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Erratic idle Idle speed drops suddenly then returns the drops again then returns. almost like ignition is being shut off for a second. Replaced EGR valve. Self test shows 1-1-1

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You have a idle control valve on there .I would start there.

Posted on Nov 26, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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godspeed808
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SOURCE: olds alero 2.4 idle fuel pressure

most likely idle air control sensor or low engine coolant I know sounds funny but IAC uses coolant to regulate idle. Idle air control valve or throttle body positioning sensor.

Posted on Feb 26, 2009

  • 9 Answers

SOURCE: 1991 geo storm stalling at idle

maybe try replaceing the ingnition modual. that part can do a lot of weird things to these cars. its located inside the distributor cap, really easy to do. about $40 and 10 mins or less. sometimes as they start to fail they do odd things sometimes but not always

Posted on Mar 18, 2009

  • 71 Answers

SOURCE: Idle drops really low then returns to normal afew times b4 cutout

my buddies 94 350 has been doing the same thing for years i think its in the computer i would say youll probably have to live with it

Posted on Mar 27, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Saturn 2001 SL code showing high idle misfire cyl,1 egr valve

i had that problem, you need to get your head gasket replace.

Posted on Mar 28, 2009

bryan7953
  • 7 Answers

SOURCE: 2.5l iron duke will not idle

Scan again & check reading of the ECT sensor,coolent sensor as it may be reading to cold for present temp & just dumping fuel as it is seeing -30c all the time.I as well own a iron duke(1987)

Posted on Apr 07, 2009

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2 Answers

1985mazdarx713bwontidle


get a workshop manual and read how to adjust the engine speed screw and the mixture screw
idle speed is around 900 rpms
have the carby overhauled
check for vacuum leaks
could be a faulty EGR valve

Nov 16, 2015 | 1985 Mazda RX-7

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EGR faults


1.6b) Symptoms of faulty EGR
Associated OBD2 error codes DTCs: P0400 - P0409; P1403 - P1409 other common codes can include 'multiple misfire P0300'

The EGR has two possible fault modes either it is 1) open when it should be closed or 2) closed when it should be open. (See also DPFE faults)

'Open' faults
  • Erratic idling: 'hunts' at idle with erratic engine performance when running. This is due to the air ingress through the split diaphragm or the EGR valve being left open, either event compromises the intake manifold vacuum and in turn this interferes with the ECU's ability to deliver accurate fuel to air ratio for a given engine speed.
  • Sudden engine stall: In addition to the rough idle, a hot running engine when quickly brought to idle (after the car comes to a halt at a junction) can stumble and then stall. The engine will hesitantly restart immediately: this is significant difference to Crank and Camsensor error.

'Closed' faults
  • Misfire and 'pinking': if the EGR is jammed closed or the exhaust feed pipe is blocked (with baked on carbon deposits) the engine runs lean and very hot, so hot in fact that the fuel air mix in the cylinder can spontaneously ignite causing a misfire. The misfire if pronounced can, in turn, be detected by the engine knock sensors (P0300) leading to a 'check engine light' warning and reduced engine speed limitations.
Inherently diesel engines create more soot in the exhaust and as a result blocked EGR assemblies are more common in diesels than petrol engines.
  • Burnt Exhaust Valves. Prolonged exposure to excessively high ignition temperatures brought about by a blocked EGR system can lead to exhaust valves being over heated to the extent that they become distorted and so no longer seat properly. Poorly seated valves prevent good compression.
  • Surging: A sticking EGR valve can lead to an effect of rhythmic surging a bit like the MAF fault, especially in turbo charged engines. Normally on a warmed up engine the vacuum from the inlet manifold opens the EGR. If the EGR fails to open promptly the turbo can be subject to a slight boost. Extra fuel/air mix is pushed into the inlet manifold as a result, increasing pressure (decreasing the vacuum). Without vacuum in the inlet manifold the EGR closes again but if sticky only does so slowly. This may allow inlet gases to flow through the EGR into the exhaust manifold for a split second. There is a time lag in the sequence of these events leading the engine to surge in cyclical manner.
NEXT 1.6c) EGR how to fix



on Jul 15, 2011 | Mercedes-Benz E-Class Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Erratic idle & shutting off


have you replaced the egr valve

Feb 08, 2014 | 1990 Ford F150

1 Answer

Acceleration problems ,at hiway speeds, needing more speed car downshifts sputters misses then eventually snaps backto normal whats up?


