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Replacing piston rings in a B&S 14.5 OHV engine model 287707

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6ya6ya
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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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duane_wong
  • 6826 Answers

SOURCE: The engine has blown. I need to replace it or

It can be time consuming and the end result may not be desirable if you haven't done it before.
--- The following is just a sample of what to do once the engine is torn down: Pistons and Connecting Rods

  1. Before installing the piston/connecting rod assembly, oil the pistons, piston rings and the cylinder walls with light engine oil. Install connecting rod bolt protectors or rubber hose onto the connecting rod bolts/studs. Also perform the following:
    1. Select the proper ring set for the size cylinder bore.
    2. Position the ring in the bore in which it is going to be used.
    3. Push the ring down into the bore area where normal ring wear is not encountered.
    4. Use the head of the piston to position the ring in the bore so that the ring is square with the cylinder wall. Use caution to avoid damage to the ring or cylinder bore.
    5. Measure the gap between the ends of the ring with a feeler gauge. Ring gap in a worn cylinder is normally greater than specification. If the ring gap is greater than the specified limits, try an oversize ring set. Fig. 5: Checking the piston ring-to-ring groove side clearance using the ring and a feeler gauge tccs3923.gif

    6. Check the ring side clearance of the compression rings with a feeler gauge inserted between the ring and its lower land according to specification. The gauge should slide freely around the entire ring circumference without binding. Any wear that occurs will form a step at the inner portion of the lower land. If the lower lands have high steps, the piston should be replaced. Fig. 6: The notch on the side of the bearing cap matches the tang on the bearing insert tccs3917.gif

  2. Unless new pistons are installed, be sure to install the pistons in the cylinders from which they were removed. The numbers on the connecting rod and bearing cap must be on the same side when installed in the cylinder bore. If a connecting rod is ever transposed from one engine or cylinder to another, new bearings should be fitted and the connecting rod should be numbered to correspond with the new cylinder number. The notch on the piston head goes toward the front of the engine.
  3. Install all of the rod bearing inserts into the rods and caps. Fig. 7: Most rings are marked to show which side of the ring should face up when installed to the piston tccs3222.gif

  4. Install the rings to the pistons. Install the oil control ring first, then the second compression ring and finally the top compression ring. Use a piston ring expander tool to aid in installation and to help reduce the chance of breakage. Fig. 8: Install the piston and rod assembly into the block using a ring compressor and the handle of a hammer tccs3914.gif

  5. Make sure the ring gaps are properly spaced around the circumference of the piston. Fit a piston ring compressor around the piston and slide the piston and connecting rod assembly down into the cylinder bore, pushing it in with the wooden hammer handle. Push the piston down until it is only slightly below the top of the cylinder bore. Guide the connecting rod onto the crankshaft bearing journal carefully, to avoid damaging the crankshaft.
  6. Check the bearing clearance of all the rod bearings, fitting them to the crankshaft bearing journals. Follow the procedure in the crankshaft installation above.
  7. After the bearings have been fitted, apply a light coating of assembly oil to the journals and bearings.
  8. Turn the crankshaft until the appropriate bearing journal is at the bottom of its stroke, then push the piston assembly all the way down until the connecting rod bearing seats on the crankshaft journal. Be careful not to allow the bearing cap screws to strike the crankshaft bearing journals and damage them.
  9. After the piston and connecting rod assemblies have been installed, check the connecting rod side clearance on each crankshaft journal.
  10. Prime and install the oil pump and the oil pump intake tube.
  11. Install the auxiliary/balance shaft(s)/assembly(ies).
OHV Engines CAMSHAFT, LIFTERS AND TIMING ASSEMBLY
  1. Install the camshaft.
  2. Install the lifters/followers into their bores.
  3. Install the timing gears/chain assembly.
CYLINDER HEAD(S)
  1. Install the cylinder head(s) using new gaskets.
  2. Assemble the rest of the valve train (pushrods and rocker arms and/or shafts).
OHC Engines CYLINDER HEAD(S)
  1. Install the cylinder head(s) using new gaskets.
  2. Install the timing sprockets/gears and the belt/chain assemblies.
Engine Covers and Components Install the timing cover(s) and oil pan. Refer to your notes and drawings made prior to disassembly and install all of the components that were removed. Install the engine into the vehicle. Engine Start-up and Break-in STARTING THE ENGINE Now that the engine is installed and every wire and hose is properly connected, go back and double check that all coolant and vacuum hoses are connected. Check that your oil drain plug is installed and properly tightened. If not already done, install a new oil filter onto the engine. Fill the crankcase with the proper amount and grade of engine oil. Fill the cooling system with a 50/50 mixture of coolant/water.
  1. Connect the vehicle battery.
  2. Start the engine. Keep your eye on your oil pressure indicator; if it does not indicate oil pressure within 10 seconds of starting, turn the vehicle OFF. WARNING
    Damage to the engine can result if it is allowed to run with no oil pressure. Check the engine oil level to make sure that it is full. Check for any leaks and if found, repair the leaks before continuing. If there is still no indication of oil pressure, you may need to prime the system.
  3. Confirm that there are no fluid leaks (oil or other).
  4. Allow the engine to reach normal operating temperature (the upper radiator hose will be hot to the touch).
  5. At this point any necessary checks or adjustments can be performed, such as ignition timing.
  6. Install any remaining components or body panels which were removed. prev.gif next.gif

