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A6 2.4 V6 1999 oil cooler is leaking can it be repaired.

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Yes,must track the problem,if the cooler or the lines.The cooler radiator must take off and get to workshop for soldering or bypass cells.

Posted on Oct 22, 2013

  • Mogomotsi Mocha Oct 23, 2013

    Very informative I wished I had known about the website I would have avoided driving allover Jo'burg. Keep going please. Thanks

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SOURCE: replace oil cooler line leaking

CHECK TO MAKE SURE LINE IS TIGHT IF SO REPLACE THE OIL COOLER LINE ITS LEAKING.

Posted on May 02, 2010

jlisagearhea
  • 412 Answers

SOURCE: oil leak from the oil cooler sensor

normally you have an oring between sensor and hose....if not....teflon works great....unless sensor itself has cracked or been damaged and failed...give it a try...

Posted on Nov 13, 2009

  • 118 Answers

SOURCE: oil in water. have had cooler tested at radiator

its either a blown head gasket or a cracked head

Posted on Sep 03, 2010

SOURCE: coolant leak behind the oil cooler. How do I

Transmission & or Power Steering Cooler,
in front of radiator ?

Obviously remove the radiator to get to it

Posted on Sep 12, 2013

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1 Answer

Oil cooler leak


I do not really see the problem here. If you found the leak then it is pretty easy to fix. I do not know if the oil cooler seal is available separately. Most of the time the Mazda dealer only sells the seal with the oil cooler and that is pretty expensive.

Jan 12, 2014 | 2006 Mazda 5

Tip

How to check you Volkswagen & Audi oil cooler for leaks.


If you own a Volkswagen or Audi and have coolant in your engine oil or oil in your coolant you may have a failing oil cooler. This may have been misdiagnosed as a bad head gasket.

Before spending hundreds or thousands repairing a head gasket that may not be the problem you can perform this relatively easy check of your oil cooler which is a common problem on many Volks/Audi models that use oil filter type of oil cooler. This type of cooler is located between the oil filter and the engine block. The oil filter screws onto the oil cooler. It has two rubber coolant hoses attached to it and is made from aluminum.

The oil cooler works by passing engine oil through the body of the cooler. The engine oil passes over what resembles a radiator inside the cooler. This 'mini radiator' is passing engine coolant in through one of the hoses and out through the other. When working properly the oil and coolant is kept separated. Over time the passages inside the cooler can corrode and the oil and engine coolant inside can mix. This can lead to coolant in your engine oil (which may produce a milky substance on the inside of the oil filler cap) or oil in the coolant (which you may be able to see in the coolant reservoir as a dark ring or oily film).

To test your cooler for leaks you will need a few basic tools and about 3 hour of your time. (To allow for the engine to cool)

-Basic ratchet set and set of screwdrivers.

-One straight 5/8 inch plastic heater hose connector. You can find thisat most auto parts or plumbing supply stores. Cost about $1.

-A pan to catch some coolant that will spill.

This procedure is best done on a lift but can be done using jack stands as well. This MUST be done with a cool engine to avoid burns from coolant.

-Lift or jack the front end of the car. (If you don't know how to safely jack a car onto jack stands, DO NOT proceed any further. Take the car to your repair shop and have them follow these instructions)

-Remove the plastic cover under the front of the car (if your model has this) to expose the oil filter. The oil filter is a cylindrical part that sticks out from the side of the engine.

-The oil filter is screwed into the oil cooler. You will see two rubber hoses connected to the oil cooler.

-Using a flat screwdriver or socket loosen the clamps connecting the hoses to the cooler. Now have the plastic connector handy. Remove the hoses from the cooler, you may need to pry on them with a screw driver.I find that twisting them to break their seal works well. Catch any coolant that spills in the pan.

-Take each rubber hose and push them onto the plastic connector being sure to keep the clamps on the hoses. Tighten the clamps. (Not too tight, just snug) Now you have just eliminated the cooler from the system temporarily.The rubber hoses are now connected to each other.

-Wipe the oil cooler clean with a rag so it is easier to see any leaks that might develop.

-Now start the engine and let it run to normal operating temperature.This means at least 15 minutes but to be sure you find any leaks I suggest half an hour.

-Keep a close eye on the 2 metal tubes on the oil cooler. (The ones you removed the rubber hoses from) You are looking for engine oil to begin seeping out. It will appear golden brown to black in color.

If you see oil coming from those tubes you have found your problem. You will need to buy and install a new oil cooler.

If you don't see any oil leaking you will need to look elsewhere for the trouble. Possibly a head gasket, unfortunately.

-Let the engine cool for a few hours before reattaching the oil cooler. It is the reverse of removal.

-Replace any lost coolant with the same amount you caught in the pan.

And there you have it. A pretty simple procedure that may save you a bunch of cash in repairs.



on Jan 31, 2010 | Volkswagen Golf Cars & Trucks

Tip

How to check your Volkswagen & Audi oil cooler for leaks.


If you own a Volkswagen or Audi and have coolant in your engine oil or oil in your coolant you may have a failing oil cooler. This may have been misdiagnosed as a bad head gasket.

