Question about 2004 Dodge Ram 1500

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Original error was cylinder 1 misfire, changed all spark plugs, now I get the messages 2302 2305 and 2311 coil a, b, and d secondary circuit. Any suggestions.

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  • Dodge Master
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Check coils bad coil cause misfire.

Posted on May 08, 2009

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I have a misfiring problems with cylinders 1 and 6. Which ignition coil do i need to change?


Ignition coil one and six or course.The 3.7L uses separate ignition coils for each cylinder. The one-piece coil bolts directly to the cylinder head. Rubber boots seal the secondary terminal ends of the coils to the top of all 6 spark plugs. A separate electrical connector is used for each coil.
Because of coil design, spark plug cables (secondary cables) and a distributor are not used.
Two knock sensors (one for each cylinder bank) are used to help control spark knock.
The Auto Shutdown (ASD) relay provides battery voltage to each ignition coil.
The ignition system consists of:
² 6 Spark Plugs
² 6 Separate Ignition Coils
² 2 Knock Sensors
² Powertrain Control Module (PCM

Dec 10, 2016 | Jeep Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2006 grand prix gxp 5.3. When you are driving normally it will miss from 50mph and up. When you punch it it doesn't miss a beat. I cleaned the maf sensor and air filter, Plugs were replaced.


It's probably a coil breaking down , have a scan tool hooked up an have misfires checked to see which cylinder is missing .
Ignition Coils
Each ignition coil has an ignition 1 voltage feed and a ground. The engine control module (ECM) supplies a low reference and an ignition control (IC) circuit. Each ignition coil contains a solid state driver module. The ECM will command the IC circuit ON, this allows the current to flow through the primary coil windings for the appropriate time or dwell. When the ECM commands the IC circuit OFF, this will interrupt current flow through the primary coil windings. The magnetic field created by the primary coil windings will collapse across the secondary coil windings, which induces a high voltage across the spark plug electrodes. The coils are current limited to prevent overloading if the IC current is held high too long. The spark plugs are connected to their respective coils by a short secondary wire. The spark plugs are tipped with iridium for long life and efficiency.
Drive it long enough like that (with it misfiring ) the check engine light will flash . This is to warn that a catalytic converter damaging event is taking place . This would also set a DTC - diagnostic trouble code
DTC Descriptors ?€¢
DTC P0300 Engine Misfire Detected


?€¢
DTC P0301 Cylinder 1 Misfire Detected


?€¢
DTC P0302 Cylinder 2 Misfire Detected


?€¢
DTC P0303 Cylinder 3 Misfire Detected


?€¢
DTC P0304 Cylinder 4 Misfire Detected


?€¢
DTC P0305 Cylinder 5 Misfire Detected


?€¢
DTC P0306 Cylinder 6 Misfire Detected


?€¢
DTC P0307 Cylinder 7 Misfire Detected


?€¢
DTC P0308 Cylinder 8 Misfire Detected

Apr 26, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Toyota camry with codes obd codes p0300 - p0306 and p0354?


The car needs carlibration,the code means random cylinder misfire.fuel line need and MAF need check

Sep 05, 2014 | 2007 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

Bad ignition control module act


same car as one of mine.
so you change coil packs before spark plugs?
i have the full fsm too, /.7000 pages long..... im scanning now.
you do know this is a wasted spark system so both side can fail, right.
coil pack 1.side runs 2 cylinders. not one.
both spark plugs connected to #1 coil are suspect.
they do not say how the the test is conducted (inane that)
only the useless Burn time , bull.
most times only the possible cause list is a clue to the test.

verbatim. page 4204
MONITOR CONDITIONS
When Monitored:
Engine running and battery voltage greater than 10 volts.
SET CONDITIONS
Set Condition:
If PCM detects that the secondary ignition burn time is incorrect, too short, or not present, an error is
detected. One Trip Fault. Three good trips to turn off the MIL.
POSSIBLE CAUSES
(F342) ASD OUTPUT CIRCUIT
(K19) COIL CONTROL 1 CIRCUIT OPEN
(K19) COIL CONTROL 1 CIRCUIT SHORTED TO GROUND
COIL
POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM)
, then a list of tests to do. in the FSM , get one.


my wild guess is the PCM ,charges the coil for DWELL time
then monitors both the low and the high signals.
if the signal is stuck low, or high this sets.
coil primary.
i think they mean coil charging fails....

