Question about 1999 Dodge Durango

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1999 dodge durango no bus mil. replaced pcm twice and crank position sensor

I have tested ckp,cps,tps,and map. All have only .5 volts and not the requierd 5 volts. Also I have tested the supply voltage @ PCM and it is only .5 volts. What am I missing?

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  • 369 Answers

Make sure ground is good and there is no corrosion at the battery posts or post clamps.

Posted on Oct 02, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: What does PCM stand for?

PCM stands for Powertrain Control Modual. The "no bus" is a communication error between for insterment cluster & the PCM.

Posted on Aug 08, 2009

  • 691 Answers

SOURCE: 1999 dodge caravan new pcm new crank and cam

If you have replace new cam sensor with no sparks and the coil are good putting out 12 volt, my guess would be the computer it self faulty. cam sensor sense the cam turning and send info to computer telling computer to disperse the charge from the coil pack to the plugs assuming relay, cam sensor, coil, plugs, and wires are good. make sure the cam sensor is put in properly and position.

Posted on Aug 28, 2009

wracefans24
  • 1985 Answers

SOURCE: 99 dodge durango pcm and connectors heat up causing the vehicle..

it would be best if you took it to a dealer and left a mechanic take it home over night,that way he can have the Chrysler drb hooked up when the problem presents its self.

Posted on Jan 21, 2010

richard3707
  • 70 Answers

SOURCE: my van 1999 dodge is showing p1389 trouble code (no ASD relay

Replace the ASD relay,but first check the relays powers.One power feed battery and the other one is key on.

Posted on Apr 18, 2010

pctech1
  • 1940 Answers

SOURCE: Where is the asd relay on a 2001 Dodge Durango

The PCM has 3 connectors plugged into it. Try wiggling each connector and listen for a clicking sound, starting with the connector furthest from the front of the durango, and the middle connector with a white top.
If this doesn't help, replace your PCM.

Posted on Jun 18, 2010

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My 1995 dodge caravan trys to start but wont im getting no spark to my spark plugs


Hi mate start at the easiest point which will be to check your EARTH to make sure everything is earthed.

Feb 06, 2015 | Dodge Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1996 jeep cherokeecranks no spark on coil or distributer


Test procedure:


1. Test powers and grounds at the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) on the C1 connector. Pins 2 and 22 are power, then check pins 31 and 32 for ground.

2. Next, test the 5 volt power supplies at pin 17 of the C1 connector and pin 31 of the C2 or middle connector for shorts to ground. Sensors on the circuit are the Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor, Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor, Throttle Position Sensor (TPS), Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor and Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS).

3. Unplug the sensors on the 5 volt power supply, one at a time, while monitoring the 5 volt supply.

4. When the shorted sensor is unplugged, the PCM will wake up and scan tool communication will return.

5. The wiring harness could also be shorted to ground on one of the 5 volt power supply wires. Cut the wires at the PCM on pins C1-17 and just unplug the center connector. Then check for the 5 volts on the PCM of the connector or checking for any continuity to ground with the sensors unplugged at the PCM connector on C1-17 and C2-31 to check the wiring harness

Nov 16, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

It show code po385


P0385 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0385 will set.

Symptoms:

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:

Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

Causes: A P0385 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
* Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
* If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank Sensor Bnd connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the Sensor Bnd measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
* If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
* If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank Sensor Bnd re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0335. This code P0385 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "B", whereas P0335 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "A". If you have the code P0385, your vehicle is equipped with two crank sensors (CPS). Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps (remember to rate this answer).

Jun 07, 2011 | 2001 Oldsmobile Intrigue

1 Answer

P0121 and p0068 on a 2003 dodge ram 1500 replace the throttle position sensor and the idle air sensor at the same time then ran for a week with no problems then the truck started idling up at random then...


P0121 The Throttle position sensor is a potentiometer that measures the amount of throttle opening. As the throttle is opened, the reading (measured in volts) goes up. The powertrain control module (PCM) supplies a 5 Volt reference signal to the throttle position sensor (TPS) and usually a ground also. A general measurement is: at idle = .5 Volts; full throttle = 4.5 Volts. If the PCM detects that the throttle angle is greater or less than it should be for a specific RPM, it will set this code.
Potential Symptoms Symptoms of a P0121 trouble code could include:
  • Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) illumination (Check Engine Light or Service Engine Soon light)
  • Intermittent stumble on acceleration or deceleration
  • Blows black smoke on acceleration
  • No start
Causes A code P0121 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
  • TPS has intermittent open or short internally
  • Harness is rubbing and causing an open or short in the wiring
  • Bad connection at the TPS
  • Bad PCM (less likely)
  • Water or corrosion in connector or sensor
Possible Solutions 1. If you have access to a scan tool, see what the idle and WOT (wide open throttle) readings are for the TPS. Check if they're close to the specifications mentioned above. If not, then replace the TPS and re-check.

2. Check for an intermittent open or short in the TPS signal. To do that, you can't use a scan tool. You'll need an oscilloscope. The reason is because scan tools take samplings of many different readings over just one or two data lines and can miss an intermittent drop out. Hook up your oscilloscope and watch the signal. It should sweep up and down smoothly with no drop outs or spikes.

