Question about 2001 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

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View coolant system diagram

Over heating

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Thermostat, radiator fans, or most likely a broken waterpump impeller

Posted on Feb 03, 2015

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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New thermostat, new radiator, system flush, still not much heat??


You need to 'burp' the system to get air locks out.

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  • How to Burp Your Car's Cooling System ' eHow www.ehow.com > Cars > Auto Repair > Do It Yourself Auto Repair How to Burp Your Car's Cooling System. Clearing air from your car's coolant system is a fairly easy task. You need a floor jack, a set of jack stands, a helper and ...


  • Jan 27, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

    1 Answer

    How does the coolant flow on a 2001 chrysler grand caravan


    What's your problem. Where is the coolant not flowing?

    Aug 02, 2015 | 2001 Chrysler Town & Country

    1 Answer

    Need a diagram for 97 6 cyl pontiac grand am heating cooling system hoses


    We do not have these diagrams, they are located in the factory service manuals which are copyrighted by GM.

    Aug 26, 2012 | Pontiac Grand Am Cars & Trucks

    1 Answer

    Thermostat on 2005 aviator location


    Removal & Installation

    Print


    4.6L & 5.4L SOHC Engines

    1. Partially drain the engine cooling system to a level below the thermostat.
    2. Disconnect the upper radiator hose from the water outlet adapter.
    3. Remove the power steering reservoir upper mounting bracket.
    4. Remove the bolts and remove the water outlet adapter.
    5. Remove the water thermostat and the O-ring seal. Discard the O-ring seal.
    6. Installation is the reverse of the removal procedure. Tighten the water outlet adapter bolts to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm). Tighten the power steering reservoir upper mounting bracket as shown in the accompanying illustration.

      0996b43f80204ea2.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

      Fig. View of the power steering reservoir upper mounting bracket and tightening specifications


      0996b43f80204ea3.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

      Fig. Exploded view of the water outlet adapter and tightening specifications



    5.4L & 6.8L Engines

    1. Partially drain the cooling system to a level below the thermostat.
    2. Disconnect the upper radiator hose.
    3. Remove the coolant outlet connection, as follows:
      1. Remove the bolts.
      2. Remove the coolant outlet connection.

    4. Remove the (A) coolant thermostat and the (B) O-ring seal.
    5. Discard the (B) O-ring seal.

      0996b43f80204ef0.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

      Fig. Remove the (A) coolant thermostat and the (B) O-ring seal


    To install:

    NOTE Thermostat must be installed as illustrated.
    1. Use a new (A) O-ring seal to position the (B) coolant thermostat in the (C) upper intake manifold.

      0996b43f80204ef1.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

      Fig. Use a new (A) O-ring seal to position the (B) coolant thermostat in the (C) upper intake manifold

    2. Install the coolant outlet connection, as follows:
      1. Position the coolant outlet connection on the upper intake manifold.
      2. Install the bolts and tighten to 15-22 ft. lbs. (20-30 Nm).

    3. Connect the upper radiator hose.
    4. Fill the cooling system.

    1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions section.
    2. Partially drain the cooling system to a level below the thermostat.
    3. Disconnect the upper radiator hose.
    4. Remove the coolant outlet connection, as follows:
      1. Remove the bolts.
      2. Remove the coolant outlet connection.

    5. Remove the (A) coolant thermostat and the (B) O-ring seal.
    6. Discard the (B) O-ring seal.

      0996b43f80204ef0.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

      Fig. Remove the (A) coolant thermostat and the (B) O-ring seal


    To install:

    NOTE Thermostat must be installed as illustrated.
    1. Use a new (A) O-ring seal to position the (B) coolant thermostat in the (C) upper intake manifold.

      0996b43f80204ef1.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

      Fig. Use a new (A) O-ring seal to position the (B) coolant thermostat in the (C) upper intake manifold

    2. Install the coolant outlet connection, as follows:
      1. Position the coolant outlet connection on the upper intake manifold.
      2. Install the bolts and tighten to 15-22 ft. lbs. (20-30 Nm).