Ok. I'll give you my best guess, although I am not a Dodge Stratus expert. Based upon your description of the problem, I am to assume that the vehicle has problems accelerating up to speed, but once there, cruises ok unless you are going uphill or need to accelerate quickly, then power falls off rapidly and acceleration returns very slowly. If that is accurate, I would suspect the EGR valve. This is because at ihighway cruising speeds the EGR valve is pretty much wide open, letting exhaust gases back into the intake. When you need to accelerate, pressing the accelerator results in intake vacuum drop. This is partially compensated for by closing the EGR valve. If the EGR fails to close or sticks partway open, the exhaust gases will lower intake vacuum even further, and rob engine power. This can also cause the onboard computer to force a downshift to the transmission, as vacuum sensors are used to determine engine loading and the need to reduce gearing. In addition, a partially open EGR valve can cause erratic idle as it affects static intake vacuum (EGR is normally closed at idle) and the onboard computer must continually compensate, resulting is unstable idling.

Dec 04, 2011 | Dodge Stratus Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Check engine light on egr code


Check the EGR valve for functioning:

COMPONENT TESTING DPFE Sensor
  1. Disconnect the pressure hoses at the DPFE sensor.
  2. Connect a hand vacuum pump to the downstream pickup marked REF on the sensor.
  3. Using a multimeter, backprobe the SIG RTN circuit at the DPFE connector.
  4. With the ignition ON, signal voltage should be 0.20-0.70 volts.
  5. Apply 8-9 in. Hg of vacuum to the sensor. Voltage should be greater than 4 volts.
  6. Quickly release the vacuum from the sensor. Voltage should drop to less than 1 volt in 3 seconds.
  7. If the sensor does not respond as specified, check the power and ground circuits.
  8. If power and ground circuits are functional, the sensor is faulty.
EVR Solenoid
  1. Remove the EVR solenoid.
  2. Attempt to lightly blow air into the EVR solenoid.
    1. If air blows through the solenoid, replace the solenoid with a new one.
    2. If air does not pass freely through the solenoid, continue with the test.
  3. Apply battery voltage (approximately 12 volts) and a ground to the EVR solenoid electrical terminals. Attempt to lightly blow air, once again, through the solenoid.
    1. If air does not pass through the solenoid, replace the solenoid with a new one.
    2. If air does not flow through the solenoid, the solenoid is OK.
  4. If the solenoid is functional but the problem still exists, check the power and ground circuits.
EGR Valve
  1. Install a tachometer on the engine, following the manufacturer's instructions.
  2. Detach the engine wiring harness connector from the Idle Air Control (IAC) solenoid.
  3. Disconnect and plug the vacuum supply hose from the EGR valve.
  4. Start the engine, then apply the parking brake, block the rear wheels and position the transmission in Neutral.
  5. Observe and note the idle speed. NOTE: If the engine will not idle with the IAC solenoid disconnected, provide an air bypass to the engine by slightly opening the throttle plate or by creating an intake vacuum leak. Do not allow the idle speed to exceed typical idle rpm.
  6. Using a hand-held vacuum pump, slowly apply 5-10 in. Hg (17-34 kPa) of vacuum to the EGR valve nipple.
    1. If the idle speed drops more than 100 rpm with the vacuum applied and returns to normal after the vacuum is removed, the EGR valve is OK.
    2. If the idle speed does not drop more than 100 rpm with the vacuum applied and return to normal after the vacuum is removed, inspect the EGR valve for a blockage; clean it if a blockage is found. Replace the EGR valve if no blockage is found, or if cleaning the valve does not remedy the malfunction. ---

Sep 24, 2010 | 2000 Mercury Cougar

2 Answers

Idle fluxuates up and down consistantly


Check the Idle Control System

Idle speed is controlled by the Idle Air Control Valve (IACV). The IACV changes the amount of air being bypassed to the intake manifold, in response to electric current controlled by the ECM. When the IACV is activated, the valve opens to maintain proper idle speed.

Symptom and Subsystems to Check:

1. Difficult to start engine, when cold--check Fast Idle Thermo Valve.

2. Fast idle out of spec, when cold:
a. Check Fast Idle Thermo Valve.
b. Check IACV.
c. Check idle adjusting screw (see Section C).

3. Rough idle:
a. Check hoses and connections.
b. Check IACV.

4. RPM too high, when warm:
a. Check IACV.
b. Check Fast Idle Thermo Valve.
c. Check hoses and connections, check Power Steering Pressure Switch Signal, and check idle adjusting screw.