3. If no problems were noticed, perform a wiggle test. Do this by wiggling the connector and harness while watching the pattern. Does it drop out? If so, replace TPS and re-check.

4. If you have no TPS signal, check for 5 Volt reference at the connector. If it's present, check the ground circuit for open or shorts.

5. Make sure the signal circuit isn't 12V. It should never have battery voltage. If it does, trace circuit for short to voltage and repair.

6. Look for any water in the connector and replace TPS as necessary.
P0068 Symptoms - Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)
- Lack/Loss of power
- Engine rough idle Possible causes - Large vacuum leak
- Leaking air duct system
- Mass Air Flow (MAF) poor electrcial connection
- Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) poor electrcial connection
- Faulty Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor
- Faulty Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor
- TP sensor not seated properly.
- Faulty Throttle Position (TP) sensor.
- Dirty throttle body
When is the code detected? The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) monitors operation rationality check by comparing sensed throttle position to mass air flow readings
P0068 DODGE Description The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) monitors a vehicle operation rationality check by comparing Throttle Position (TP) to Mass Air Flow (MAF) readings. If, during a self-test, the comparison of the TP sensor and MAF sensor readings are not consistent with the calibrated load values, the test fails and a diagnostic trouble code is stored in continuous memory.

Jun 05, 2011 | Dodge Ram 1500 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 1999 Dodge Durango 5.9 Engine and lately it shuts down while I am still driving. I have read several blogs online by other people who own these vehicles and have had the same problem (engine...


Have you check for DTC'S - diagnostic trouble codes ?
Hi. There is a good chance the pcm is causing this , if especially if the vehicle won't start. There are a few other things that will do it too, a sensor or wiring problem can take the pcm down. We can run through a few things if you have a voltmeter to make sure its the pcm if you want. Checking PCM reference voltage at a sensor that's easy to get to , like the TPS . - throttle position sensor . It's a three wire sensor , one wire is a signal to the pcm , ones is a ground supplied from the PCM an the last is a voltage supplie from the pcm , called a reference voltage . could be 5 , 7 or 12 volts it's a steady voltage not like charging voltage .
How to check the 5v reference circuit for short to ground Cadillac Testing ECM Input Sensors with Volt Ohm Meter

Mar 11, 2017 | 1999 Dodge Durango

1 Answer

What does code 385 mean


P0385 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction

What does that mean?
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0385 will set.

Symptoms
NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
* Vehicle may not start (see above)
* Vehicle may run rough or misfire
* MIL illumination

Causes
A P0385 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
* Damaged CKP sensor connector
* Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
* Sensor output open
* Sensor output shorted to ground
* Sensor output shorted to voltage
* Failed crank sensor
* Failed PCM

Possible Solutions
1. Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
2. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank Sensor Bnd connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the Sensor Bnd measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
3. If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
4. If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank Sensor Bnd re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0335. This code P0385 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "B", whereas P0335 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "A". If you have the code P0385, your vehicle is equipped with two crank sensors (CPS). Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope helps (remember rated this).

Jun 14, 2010 | 1995 Ford Taurus

3 Answers

999 Dodge Durango stalling and getting the NO BUS in the odometer. WHen it does happen all gauges are still active, EXCEPT speedometer drops to zero even though I am rolling at 20 mph. I have held off on...


had a chance to look into this. check the power and grounds at the pcm connector c1 2and 22 are power 31 and 32 are ground. check the 5 volt power to some of the sensors, map, tps,crank, cam need to see if there is power same connector c1 #17 and connector c2 #31. if there isn't 5 volts at one of the two wires then you need to disconnect some of the sensors one at a time untill you see 5volts again. if it come back then that sensor is bad. or there is a problem with the wiring. if all wiring and the voltage is there to start off with then yes the pcm is bad. let me know how it goes.

Aug 12, 2009 | 1999 Dodge Durango

2 Answers

Dodge durango PO320 + PO700 + PO725


SYMPTOM
P0320 - NO CRANK REFERENCE SIGNAL AT PCM

WHEN MONITORED
With the ignition ON.

SET CONDITION
No signal from the Crankshaft Position Sensor is present during engine cranking, and at least 3 Camshaft Position Sensor signals have occurred.

POSSIBLE CAUSES
SYMPTOM
P0700 - EATX CONTROLLER DTC PRESENT

WHEN MONITORED
Ignition key ON, Continuously.

SET CONDITION
Any DTC sets in the Transmission Control Module.

POSSIBLE CAUSES

Jun 04, 2009 | 1997 Dodge Caravan

2 Answers

Need to know "no bus" indicator light on instrument panel....


"No Bus" means the data cable going to the (PCM) computer is unplugged, or the PCM has failed and not able to read the information it is being given.
Sometimes just jiggling the PCM causes the ODO "NO BUS" to come on.
Sometimes a bad crank or cam sensor can cause this as well.

Here is the OFFICIAL checklist for the "NO BUS" condition....

