Question about 1980 Cadillac Eldorado

1 Answer

Car has electrical issue

Need to know what wires going into ignition module carry voltage and how much

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Genius:

    An expert who has answered 1,000 questions.

  • Master
  • 1,198 Answers

A Haynes or Chilton manual will tell you that.

Posted on Nov 29, 2013

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
A 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
The service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

My 2001 Pontiac montana has power but wont start


Do you know how to test automotive electrical circuits ? Do you know what a electrical wiring diagram is. Have a DVOM - digital volt ohm meter ? How about a automotive relay , do you know what it is an how it works ? Free wiring diagrams here http://www.bbbind.com/free_tsb.html Enter vehicle info. year , make , model ,engine . Under system click on engine , then under subsystem click on starting. Click the search button ,then the blue link . You will see all the componets involved in starting the vehicle. ignition switch , starter range switch , starter relay , PCM -powertrain control module . When you turn the ignition switch to the start position it sends a voltage signal to the PCM , this tells the PCM start is requested , in turn the PCM energize's the starter relay . This will close contacts inside the relay allowing B+ voltage at pin 30 of the relay to go to the starter solenoid . engaging the starter . Checking fuse's an power an ground , testing relay control . . Videos on youtube for electrical testing.
Electric Testing Techniques You Need to Know
Relays Understanding Diagnosis and Testing Relayed Circuits Pt1

Sep 10, 2017 | Pontiac Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Why are my electrically powered features not working, one by one ?


I need year--make--model, to look up any wiring circuits?
Any electrical component needs voltage and ground. Battery has a full charge and battery connections all good?
Pick any component, if the voltage circuit is fused, check the fuse, also, check fuse circuit for voltage. Some fuses are hot all the time, some go hot with the key on. I wouldn't think all fuses would blow at the same time, but, any fuse that uses ignition feed, meaning the circuit goes hot with key on, if no voltage, have to check feed to and from ignition switch. I can't rule out ignition switch, itself.
If any or all of the components are controlled by a module, I can't rule out the module? I need more vehicle info?

Mar 06, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

How can I fix a no crank problem on a 003 Cadillac Cts?


Did you have the vehicles modules check for DTC'S - diagnostic trouble codes ? That's the place to start . See if a professional grade scan tool will communicate with all the modules on the vehicle > Without knowing if all modules are communicating on the class two serial data bus , you would be wasting your time testing thing's ,without knowing what is going on ,How the starting system works !
Moving the ignition switch to the START position sends a 12-volt signal to the engine control module (ECM) to command starting. Battery voltage also travels through the switch side of the Run/Crank relay then through the clutch switch, if equipped with manual transmission, and on through the coil side of the Starter relay and then to the ECM. The ECM receives class 2 information from the vehicle theft deterrent (VTD) and transmission control module (TCM) to verify that all parameters are met for starting. When all parameters are met the ECM grounds the control circuit of the Starter relay closing the switch providing battery voltage to the starter solenoid through a 30 A Maxi-Fuse.
I wouldn't think the ECM was bad , but you never know ! With a factory scan tool or a professional one you could check inputs to the ECM , is it receiving the proper inputs to initialize starting . Does you caddy have automatic transmission ? If it does there is the park neutral switch to think about . You can go to http://bbbind.com/free_tsb.html for free wiring diagrams ! Go to youtube an watch a few videos on basic automotive electrical trouble shooting , If you don't know about that sort of thing . An how to read wiring diagrams etc.. Find the ECM on the vehicle an check to see if it is receiving 12 volts from the ignition switch . Check for voltage at the starter relay too !
The data link connector (DLC) allows a scan tool to communicate with the class 2 serial data line. This serial data line is the means by which the microprocessor-controlled modules in the vehicle communicate with each other. Once the scan tool is connected to the class 2 serial data line through the DLC, the scan tool can be used to monitor each module for diagnostic purposes and to check for diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs). Class 2 serial data is transmitted on a single wire at an average of 10.4 kbps. This value is an average, class 2 uses a variable pulse width modulation to carry data and depending on the message it may operate faster or slower. The bus will float at a nominal 7.0 volts during normal operation. Each module can pull this lower during the transmission. The bus is not at battery positive voltage or ground potential during normal operation. When the ignition switch is in RUN, each module communicating on the class 2 serial data line sends a state of health (SOH) message every 2 seconds to ensure that the module is operating properly. When a module stops communicating on the class 2 serial data line, for example if the module loses power or ground, the SOH message it normally sends on the data line every 2 seconds disappears. Other modules on the class 2 serial data line, which expect to receive that SOH message, detect its absence; those modules in turn set an internal DTC associated with the loss of SOH of the non-communicating module. The DTC is unique to the module which is not communicating, for example, when the inflatable restraint sensing and diagnostic module (SDM) SOH message disappears, several modules set DTC U1088. Note that a loss of serial data DTC does not normally represent a failure of the module that set it.

Feb 12, 2016 | 2003 Cadillac CTS

1 Answer

Trying to figure out what the name of a part is


That would be the ignition coil, the part that creates spark at the spark plug. If you follow the electrical path from the coil wire to the distributor cap, and from there, the spinning rotor just under the distributor cap carries the path from the coil wire at the cap's center to the spark plug wires around the dist. cap, and through the plug wire to the spark plug.
The high voltage causing the spark is created in the ignition coil by the engine computer at the precise right moment signaling an ignition module to cut 12 volts current to the ignition coil. This causes the coil to internally build up high voltage which is passed through the coil to distributor cap wire. The computer knows the precise right moment to initiate spark from engine sensors, primarily the crank position sensor and the cam position sensor.