Posted on Oct 17, 2010

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markmayes66
  • 786 Answers

SOURCE: Toyota tercel 1988, engine knock. Replaced pistons rings and con rod brgs. Engine still has knock but not as survier. Has anybody changed main bearings with engine installed?

You will have to remove crank to replace and removing motor would be my suggestion...Would also suggest having the crank turned.......hope this info helps and good luck......please rate my post....

Posted on Aug 17, 2012

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1 Answer

What parts are needed to replace piston rings while engine is in the car


Head Gasket
Rocker cover gasket
Inlet & exhaust manifold gaskets
Main and Big end bearings
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Apr 25, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

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I have been told my piston rings have gone does that mean i have to change the whole engine or can it be fixed


You didn't specify the # of cylinders or the make/model. Piston rings are replaceable, BUT without knowing how they were tested I'm speculating, They all should be around 90-100 psi. (Pounds per square inch) The only thing I would add, this is supposing the head gasket and valves are okay. Even with that the pressure in all the cylinders should all be within 20 psi of each other. A dealer would scare me. They may want to rebuid or replace the engine. Being a 2011, unless it has high mileage and no other problems, this can be caused by a bad oil pump. If you or someone you know can think of a garage that has rebuilt engines, see what they say. With the right knowledge and the right testing equipment, it is more likely that you can get an idea what all can be wrong. (Piston rings that are bad usually results in a blue color exaust.) Attached is an article from Popular Mechanics. 25275235-bi3we4vgns1os3cq2ej15uv2-2-0.jpg

Nov 08, 2014 | Skoda Octavia Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Replacing piston rings


Remove engine. Dissassemble. Remove pistons. Install new rings. Reinstall pistons. Reassemble engine. Install engine.

Aug 31, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

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Excessive fuel consumption and fuel in oil with a 89 2.9


Is your car petrol or Diesel? If diesel then your piston rings are finished.check your engine oil level,drive for a while and check again ,if level is higher then you definately need to overhaul your piston rings.Hope it helps.
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Mar 13, 2013 | 1989 Ford Ranger

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Problem with 2001 Prizm '01 Prizm 5 spd: piston ring change possible without pulling engine (Toyota 1zzfe) Posted by Guest on 11/29/2012 Details '01 Prizm 5 spd: piston ring change possible w


If you unbolt the con rod bearings and push the piston out of the bores, then the rings can be changed but the bores MUST be honed at the same time.

Oct 28, 2017 | 2001 Chevrolet Prizm

1 Answer

Have oil in one of the spark plug cylinders what would be causing this ?


broken/worn piston ring(s). Each piston has 2 rings. These can be replaced by the DIY mechanic by
1) removing head of engine (remove head gasket - you'll replace it), then
2) manually wind the engine (with a ratchet wrench & socket) til the piston in question pops up
3) remove both rings (with ring pliers - available from any auto parts store)
4) install 2 new rings (with a ring installation collar - available at any auto parts store)
--- choose ring installation tool to the correct size for your pistons.
5) re-install head of engine (replacing head gasket)

Note that this procedure preserves the engine timing, so you need not reset it.

Dec 27, 2010 | 1997 Toyota Avalon

1 Answer

The engine has blown. I need to replace it or change pistons and rings. How difficult is it to change pistons and rings?


It can be time consuming and the end result may not be desirable if you haven't done it before.
--- The following is just a sample of what to do once the engine is torn down: Pistons and Connecting Rods
  1. Before installing the piston/connecting rod assembly, oil the pistons, piston rings and the cylinder walls with light engine oil. Install connecting rod bolt protectors or rubber hose onto the connecting rod bolts/studs. Also perform the following:
    1. Select the proper ring set for the size cylinder bore.
    2. Position the ring in the bore in which it is going to be used.
    3. Push the ring down into the bore area where normal ring wear is not encountered.
    4. Use the head of the piston to position the ring in the bore so that the ring is square with the cylinder wall. Use caution to avoid damage to the ring or cylinder bore.
    5. Measure the gap between the ends of the ring with a feeler gauge. Ring gap in a worn cylinder is normally greater than specification. If the ring gap is greater than the specified limits, try an oversize ring set. Fig. 5: Checking the piston ring-to-ring groove side clearance using the ring and a feeler gauge tccs3923.gif