Before spending hundreds or thousands repairing a head gasket that may not be the problem you can perform this relatively easy check of your oil cooler which is a common problem on many Volks/Audi models that use oil filter type of oil cooler. This type of cooler is located between the oil filter and the engine block. The oil filter screws onto the oil cooler. It has two rubber coolant hoses attached to it and is made from aluminum.

The oil cooler works by passing engine oil through the body of the cooler. The engine oil passes over what resembles a radiator inside the cooler. This 'mini radiator' is passing engine coolant in through one of the hoses and out through the other. When working properly the oil and coolant is kept separated. Over time the passages inside the cooler can corrode and the oil and engine coolant inside can mix. This can lead to coolant in your engine oil (which may produce a milky substance on the inside of the oil filler cap) or oil in the coolant (which you may be able to see in the coolant reservoir as a dark ring or oily film).

To test your cooler for leaks you will need a few basic tools and about 3 hour of your time. (To allow for the engine to cool)

-Basic ratchet set and set of screwdrivers.

-One straight 5/8 inch plastic heater hose connector. You can find this at most auto parts or plumbing supply stores. Cost about $1.

-A pan to catch some coolant that will spill.

This procedure is best done on a lift but can be done using jack stands as well. This MUST be done with a cool engine to avoid burns from coolant.

-Lift or jack the front end of the car. (If you don't know how to safely jack a car onto jack stands, DO NOT proceed any further. Take the car to your repair shop and have them follow these instructions)

-Remove the plastic cover under the front of the car (if your model has this) to expose the oil filter. The oil filter is a cylindrical part that sticks out from the side of the engine.

-The oil filter is screwed into the oil cooler. You will see two rubber hoses connected to the oil cooler.

-Using a flat screwdriver or socket loosen the clamps connecting the hoses to the cooler. Now have the plastic connector handy. Remove the hoses from the cooler, you may need to pry on them with a screw driver. I find that twisting them to break their seal works well. Catch any coolant that spills in the pan.

-Take each rubber hose and push them onto the plastic connector being sure to keep the clamps on the hoses. Tighten the clamps. (Not too tight, just snug) Now you have just eliminated the cooler from the system temporarily. The rubber hoses are now connected to each other.

-Wipe the oil cooler clean with a rag so it is easier to see any leaks that might develop.

-Now start the engine and let it run to normal operating temperature. This means at least 15 minutes but to be sure you find any leaks I suggest half an hour.

-Keep a close eye on the 2 metal tubes on the oil cooler. (The ones you removed the rubber hoses from) You are looking for engine oil to begin seeping out. It will appear golden brown to black in color.

If you see oil coming from those tubes you have found your problem. You will need to buy and install a new oil cooler.

If you don't see any oil leaking you will need to look elsewhere for the trouble. Possibly a head gasket, unfortunately.

-Let the engine cool for a few hours before reattaching the oil cooler. It is the reverse of removal.

-Replace any lost coolant with the same amount you caught in the pan.

And there you have it. A pretty simple procedure that may save you a bunch of cash in repairs.




on Jan 31, 2010 | Audi A4 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine oil cooler's leaking problem


Why not actually go to the dealer & into the service bay
& see the problem for yourself

If that is not allowed leave & try a local more friendly
repair shop

A cooler can fail yes

Aug 28, 2013 | Nissan Rogue Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

97 vw golf 1.8 there is a squar box where oil filter fastens to. oil is leaking from top of this box. what is this box and how i fix the leak?


The box is the oil cooler. The oil is most likely leaking from the oil cooler seal. The oil cooler is the square aluminum piece that the oil filter screws onto. To replace the seal, remove the filter, remove both coolant hoses that attach to the cooler, remove the nut that secures the cooler to the block and slide the cooler off the tube. Replace the rubber o-ring seal which is available at the VW dealer. It's inexpensive. Replace everything in reverse order. Good luck

Jan 05, 2011 | Volkswagen Golf Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

How do i repair oil filter housing leak?


The oil is most likely leaking from the oil cooler seal. The oil cooler is the square aluminum piece that the oil filter screws onto. To replace the seal, remove the filter, remove both coolant hoses that attach to the cooler, remove the nut that secures the cooler to the block and slide the cooler off the tube. Replace the rubber o-ring seal which is available at the VW dealer. It's inexpensive. Replace everything in reverse order. Good luck!

Dec 28, 2010 | 1997 Volkswagen Jetta

1 Answer

Oil lleak on side of oil fiter


Its either the oil filter, the oil cooler, or the rear of the intake manifold. . The oil cooler has a gasket and seals you can replace. Be sure to make sure where the leak is, before attepting to repair.;

Nov 29, 2010 | 1989 Chevrolet G20

1 Answer

Oil in water. have had cooler tested at radiator


its either a blown head gasket or a cracked head

Sep 03, 2010 | 2003 Audi A8

3 Answers

OIL IN MY RADIATOR


Maybe oil cooler line in radiator leaking

Jan 07, 2009 | 1995 Buick Riviera

1 Answer

Oil cooler


You will need to have repaired/replaced. cooling system will need to be flushed and it is best to replace all hoses as the oil will soften the rubber and cause to swell and pop. be sure to have overflow tank flushed out as well. was this the trans cooler? will need to change tranny fluid also.or engine oil which ever.

Oct 08, 2008 | 2003 Oldsmobile Silhouette

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