Vehicle: 1998 - 1999 Dodge Durango 3.9L
2000 - 2001 Dodge Durango 4.7L
1998 - 2000 Dodge Durango 5.2L
1998 - 2001 Dodge Durango 5.9L



Symptom: Engine will not start. Gauges are inoperative. No BUS message displayed on odometer.



System: Body/Chassis Electrical, Emissions/PCM/Fuel, Engine Electrical



Codes: N/A



Problem 1 of 6: The 5v power supply from the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) is shorted due to a shorted Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor.



Test & Fix: If the 5v power supply circuit is shorted to ground, the CCD bus is unable to transmit messages and the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) appears to be "dead". The PCM is not damaged when the 5v power supply gets shorted to ground, but does need to be reset by turning the key off for 10 second after the short is removed. Using a DVOM or labscope, measure the voltage on the 5v reference wire at the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) or Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor. If 5v is not present, unplug the Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor. Turn the key off for 10 seconds. Turn the key on and measure the voltage on the 5v power supply circuit. If the voltage is now 5v, replace the CKP sensor.



Problem 2 of 6: The 5v power supply from the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) is shorted due to a shorted Camshaft Position (CMP) Sensor.



Test & Fix: If the 5v power supply circuit is shorted to ground, the CCD bus is unable to transmit messages and the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) appears to be "dead". The PCM is not damaged when the 5v power supply gets shorted to ground, but does need to be reset by turning the key off for 10 second after the short is removed. Using a DVOM or labscope, measure the voltage on the 5v reference wire at the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) or Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Sensor. If 5v is not present, unplug the Camshaft Position (CMP) Sensor. Turn the key off for 10 seconds. Turn the key on and measure the voltage on the 5v power supply circuit. If the voltage is now 5v, replace the CMP sensor.



Problem 3 of 6: The 5v power supply from the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) is shorted due to a shorted Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Sensor.



Test & Fix: If the 5v power supply circuit is shorted to ground, the CCD bus is unable to transmit messages and the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) appears to be "dead". The PCM is not damaged when the 5v power supply gets shorted to ground, but does need to be reset by turning the key off for 10 second after the short is removed. Using a DVOM or labscope, measure the voltage on the 5v reference wire (5v power supply) at the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) or Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Sensor. If 5v is not present, unplug the MAP sensor. Turn the key off for 10 seconds. Turn the key on and measure the voltage on the 5v power supply circuit. If the voltage is now 5v, replace the MAP sensor.



Problem 4 of 6: The 5v power supply from the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) is shorted due to a shorted Throttle Position Sensor (TPS).



Test & Fix: If the 5v power supply circuit is shorted to ground, the CCD bus is unable to transmit messages and the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) appears to be "dead". The PCM is not damaged when the 5v power supply gets shorted to ground, but does need to be reset by turning the key off for 10 second after the short is removed. Using a DVOM or labscope, measure the voltage on the 5v reference wire (5 volt power supply) at the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) or Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Sensor. If 5v is not present, unplug the TPS. Turn the key off for 10 seconds. Turn the key on and measure the voltage on the 5v power supply circuit. If the voltage is now 5v, replace the TPS.



Problem 5 of 6: The 5v power supply from the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) is shorted due to a shorted wire.



Test & Fix: If the 5v power supply circuit is shorted to ground, the CCD bus is unable to transmit messages and the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) appears to be "dead". The PCM is not damaged when the 5v power supply gets shorted to ground, but does need to be reset by turning the key off for 10 second after the short is removed. Using a DVOM or labscope, measure the voltage on the 5v reference wire at the throttle position sensor (TPS) or manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor. If 5v is not present, unplug all sensors that are connected to the 5v power supply and disconnect the PCM. Check if either 5v power supply circuit is shorted to ground using a DVOM. If the circuit is found to be shorted to ground, repair the wire and the cause of the short.



Problem 6 of 6: The 5v power supply from the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) is shorted due to a shorted Governor Pressure Sensor.



Test & Fix: If the 5v power supply circuit is shorted to ground, the CCD bus is unable to transmit messages and the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) appears to be "dead". The PCM is not damaged when the 5v power supply gets shorted to ground, but does need to be reset by turning the key off for 10 second after the short is removed. Using a DVOM or labscope, measure the voltage on the 5v reference wire at the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) or Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Sensor. If 5v is not present, unplug the large round connector on the driver's side of the transmission. Turn the key off for 10 seconds. Turn the key on and measure the voltage on the 5v power supply circuit. If the voltage is now 5v, remove the transmission pan and check for shorted wiring inside the transmission. If the wiring is OK, replace the Governor Pressure Sensor.


Many times the PCM simply overheats - and changing it will stop the problem.


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May 13, 2009 | 1999 Dodge Durango

2 Answers

2000 Ram 1500 4x4 "no bus"


All the modules are connected together to communicate with each other via the PCI bus. It is possible that one of the modules is pulling the bus down. If the vehicle won't start it could be any one of the modules. It will be a process of elimination to find the faulty one by disconnecting them one at a time.

Apr 22, 2009 | 1998 Dodge Ram 1500 4WD

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