Mar 07, 2014 | Jeep Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Hi my 2006 cadillac cts has error codes po 300 303 305 343 347 368 392 and 496 can u tell me what they are or a website to find out thank u


P0300 is multiple engine misfire detected
P0303 is misfire in cylinder 3
P0305 is misfire in cylinder 5
P0343 is camshaft position sensor A (bank 1)
P0347 is camshaft position sensor A (bank 2)
P0368 is camshaft position sensor B (bank 1)
P0392 is camshaft position sensor B (bank2)
P0496 is EVAP Canister Purge System High Purge Flow

Jan 28, 2011 | 2006 Cadillac CTS

1 Answer

2003 Hyundai Sonata with 4 cyl. PO301 error code. Have replaced spark plugs, wires, coil packs, and mass air flow sensor. Replaced air filter due to heavy gas smell. Car was starting after tapping gas 3...


P0301 - Cylinder 1 Misfire Detected.

Possible Causes:
- Improper spark plug at cylinder #1
- Insufficient compression at cylinder #1
- Incorrect fuel pressure
- The injector circuit is open or shorted at cylinder #1
- Fuel injector #1 may be faulty
- Intake air leak at cylinder

Possible Solutions:
- Perform Injector Service
- Replaced Spark Plug #1
- Replaced Injector #1
- Replaced Ignition Coil #1

Being you have a heavy gas smell I would look into the injectors. If injector #1 is over producing it can cause a misfire. Test your compression and fuel pressure.

Jan 17, 2011 | Hyundai Sonata Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How are you... I have just bought a 2006 Dodge Magnum (2.7 liter V-6). I have a check engine light on and I am receiving 2 Codes with my Auto Scanner Plus. 1). P0300: Random/Multiple Cylinder Misfire...


that is the coil on top of #5 spark plug. you can replace the coil or switch it to another cylinder and see if you get a different code. misfire codes are 301-306.

Dec 18, 2010 | 2006 Dodge Magnum

2 Answers

Enging code came up on my 2004 dodge ram 1500 5.7 Hemi. Said ignition coil E was bad and that I had a misfire in cylinder 3. Replaced coil at cylinder 3 but it's still running rough. Is coil E somewhere...


Have you checked the spark plug itself? --- 5.7L Engine To Remove:
NOTE: Note spark plug cable original positions before removing.
dod_ram15_57_ign_coil.gif

