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83 280 zx dies when warm

83 280 zx. Did complete tune up. Ghanged distributor, ignition module, coil, battery, ignition switch. I havent cleaned or changed ECU or any of the fuel related relays. I have the same problem as many. The car dies when it reaches normal opperating temp. Sometimes it will start without letting it cool. At times it wont restart unless I spray starting fluid into intake.However once restarted it will run 5, 10 min and shut off. Almost as if ive tirned the key off. Whats wrong? Please help me if you can. Thanks

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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I think you have a failing fuel pump. This is exactly what they do when they are about done working.

Posted on May 18, 2017

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 13 Answers

SOURCE: 1990 buick century limited

Have you tried replacing the pick-up coil?

Posted on Nov 03, 2008

  • 4 Answers

SOURCE: Truck runs fine till reaches running temp then dies, no spark

Sounds like a bad ignition coil. Have it tested.

Posted on Dec 14, 2008

  • 432 Answers

SOURCE: 94 Bravada that stumbles and stalls.. won't start when warm..

Try checking the exhaust flow when someone else is pushing down on the gas petal.The farther the petal gos down,the more exhaust should be coming out. I replaced my catalitic convertor at 44000 miles, it was clogged. I had them install a high flow type.

Posted on Sep 03, 2009

  • 80 Answers

SOURCE: 83 280 zx dyes when warm. Complete tune up. Then new distributor and ignition module. Change ignition switch with many of the used ones ive got from wrecking yard. I havent cleaned terminals on ECU or

Hello! I've been there too. I guess you have touched your coil after the engine stops. If the coil is hot, usually the cause is a very high resistance in the high tension circuit. That is between the coil and spark plugs. Probably something makes a false contact or loose conection or the gap at the plugs it too big.
If your coil is cold, perhaps your coolant temperature sensor is bad. This sensor tells the ecu or the cold start valve to squirt more fuel. When it fails your engine can't start when cold or it dies when hot depending on the failure type. Another thing which can go wrong if your coil is cold can be the cold start valve. This is an auxiliar injector located at the throttle body. When it fails, it simply doesn't inject fuel or injects all the time! (Only 80's cars have cold start valve)

Posted on Nov 20, 2013

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1 Answer

280zx shuts off when warm.


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Nov 20, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

83 280 zx dyes when warm. Complete tune up. Then new distributor and ignition module. Change ignition switch with many of the used ones ive got from wrecking yard. I havent cleaned terminals on ECU or


Hello! I've been there too. I guess you have touched your coil after the engine stops. If the coil is hot, usually the cause is a very high resistance in the high tension circuit. That is between the coil and spark plugs. Probably something makes a false contact or loose conection or the gap at the plugs it too big.
If your coil is cold, perhaps your coolant temperature sensor is bad. This sensor tells the ecu or the cold start valve to squirt more fuel. When it fails your engine can't start when cold or it dies when hot depending on the failure type. Another thing which can go wrong if your coil is cold can be the cold start valve. This is an auxiliar injector located at the throttle body. When it fails, it simply doesn't inject fuel or injects all the time! (Only 80's cars have cold start valve)

Nov 19, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 1985 2.5 s-10 wont spray gas through the throttlebody but pumps from the fuel pump what would make it do this i can straight wire it to the battery and it will spray someone told me it could be the...


Using a test light, and with the ignition key in the "On" or "Run" position check for full battery voltage at the (+) positive side of the ignition coil, and then check for full battery voltage at the wire connector to the distributor for the wire that runs between the (+) positive side of the ignition coil and the distributor. (dis-connect the wire connector from the distributor to test) If full battery voltage is present at the (+) positive side of the ignition coil but not through the ignition coil to the distributor then replace the ignition coil. If full battery voltage is present at both the ignition coil and the distributor then remove the ignition module from the distributor to have it tested and most auto part stores will test it for you for free. The ignition module is what generates the signal that the ECM uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, and be certain that the ignition module is installed into the distributor using a silicone grease or some other die-electric compound to completely cover the metal mounting surface of the ignition module because it is a heat-sink, and be careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it can be damaged. There is also a hall-effect switch inside of that distributor that would be the next suspect if the ignition module tests out alright, and if there is no spark there is a pick-up coil/stator assembly that could be faulty and if that is the case then replace the entire distributor because the distributor will have to be removed and dis-assembled to replace the pick-up coil/stator assembly.


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Nov 30, 2010 | 1985 Chevrolet S-10 Blazer

1 Answer

Getting spark and fuel and did a tune up and put new injectors in there but the car cranks but wont start and it is 1988 corvette


The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.

Sep 25, 2010 | 1988 Chevrolet Corvette

1 Answer

89 k1500 towed, now fuel injectors dont fire. read all wired to and from ecm, check good. ecm will start another truck.


Check the ECM fuse and then check for any loose wire connectors, especially at the fire-wall area, the ignition coil, and the distributor. Then check for battery voltage at the positive side of the ignition coil when the ignition key is in the "On" or "Run" position, and there should also be battery voltage running over from a wire that is also connected to the positive side of the ignition coil, and then that wire will run over from the ignition coil to the ignition module inside of the distributor, and if there is battery voltage there at the ignition module, then either the ignition module or the pick-up coil inside of the distributor will be the most likely suspects for the cause of the problem.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is actually what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like it could also be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.


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Sep 18, 2010 | 1989 Chevrolet K1500

2 Answers

No spark from spark plug wires I think it may be the distributor cap or interior parts under cap like rotor and condensor but dont want to change parts thats are fine i replaced the plugs but still no...


There wrere two types of HEI (High Energy Ignition) distributors used by GM in 1985, one was the original design with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap, and the second had the coil mounted seperate from the distributor and used a coil wire.

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also if the coil is seperate from the distributor that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require any further assistance.


GM HEI Ignition Coil (Mounted In Distributor Cap Type)
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Jul 30, 2010 | 1985 Chevrolet Chevy

1 Answer

1991 Caprice Classic.Fuel pump works but does not activate when the car is started with the key. Also no spark. Any ideas?


The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one or all of these systems to malfunction.

There is also the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor and ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition coil to the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.


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Jul 15, 2010 | Chevrolet Caprice Classic Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Cranks over but wont start. Problem happens mostly when it has rained, but lately on a dry morning as well. has had a full tune up and that worked for a few weeks, but now it's back. I know it's gotta be...


That sounds like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Jun 13, 2010 | 1998 GMC Sierra

2 Answers

94 blazer, replaced ignition modual. when engine


Most likely the cause of the ignition module burning out is because of the ignition coil, and you should try replacing the ignition coil and the ignition module both together, and be sure to clean out the distributor mounting suface, and be very certain that you do completely cover the metal mounting surface of the ignition module with the silicone grease or die-electric compound. Also be sure that you do not ov er-tighten the ignition module because you could damage it and cause a lot of similar problems.

Jun 04, 2010 | 1994 Chevrolet S-10 Blazer

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