    3. Connect the upper radiator hose.
    4. Fill the cooling system.


    5.4L DOHC Engine

    1. Partially drain the engine cooling system to a level below the thermostat.
    2. Disconnect the upper radiator hose, the heater water inlet hose and the heated PCV inlet hose from the water outlet adapter.

      0996b43f80204ea5.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

      Fig. Disconnect the upper radiator hose, the heater water inlet hose and the heated PCV inlet hose from the water outlet adapter

    3. Remove the water hose connection and thermostat.
    4. Installation is the reverse of the removal procedure. Tighten the mounting bolt to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm).

      0996b43f80204ea4.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

      Fig. Exploded view of the thermostat-5.4L DOHC engine

    Aug 13, 2012 | 2004 Lincoln Aviator

    1 Answer

    The diagram in my haynes manual does not show some parts that are in my 2001 jetta tdi 1.9 turbo. i ran a diognostic and it says glow plug curcuit a malfunction, i changed the plugs and tested the coolant...


    In addition to the 4 primary glow plugs, the cooling system also has 3 Coolant Glow Plugs to help provide extra heat to the cooling system in order to warm-up the vehicle's interior more quickly, and enhance overall engine warm-up time. (Example - Some Mercedes diesel engines use electrical heaters in the cabin because their engine is so thermally efficient.)
    Likewise, this auxiliary source of heat from the 3 Coolant Glow Plugs is necessary because of the VW 1.9 TDI engines outstanding efficiency, which wastes very little heat.


    The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs are located at the end of the aluminum cylinder head (in a protruding flange) directly below the vacuum (brake booster) pump, which also connects to a coolant hose.

    tdisline_301.jpg
    The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs use two (underhood) relays which are monitored and controlled by the ECU. During a cold start, the vehicle's interior temperature selector switch helps the ECU choose one of three modes depending on the amount of heat required to warm-up the coolant.

    For example, Coolant Glow Plug #1 can be selected to operate all by itself, or #2 and #3 can operate together as a two-some, or lastly, all three glow plugs can form a triple source of heat for maximum enhancement of engine warm-up time.

    After the engine is completely warmed up and the thermostat is open, the Coolant Glow Plugs normally shut-off and remain off unless the (thermally efficent) engine cools down sufficiently to have the computer signal them to come back on to keep the engine and cabin air warm. Extensive idling times at stop lights or in the driveway are scenarios where these glow plugs are most likely to recycle on and off.

    In conclusion, the period of Preglow and Afterglow is determined by the engine's coolant temperature (during a cold or hot start), which helps the ECU select a predetermined time-cycle for the combustion chamber and / or Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs to follow.

    Finally, one myth that needs to be immediately debunked, is the belief that the TDI's advanced Glow Plug System is linked to the opening of the driver's side door, which is false! It is also noteworthy to mention that some earlier VW diesel glow plug systems were operated in this manner, but not so with the advanced VW Jetta 1.9 TDI engine.

    Feb 23, 2011 | Volkswagen Jetta Cars & Trucks

    2 Answers

    My heater doesn't come on for my 1997 plymouth neon, could it be a fuse?


    There are many many reasons for car heater not coming ON or not working properly:-- i will explain you the procedure to check this possibilities Your car's heater is a life saver in cold weather. Before attempting to repair your car’s heater, you should understand how your car’s heater system works. First, on this page is an explanation of how your car’s heater system functions, further down the page are some pointers on heater system trouble-shooting. To warm the passenger cabin of your car, your car’s heating system makes use of excess heat from the engine’s internal combustion process. A car’s engine, in fact, when in operation produces so much excess heat that if the excess heat is not removed, it would destroy the engine. It is your car’s cooling system that removes that dangerous excess heat. Some of an engine’s excess heat is released through the exhaust. Most of an engine’s excess heat is absorbed by a circulating liquid coolant, which is a mix of water and antifreeze.