Nov 06, 2012 | 1999 Dodge Durango

1 Answer

05 chevy uplander no crank


anybody else seen this happen ????? their are no magical fixes for automotive electrical problems . You buy yourself a DVOM - digital volt ohm meter an test all the electrical coming into the ignition switch an going out . Do you know how to do automotive elcetrical an electronic testing ? Do you know what voltage drop is ?
Electric Testing Techniques You Need to Know Do you know what a wiring diagram is ? You can find free ones here http://www.bbbind.com/free_tsb.html Enter vehicle info. year , make , model and engine size ! Under system click on electrical distribution , under subsystem click on power distribuition ! Click the search button then the blue link. Find the ignition switch , check power in an out when trying to start the vehicle , voltage drop ! ignition switch could be bad . Do a voltage drop test on the starting circuit , bad positive or ground cable .
Starter Voltage Drop
Relay Controlled Power Mode
The body control module (BCM) uses the discrete ignition switch inputs ignition 1, ignition 3 and crank to distinguish the correct power mode. Once the BCM has determined the power mode selected by the vehicle operator it will energize the Ignition relay, Run relay and retained accessory power (RAP) relay, depending on which power mode is selected.
Your getting into thing's you have no clue about , probably ! Do you know about computer controlled thing's

Ignition 1 Relay
The relay uses a Hot At All Times B+ power source derived from the underhood electrical center. The ignition 1 relay supplies a power signal to the following circuits when the Run or Crank power mode is selected:
• AC clutch relay
• ABS STG angle sensor
• Antilock brake system (ABS) yaw sensor
• Auxiliary power drop connector
• Crank relay
• Cruse control switch
• Electronic brake control module (EBCM)
• Engine control module (ECM)
• HVAC module
• Ignition control module (ICM)
• Instrument panel cluster (IPC)
• Sensing and diagnostic module (SDM)
• Transmission solenoid circuit
Power to many of this vehicle's circuits are controlled by the module that is designated the Power Mode Master (PMM). This vehicle's PMM is the Body Control Module (BCM). The PMM controls which power mode (Run, Accessory, Crank, Retained Accessory Power, or Off) is active.
Serial Data Power Mode
On vehicles that have several control modules connected by serial data circuits, one module is the power mode master (PMM). On this vehicle, the PMM is the body control module (BCM). The PMM receives 3 discrete ignition switch signals to differentiate which power mode will be sent over the Serial Data circuits. The table below illustrates the state of these inputs in correspondence to the ignition switch position:

May 23, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2009 equinox drivers brake light keeps going out. Works for a while then just stops working. Bulb is fine. Also no brake lights will light up if the car is off. Also drivers door will not lock/unlock with...


Bad ground wire maybe for the left side brake light .ground connection G- 401 . Do you know anything about automotive electrical circuits ? B+ - voltage side an ground ?
Voltage drop testing the circuit is the way to find problems in automotive electrical circuits, plus looking at wiring diagrams so you know what wires you want to test. The brake lights won't work if the vehicle isn't on . Controlled by the BCM - body control module.

Basic Electricity for Service Techs Ohm law Current Flow Opens Shorts

Mastering Voltage Drop Testing with Pete Meier and Jerry Truglia

Electric Testing Techniques You Need to Know

Your best bet mite be to take your vehicle to a qualified repair shop . Electrical systems are very complex an could be controlled by the BCM - need a professional scan tool to diagnose this problems


Aug 30, 2017 | 2005 Chevrolet Equinox

1 Answer

Spark to distributor from coil, no spark coming from plug wires, replaced ignition module, no help


Hello Nummy.

If you have spark at the coil the module is OK. The module fires the coil.
Your problem then becomes the ignition wires, the distributor cap or the rotor.
These are the items that carry the high voltage to the spark plug.
There is also the possibility the spark is jumping off at the coil itself when all is hooked up.
This happens because the resistance increases through the wiring and jumping the gap at the spark plugs.
I hope your repair goes well. Thank you for using FixYa.

KL

Jan 15, 2011 | 1988 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

I have a 89 full size blazer, runs great for about 20 minutes then there is no throttle respond or fuel shooting from the injectors. I can turn the truck off and crank it right back up and it will run for...


The fuel injectors need voltage and ground. The voltage usually goes hot with key on and is fuse protected. When problem is ongoing, you could use a test light to check for voltage at fuel injector. Engine cranking if voltage on both wires, there is no ground. The computer grounds that circuit.
There is a purple wire with white tracer that carries rpm signal from ignition module to computer, that is rpm signal, w/o that dc pulse on that wire, the computer won't ground the fuel injector. Just my opinion. There could be a problem with your ignition module, but, I can't be certain?

Sep 26, 2017 | 1989 Chevrolet S-10 Blazer

2 Answers

Got fuel to the throttle body but still wont fire,


There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.
The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.

45ca149.jpg

da6d91b.jpg

Sep 21, 2010 | 1988 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

What would cause my car to not send spark to the spark plugs


The first thing is do you know when the last time was that the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires were changed?

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require a firing order diagram any further assistance with testing or diagnostic procedures.




42d2a26.jpg

c88274e.jpg

Jul 29, 2010 | 1995 Chevrolet Blazer

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cars & Trucks Logo

30 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Cadillac Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

79077 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22326 Answers

Ronny Bennett Sr.
Ronny Bennett Sr.

Level 3 Expert

6927 Answers

Are you a Cadillac Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...