5. RPM too low, when warm:
a. Idle speed is below specified rpm, with no load--check IACV and idle adjusting screw.
b. Idle speed doesn't increase after initial start up--check IACV.
c. Idle speed drops in gear (automatic transmission)--check automatic transaxle gear position switch signal.
d. Idle speed drops when AC is on--check air conditioning signal and IACV.
e. Idle speed drops when steering wheel is turned--check power steering pressure switch signal and IACV.
f. Idle speed fluctuates with electrical load--check hoses and connections, IACV, and Alternator FR Signal.

6. Frequent stalling, while warming up--check IACV and idle adjusting screw.

7. Frequent stalling, after warming up--check idle adjusting screw and IACV.

Additional Steps:

. Check Alternator FR Signal. Have alternator inspected, if idle speed fluctuates with electrical load. The FR signal communicates to the ECM how "hard" the alternator is working to meet the electrical demands of the car, including the battery and any loads which aren't monitored by the ELD. This square-wave signal varies in pulse width, according to the load on the alternator. The ECM places, approximately, 5 reference volts on the wire. The voltage regulator will drop this signal to approximately 1.2 volts, in proportion to alternator load. The ECM compares the electrical load (ELD) signal with the FR (Charging Rate) signal from the alternator and uses that information to set the idle speed and turn the alternator on and off. This helps fuel economy.

. Clean main ECM ground on thermostat housing.

. Reset ECM, by removing the 7.5 amp Back Up Fuse, in the under-hood fuse box, for 10 seconds.

. Replace PCV Valve, cleaning hose with brake cleaner spray.

. Substitute a known-good ECM. If symptom goes away, replace original ECM.

Check the ICM (Erratic RPM and PGM-FI System)

When the engine is cold, the air conditioner compressor is on, the transmission is in gear (automatic transmission only) or the alternator is charging, the ECM controls current to the Idle Air Control (IAC) Valve to maintain correct idle speed. Here's an overview of how the PGM-FI System works.

Background:

Various inputs to the ECM are TDC/CKP/CYP Sensor, MAP Sensor, ECT Sensor, IAT Sensor, TP Sensor, HO2S, VSS, BARO Sensor, EGR Valve Lift Sensor, Starter Signal, Alternator FR Signal, Air Conditioning Signal, Automatic Transmission Shift Position Signal, Battery Voltage (Ignition 1) Brake Switch Signal, PSP Switch Signal, ELD, and VTEC Pressure Switch.

Inputs are received and processed by the ECM's Fuel Injector Timing and Duration, Electronic Idle Control, Other Control Functions, Ignition Timing Control, and ECM Back-up Functions. These are the primary functional areas within the ECM.

Outputs from the ECM control Fuel Injectors, PGM-FI Main Relay (Fuel Pump), MIL (Check Engine Light), Idle Air Control (IAC) Valve, A/C Compressor Clutch Relay, Ignition Control Module (ICM), EVAP Purge Control Solenoid Valve, HO2S Heater, EGR Control Solenoid Valve, Alternator, Lock-up Solenoid Valve A/B (A/T), VTEC Solenoid Valve, and Interlock Control Unit.

Idle RPM:

Once you understand how the PGM-FI system is configured, it's easy to see how the ECM, Idle Air Control Valve, and the Ignition Control Module affect idle rpm. If the ECM's Electronic Idle Control function is not working properly, then it cannot properly control the IAC Valve. Likewise, if the ECM's Ignition Timing Control function is not operating properly, it cannot properly control the ICM (igniter). Obviously, idle rpm will also be affected if there's a problem with the IAC Valve or the ICM. As stated above, the ECM controls current to the Idle Air Control (IAC) Valve to maintain correct idle speed. This cannot happen if the IAC Valve is failing. The same situation exists if the ICM is failing. The ECM will tell the ICM to open and close the primary voltage circuit going to the coil and it won't respond properly. The result will be erratic spark plug firing and erratic rpm.

Conclusion:

If you are experiencing erratic idle rpm, try and isolate whether the problem is caused by the ICM (ignitor), IAC Valve, or the ECM. My experience has been that a failing ICM is usually responsible for the problem. Keep in mind that tachometers are connected directly to the ICM. Therefore, a fluctuating tachometer needle is often a dead giveaway. Heat and poor preventive maintenance (causing high secondary voltage to be discharge on internal distributor components) frequently causes the ICM (and coil) to fail. Besides performance, this is another reason why it's important to regularly replace spark plugs, spark plug wires, rotors, and distributor caps. Electricity will always follow the path of least resistance, even if it isn't the intended one. Our job is to ensure the intended path is the path of least resistance.