    The heated liquid coolant is carried from the engine through hoses to the radiator, which transfers the heat from the coolant to the outside air. That heat transfer lowers the temperature of the liquid coolant, which is then circulated back to the engine to absorb excess heat again. Whereas the radiator is located at your car’s front grill, the unit that transfers heat to the passenger cabin is located inside the dashboard. This unit is something of a mini-radiator and is referred to as the heater core. Heated liquid coolant circulates through tubes in the heater core and a heater fan blowing across those tubes, as well as through little fins encasing the tubes, directs warm air through heating vents into your car’s passenger cabin. Because your car’s heating system works off of its cooling system, heating system malfunctions are often caused by problems in the cooling system.
    The heater core in your car is similar to the radiator in the front of your car; in fact it looks like a small radiator. The difference is the heater is mounted inside the car and air is blown through the fins of the core. The heater hosestransfer engine coolant from the engine to the heater core, this allows the heat from the engine coolant to be utilized and warm the passenger compartment. When a heater stops functioning determine what type of failure has occurred to execute a repair. We have listed the most common problems below.

    please click on this link directly for more detailed help
    http://www.2carpros.com/first_things/heater_failure.htm
    check the diagrams and parts in the link to troubleshoot your care heater
    This will help. Thanks please keep updated. please do rate the solution positively .thank you for using fixya

    Mar 17, 2010 | 1997 Plymouth Neon

    1 Answer

    Diagram of 2004 3800 v-6 thermostat


    sorry no diagram, but if you follow the upper radiator hose back to the engine, you will see if attaches to a small bulbous housing held on with two bolts. this is the thermostat housing. remove this and the stat sits inside. be sure to put a drain pan under the car to catch the coolant that will spill. do not reuse this coolant, top up with fresh. after everything is back together, allow car to idle with rad cap off and heat turned on with fan off to bleed coolant system. recommend performing coolant flush after completing repair.

    Dec 26, 2009 | 2004 Chevrolet Impala

    1 Answer

    New Motor, Heater not working, Leaking Antifreeze


    Your car is overheating because you did not bleed the cooling system. The hanging hose may be the overflow drain. Unbolt the coolant reservoir, and raise it as high as you can. Start the motor, and add coolant until the heater starts blowing heat. You will see air bubbles in the reservoir until all of the air is out. This is a common procedure when doing any cooling system maintenance on Celicas.

    Feb 22, 2009 | 2000 Toyota Celica

    2 Answers

    Heating System


    The Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor is mounted in the intake manifold and sends engine temperature information to the ECM. The ECM supplies 5 volts to the coolant temperature sensor circuit. The sensor is a thermistor which changes internal resistance as temperature changes. When the sensor is cold (internal resistance high), the ECM monitors a high signal voltage which it interprets as a cold engine. As the sensor warms (internal resistance low), the ECM monitors a low signal voltage which it interprets as warm engine.
    0900c1528008f125.jpgFig. 1: View of the Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor 0900c1528008f126.jpgFig. 2: Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor locationTESTING
    See Figures 3 and 4
    1. Remove the ECT sensor from the vehicle.
    2. Immerse the tip of the sensor in container of water.
    3. Connect a digital ohmmeter to the two terminals of the sensor.
    4. Using a calibrated thermometer, compare the resistance of the sensor to the temperature of the water. Refer to the engine coolant sensor temperature vs. resistance illustration.
    5. Repeat the test at two other temperature points, heating or cooling the water as necessary.
    6. If the sensor does not meet specification, it must be replaced.
    0900c1528008f120.jpgFig. 3: Intake Air Temperature (IAT) and Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor wiring diagram 0900c1528008f095.jpgFig. 4: ECT sensor temperature vs. resistance values

    Oct 01, 2008 | 1993 GMC Sierra

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