    6. Check the ring side clearance of the compression rings with a feeler gauge inserted between the ring and its lower land according to specification. The gauge should slide freely around the entire ring circumference without binding. Any wear that occurs will form a step at the inner portion of the lower land. If the lower lands have high steps, the piston should be replaced. Fig. 6: The notch on the side of the bearing cap matches the tang on the bearing insert tccs3917.gif

  2. Unless new pistons are installed, be sure to install the pistons in the cylinders from which they were removed. The numbers on the connecting rod and bearing cap must be on the same side when installed in the cylinder bore. If a connecting rod is ever transposed from one engine or cylinder to another, new bearings should be fitted and the connecting rod should be numbered to correspond with the new cylinder number. The notch on the piston head goes toward the front of the engine.
  3. Install all of the rod bearing inserts into the rods and caps. Fig. 7: Most rings are marked to show which side of the ring should face up when installed to the piston tccs3222.gif

  4. Install the rings to the pistons. Install the oil control ring first, then the second compression ring and finally the top compression ring. Use a piston ring expander tool to aid in installation and to help reduce the chance of breakage. Fig. 8: Install the piston and rod assembly into the block using a ring compressor and the handle of a hammer tccs3914.gif

  5. Make sure the ring gaps are properly spaced around the circumference of the piston. Fit a piston ring compressor around the piston and slide the piston and connecting rod assembly down into the cylinder bore, pushing it in with the wooden hammer handle. Push the piston down until it is only slightly below the top of the cylinder bore. Guide the connecting rod onto the crankshaft bearing journal carefully, to avoid damaging the crankshaft.
  6. Check the bearing clearance of all the rod bearings, fitting them to the crankshaft bearing journals. Follow the procedure in the crankshaft installation above.
  7. After the bearings have been fitted, apply a light coating of assembly oil to the journals and bearings.
  8. Turn the crankshaft until the appropriate bearing journal is at the bottom of its stroke, then push the piston assembly all the way down until the connecting rod bearing seats on the crankshaft journal. Be careful not to allow the bearing cap screws to strike the crankshaft bearing journals and damage them.
  9. After the piston and connecting rod assemblies have been installed, check the connecting rod side clearance on each crankshaft journal.
  10. Prime and install the oil pump and the oil pump intake tube.
  11. Install the auxiliary/balance shaft(s)/assembly(ies).
OHV Engines CAMSHAFT, LIFTERS AND TIMING ASSEMBLY
  1. Install the camshaft.
  2. Install the lifters/followers into their bores.
  3. Install the timing gears/chain assembly.
CYLINDER HEAD(S)
  1. Install the cylinder head(s) using new gaskets.
  2. Assemble the rest of the valve train (pushrods and rocker arms and/or shafts).
OHC Engines CYLINDER HEAD(S)
  1. Install the cylinder head(s) using new gaskets.
  2. Install the timing sprockets/gears and the belt/chain assemblies.
Engine Covers and Components Install the timing cover(s) and oil pan. Refer to your notes and drawings made prior to disassembly and install all of the components that were removed. Install the engine into the vehicle. Engine Start-up and Break-in STARTING THE ENGINE Now that the engine is installed and every wire and hose is properly connected, go back and double check that all coolant and vacuum hoses are connected. Check that your oil drain plug is installed and properly tightened. If not already done, install a new oil filter onto the engine. Fill the crankcase with the proper amount and grade of engine oil. Fill the cooling system with a 50/50 mixture of coolant/water.
  1. Connect the vehicle battery.
  2. Start the engine. Keep your eye on your oil pressure indicator; if it does not indicate oil pressure within 10 seconds of starting, turn the vehicle OFF. WARNING
    Damage to the engine can result if it is allowed to run with no oil pressure. Check the engine oil level to make sure that it is full. Check for any leaks and if found, repair the leaks before continuing. If there is still no indication of oil pressure, you may need to prime the system.
  3. Confirm that there are no fluid leaks (oil or other).
  4. Allow the engine to reach normal operating temperature (the upper radiator hose will be hot to the touch).
  5. At this point any necessary checks or adjustments can be performed, such as ignition timing.
  6. Install any remaining components or body panels which were removed. prev.gif next.gif

Oct 17, 2010 | 1995 Ford Thunderbird

1 Answer

Replaced to valves on center piston on 1990 geo


timming is not the issue, sounds like the valve seals are leaking, or the piston rings are severly worn. these engines are fairly simple to just rebuild the entire engine.....ie...seals,rings gaskets, maybe a have the head dropped off and have it checked for cracks or warpage.

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1 Answer

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