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I would like to know the position of the cam lobes when tdc on a Suzuki dr 500

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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There are two TDC's, TDC of the compression stroke, both cam lobes will be up, away from the valves. On TDC of the exhaust stroke, the exhaust lobe will be just past the exhaust valve, and the intake lobe will just be ready to open the intake valve. See, as the piston rises on the exhaust stroke, the exhaust valve is open. When piston reaches TDC, the exhaust will close, and the intake will be opening as the piston begins downward again. Coming up on the compression stroke, and on up to TDC, both valves remain closed-lobes are away from valves.

Posted on Nov 28, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

bbbman78
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I'd be careful as you know that is a zero clearance engine. Pull #1 spark plug after you get everything lined back up. Make sure it's all the way up and on the compression stroke. With #1 cam lobe up the valve should be closed and seated in the head. #1 piston should not be interfering with the valve lash. Mark the belt, cam gears, and crank clearly. This way when you pull the belt off, you can line the marks back up at any time and you won't lose any ground. What you can do is to pull the plugs and watch the cam lobes. If you have one going down, and a piston coming up...bingo that's your problem cylinder. Here's a tip from an old timer. Make sure the block timing isn't 180 degrees out. After you mark the belt and gears. Remove the belt and spin the crank 180. This will let you move the cam to close the valve on the problem cylinder while doing it. What you're experiencing is a timing issue. Figure out what that is and then line everything back up and you'll be back on the salt flats in no time. I'd be willing to bet that something is 180 degrees out no more tear down involved, just proper alignment.

Posted on Mar 07, 2010

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Posted on Jul 29, 2011

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Hi trying to set the timing on my j1 elantra its a 16 valve and each cam has two marks on it.so my question is what positions should the cam lobes be at when timing is supposed to be correct.thanks


no 1 piston tdc
the cam lobes for no 1 piston should in such a position so that a slight turn of the cam shaft one way makes the exhaust start to close and the inlet start to open or the other way the inlet start to close and the exhaust start to open
this is known as valve rock or valve overlap and occurs when the cam shaft is properly timed to the tdc position of the piston
for a twin cam engine the cam lobes position will be the same operation just that the inlet cam rock will be for the inlet cam and the exhaust cam rock will be for the exhaust cam

Dec 29, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

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How to disquinguish the intake cam from the exhaust cam,,mine got mixed up while doing a headgasket job .


the cam shaft may be identifiable but I doubt it as the lobes will be all the same .It may take a trial fitting of the cam shaft to determine which is which. Place the no 1 piston on TDC and install the cam in the exhaust side of the head. position a the no 1 piston cam lobe in the just closing position. Check where the timing mark will be in this position ( the engine make and sized would have been an enormous help here as the key position or timing mark on the gear would have revealed what cam it was). Place the other cam in the position where the no1 cam lobe is just opening.. This is called valve overlap and from the positioning of the timing marks will show if the cams should be interchanged . The marks will either both face down, face each other or face upwards. If they face out wards away from each other then interchange the the cams and if that makes the marks face each other then it may be right. Another way ( probably simpler will be to put a cam in place and the cam lobes will be directly in line with the rockers over the valves or directly over the valves. Workshop manuals are a big help when doing this work.

Oct 03, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

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How do i set timing mercedes benz e-320


easy to do ,no1 cylinder at tdc no1 and single camshaft turned till the cam lobes are where inlet has just closed and exhaust it about to open but both valves are closed ,then bring piston up to the tdc position ,pump set to spill time at no1 injector then you should see the correct marks ,turn engine over 360? by hand to ensure valves clear

Dec 26, 2010 | 1991 Mercedes-Benz 300 Diesel

1 Answer

Timeing


Doesn't matter what engine it is as long as it has valves and uses petrol (not diesel), the camshaft lobes at cylinder #1 should always face upwards. This positions the valves at it's closed setting (combustion), this is known as Top Dead Center or TDC. With this in position, all your timing markers should align on their marks (cam pulley, crankshaft pulley or flywheel ring gear). Do not confuse yourself with other cylinders being this and that, as long as number 1 cylinder is at TDC or 0* you have set your timing correctly.

Pls. give this a rating, thank you.

Jul 23, 2010 | 1995 Subaru Impreza

1 Answer

Timing belt position diagram 1994 diahatsu charade


no 1 piston at tdc and the valves on no1 piston closed with the cam lobes pointing upwards and out ,then you should see the timing marks ,have done one about a year ago but ?? old age clouds my memory

May 15, 2010 | Daihatsu Charade Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

After timing belt failure/head swap, how to tell a 94, 1.9L is at TDC? Marks on flywheel at tdc, pump timed with pin tooling, aside from cam lobes #1 both "up", I'm lost. Turn over by hand but valve...


I'd be careful as you know that is a zero clearance engine. Pull #1 spark plug after you get everything lined back up. Make sure it's all the way up and on the compression stroke. With #1 cam lobe up the valve should be closed and seated in the head. #1 piston should not be interfering with the valve lash. Mark the belt, cam gears, and crank clearly. This way when you pull the belt off, you can line the marks back up at any time and you won't lose any ground. What you can do is to pull the plugs and watch the cam lobes. If you have one going down, and a piston coming up...bingo that's your problem cylinder. Here's a tip from an old timer. Make sure the block timing isn't 180 degrees out. After you mark the belt and gears. Remove the belt and spin the crank 180. This will let you move the cam to close the valve on the problem cylinder while doing it. What you're experiencing is a timing issue. Figure out what that is and then line everything back up and you'll be back on the salt flats in no time. I'd be willing to bet that something is 180 degrees out no more tear down involved, just proper alignment.

Mar 07, 2010 | 1994 Volkswagen Jetta

1 Answer

Need timing marks for 2002 ford explorer 4.0 engine. trying 2 check timing chain. any one know specs


There are no marks on this one. There is a special tool set to align camshafts ($900). The best you can do is to bring #1 cyl to TDC compression with both cam(valve) covers off. #5 cyl should have lobes at equal opening, exhaust just closing and intake just opening.. #1 cyl cam lobes should each be diametrically opposed to the positions of #5. If cams need to be moved, there is no registration of gear onto cam. Just loosen bolt holding gear and move cam. Retighten bolt. Roll thru 2 crank revolutions and check cam timing again.Simple.

Jul 24, 2009 | 2005 Ford Explorer

1 Answer

Still need advice


Turn crank so that timing mark on front pulley is at 0 degrees.
Remove the timing cover and you should see a mark for the cam to line up with.
You want the cam lobes on No.1 cylinder to be pointing away from the followers wether they be rockers above cam or buckets below. This will be the compression stroke.
Once the cam timing is set you can recheck the distributor. It should point to No.1.

Jan 03, 2009 | 1989 Honda CRX

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