dod_ram15_57_ign_coil_loc.gif

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions at the beginning of this section.
  2. Clean the area around the coil with compressed air.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Battery negative cable
    • Throttle body air intake tube and intake box (if necessary)
    • Coil electrical connector by moving slide lock and pressing on release lock
    • Secondary high-voltage cable from coil
    • Mounting bolts
    • Coil from cylinder head opening by twisting
To Install:
  1. Clean area around spark plugs with compressed air.
  2. Apply dielectric grease to inside of boots.
  3. Install or connect the following:
    • Ignition coil to cylinder head opening
    • 2 mounting bolts
      1. Torque to: 106 inch lbs. (12 Nm)
    • Coil electrical connector
    • Cable to coil
    • Throttle body air tube and intake box (if necessary)
    • Battery negative cable
---
Distributorless Ignition System General Information This vehicle uses two different types of ignition systems. The 3.7L, 4.7L, and 5.7L engines do not use a conventional distributor. The 5.9L engine uses a conventional distributor. The ignition system is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) on all engines. Procedures in this section are for the 3.7L, 4.7L, and 5.7L engines; please see the section on Distributor Ignition Systems for procedures for the 5.9L engine.
Distributorless ignition systems (EI) are used on many current engines. This system uses the waste spark method for distributing secondary voltage. In a waste spark system, an individual coil is used to fire one pair of engine cylinders simultaneously. These cylinders are known as companions, since each of their pistons is at TDC at the same time. On a typical V6 engine for example, cylinder 1 is at TDC compression while cylinder 4 is at TDC exhaust. This is also true of cylinders 2 and 5 as well as cylinder 3 and 6.
The cylinder on the compression stroke is known as the event cylinder, while the cylinder on the exhaust stroke is called the waste cylinder. Since secondary resistance is very low in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke, little voltage is required to fire the plug. For this reason, the majority of available voltage is consumed by the cylinder on the compression stroke.
One spark plug is attached to each end of the secondary coil winding via the spark plug wires. This series circuit arrangement causes one of the plugs to fire in a forward direction (center electrode to outer electrode), and the other spark plug to fire in a reverse direction (outer electrode to center electrode). The firing voltage requirements on the waste spark ignition are significantly greater than a traditional ignition system primarily because it takes 30% more energy to fire a plug reverse polarity. When a spark plug is fired backwards, it fires from the outer electrode to the center electrode. This is a high resistance path since the electrons do not flow as easily from a cold, dull surface such as the outer electrode to a hot, sharp surface like the center electrode.
Since the coil and plugs are arranged in a series circuit, a typical plug gap of .050" results in a total gap of .100" for the whole circuit that includes two spark plugs for the companion cylinders. The waste spark can overcome this added resistance by producing high secondary output voltages due to low resistance in the primary winding. Another reason higher secondary ignition voltage is required is cylinder pressure; specifically, the lack of it. Generally, event cylinders require 10 to 12-kV to initiate current flow across the spark plug gap, while only 2 - 3-kV is needed to fire the waste cylinder. Therefore, the air gap in the waste cylinder creates no more resistance than the rotor gap does in a conventional ignition system.
There are two different methods used for coil trigger. One method sends the crankshaft sensor signal directly to the ignition module to activate the coils, while the other sends the crankshaft sensor signal to the PCM and the PCM controls ignition operation either directly or through a separate ignition module.
Waste spark ignition advantages
  • It has fewer components than conventional distributor-type ignition systems.
  • No mechanical adjustments to set ignition timing.
  • No mechanical load (turning the distributor shaft).
  • No unwanted timing variations caused by gear lash or other worn distributor components.
Another advantage of waste spark is longer coil life. To illustrate this point, consider a six-cylinder engine with conventional ignition. At 3000 RPM, the coil must fire 9000 times per minute. This is calculated by dividing the engine speed by 2, since the cam turns at half crank speed, and then multiplying the distributor RPM by the total number of engine cylinders.
In contrast, the coils on a six-cylinder engine with waste spark only work a third as hard. This is because there's a coil for every two cylinders and each coil fires every crankshaft revolution. This means that at 3000 RPM, the coils only fire 3000 times per minute. This allows each coil to operate with less dwell (time that the coil is energized), resulting in less heat buildup and longer life.
Coil Over Plug System The coil over plug system was developed so that spark and spark timing could be better controlled on an individual cylinder basis. Each cylinder has an ignition coil mounted directly above the spark plug on the cylinder head cover. A short suppresser/connector replaces the spark plug wire and links the coil to the plug. There are different methods used for primary triggering. Some manufacturers use a combination coil/module, which means each coil has its own control circuit that is activated by the PCM. Others use remote mounted modules to trigger the coils.
Each individual coil is allowed to saturate while all other cylinders fire. For a V-8 engine, this allows a period of seven firing events for coil saturation, compared to three events for the same V-8 engine with a waste spark system. The coil over plug system also benefits from a minimum amount of energy lost, due to the resistance of spark plug wires.
Coil Near Plug System The coil near plug system also features multiple ignition coils. An ignition coil/module is mounted in proximity of each cylinder. There is a short length of spark plug wire between the coil and the spark plug.
Each ignition coil/module has its own control circuit and is activated sequentially by the PCM. All timing decisions are made by the PCM. This includes both ignition timing and duration of the spark.

Nov 03, 2010 | 2004 Dodge Ram 1500

1 Answer

I got several error codes on my 07 Toyota Avalon, codes P0352,P0300 and P0301-P0306. Does any one one know what could be causing it or how to repair it.


p0352
Ignition coil B primary or secondary circuit malfunction
p0300
Random/multiple cylinder misfire detected
p03001
cylinder no.1 misfire detected
p0306
cylinder no.6 misfire detected
check you coils and spark plugs
make sure they are in good shape. check you spark plug wires also.

Aug 26, 2010 | 2007 Toyota Avalon

1 Answer

1998 Cavalier No Spark in cylinders 1 & 4


ignition mod. grounds,pcm or timing belt could all be it but, I would have to look at timing first.

Jan 13, 2009 | 1998 Chevrolet Cavalier

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