16, 2008 | 2001 Ford Ranger Regular Cab

1 Answer

Steering pulls to right


it is obvious that you have an alignment issue. yes the tie rods could need replacement,however there could be other suspension/steering parts that need looked at as well. if it were a bad belt in a tire there would be a shudder to the vehicle and the sterring wheel would constqantly shake. I would suggest taking it to a shop and have the vehicle inspected for steering suspension componant failure. I would suggest taking it to a small independant shop instead of a dealership this would save you money in labor and parts costs....please rate this...........thanks

Sep 12, 2008 | 1996 Chevrolet Astro

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