Ignitor (ICM) and Coil Replacement:

1. Disconnect negative battery cable.
2. Remove hex head machine screws, securing distributor cap to housing, using an 8 mm nut driver.
3. Move distributor cap and wires off to the side.
4. Remove machine screw securing rotor to shaft, using a #2 Phillips head screwdriver. It may be necessary to "hit" the starter once or twice, in order to rotate rotor for access to mounting screw.
5. Remove rotor and leak cover.
6. Unfasten ignitor wires, remove coil mounting screws, and set coil aside. Note: Removing coil first improves access to igniter.
7. Unfasten screws securing igniter to housing.
8. Remove ignitor from distributor and unfasten screws mounting ignitor to heat sink.
9. Coat back of new ignitor (or old igniter, if reusing) and male connectors with silicone grease. Silicone grease increases heat transfer to heat sink. Failure to apply silicone grease will cause the ignitor to quickly fail.
10. Mount ignitor to heat sink and reinstall ignitor, igniter terminal wires, coil, coil wires, leak cover, rotor, and distributor cap. Ensure female ignitor terminals fit snugly--crimp with pliers, if necessary.

AutoZone can test ICMs and coils for free. If you plan to keep the car, I would replace the ICM due the age of your Civic.

Sep 15, 2010 | 1991 Honda Civic

1 Answer

Starts/stalls won't run until pedal tapped, 2 miles in town, 6 miles highway, then1000-1500 idle. shut down 9 hours, start/stall tap pedal runs return 6 mi. highway,2miles town same high idle. checked code...


Check your IAC motor (Idle Air Control) It could be sticking open.
Ps. Might be called Idle Speed Control motor it depends on the make and i forget what chevy calls theres.

Mar 11, 2010 | 2000 Chevrolet Malibu

1 Answer

Idle problem


check the airflow meter it may be stuck and make sure the electrical connection to it is not loose and also check the hose leading to it are not loose or cracked they tend to crack at the bottom where you cannot see it unless you remove it and check

May 21, 2009 | 1999 BMW 318 ti

2 Answers

1997 ford ranger idol problems


MIGHT be the tps
The TPS is sensitive to heat, moisture and vibration leading to the failure of some units. The sensor is a sealed unit and cannot be repaired only replaced. A TPS may fail gradually leading to a number of symptoms which can include one or more of the following: -
  • Poor idle control: The TPS is used by the ECU to determine if the throttle is closed and the car should be using the Idle Air Control Valve exclusively for idle control. A fault TPS sensor can confuse the ECU causing the idle to be erratic or "hunting".
  • High Idle Speed: The TPS may report faulty values causing the engine idle speed to be increased above normal. This is normally found in conjunction with a slow engine return to idle speed symptom.
  • Slow engine return to idle: A failing TPS can report the minimum throttle position values incorrectly which can stop the engine entering idle mode when the throttle is closed. Normally when the throttle is closed the engine fuel injectors will be deactivated until a defined engine RPM speed is reached and the engine brought smoothly to idle speed. When failing a TPS will not report the throttle closed and fueling will continue causing the engine to return to idle very slowly.
  • Engine Hesitation on Throttle Application: The TPS is also used by the ECU to determine if the driver has applied the throttle quicker than the Manifold Air Pressure sensor can read. The fueling is adjusted acordingly to cope with the sudden increase in air volume, however a faulty sensor can cause the ECU to ignore this data and the engine will "hesitate" when applying the throttle. In extreme cases with the engine at idle, a sudden application of full throttle can stall the engine.
  • Engine Misfire: A fault TPS can report values outside the deined acceptable range causing the ECU to incorrectly fuel the engine. This is noticable as a slight misfire and can trigger the misfire detection software and/or Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) light on the dashboard. Extreme cases can cause excessing misfires resulting in one or more cylinders being shut down to prevent engine and catalytic converter damage.
[edit] Manual recalibration In all cases a manual recalibration of the TPS may resolve the issues at least on a temporary basis. To recalibrate the TPS: -
  1. With the engine off, insert the key and turn the ignition to position 2 (On) without starting the engine.
  2. For MEMS-equipped cars (S1), quickly press and release the accelerator pedal several times (at least 5, but to be sure 8 or 9) using as much of the throttle travel as practicable. This will trigger the ECU into the closed-throttle reference learn algorithm, which has it looking for the lowest measured static throttle position (the closed position). The throttle position calibration is a fixed definition from this point.
  3. Turn the ignition off, remove the key and wait for the ECU to power down (about 30-40s).
  4. Start car as normal.

Feb 26, 2009 | 1996 Ford Explorer

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