Question about 2008 Pontiac Solstice

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2008 Pontiac solstice coolant light keeps coming on and noticed coolant leaking is it the radiator or thermostat

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6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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salsaurbana
  • 56 Answers

SOURCE: 1999 Pontiac Grand Am Overheating

It is probably the problem. To make shure that need to change the gaskets, one of the symptoms use to be thet the temp rises when you are running at speed 50+ average, where is supposed that the car gets a lot of air due by the speed and nobody thinks that will be overheated.

Posted on Nov 19, 2008

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  • 4 Answers

SOURCE: overheating an losing coolant

Make sure there is nothing blocking the air flow in front of the radiator, it could be something small covering it to make these cars overheat. Ive had the same problem in the past.

Posted on Nov 28, 2008

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: 1996 Pontiac Grand Am overheating

If its the 3.1L it could be your intake manifold gasket , the material used for the gasket does not react well with GM's Dex-Cool antifreeze. The leak may not be apparent at first, but I would pressure test the cooling system. If you look at the front of the motor by the belts , try to peek down at the intake manifold and check for slight seapage to an obvious leak.

If its either of the Quad-4's they were notorious for heads warping or cracking.

Posted on Feb 03, 2009

SOURCE: Pontiac 2003 grand am low coolant light comes on

check if the engine is over heat,it it over heating ,definitely the coolant will dry,so check is,hope that clear your mind and help you

Posted on Sep 07, 2009

  • 12 Answers

SOURCE: Overheating Fiero

well fieros are very different cars you need to fill collent in a speical way so air doesnt get in the lines most fiero owners do not know this but it very important The best way to tell it is for wikipedia
Cooling system issues
With an already hot normal operating temperature of 220 °F (104 °C) prior to the recall switching to a 195 °F (91 °C) thermostat, the mid-mounted engine utilized long pipes to carry coolant to the front-mounted radiator. This demanded that a special coolant filling procedure be followed to prevent severe overheating. Simply pouring coolant into the thermostat housing (on the engine) would leave an air bubble in the radiator, while adding coolant just to the radiator would leave an air bubble in the engine's coolant passages. Proper procedure (with engine idling and the thermostat removed, filling the thermostat housing, burping the bubble out of the radiator by cracking open the radiator cap until coolant exits) must be followed in order to ensure an air-free cooling system.
A second problem has become common as more Fieros are being serviced by shops unfamiliar with their design. The under-body coolant tubes are positioned in such a way that a casual glance beneath the car will not suggest their fragility. As a result, many have been crushed by shop lifts, resulting in a near complete lack of engine cooling. The age of the car means that even GM dealerships may now be unaware of the proper jacking methods.
Lastly, the absence of a spare tire (at the front of the car, right behind the radiator) could have an effect on coolant system performance. i dont know who wrote this and i dont take credit for it

Posted on Nov 19, 2009

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1 Answer

Why is the temperature light keep coming on and the gauge keep going up and down?


Temperature Warning Light is on Inspection Service How this system works: With the exception of older, air-cooled vehicles, cars rely on a liquid called coolant (or antifreeze) to keep the engine at an optimal temperature. Coolant is a mixture of water and ethylene glycol, and it circulates around the engine block and absorbs excess heat, which keeps the engine from overheating. The coolant converts that heat to air in the radiator, and then the air is emitted, at which time the coolant is ready to absorb more heat. Without coolant, the engine would quickly ruin itself with its own heat production. Common reasons for this to happen:
  • Coolant is low or weak: The most common culprit when an engine overheats is low or weak coolant. If your car doesn't have enough coolant, then it can't absorb enough heat. While your car will naturally lose small amounts of coolant over the years, a leak is the most likely cause of low coolant levels.The proper ratio of coolant to water can also get distorted, resulting in a problem. Too little or even too much antifreeze can dramatically lower the boiling point of the coolant. A proper ratio of antifreeze to water is 50/50 to 60/40, depending on the vehicle.
  • Broken radiator fan shroud: The radiator fan shroud directs the airflow across the radiator so the air can absorb the coolant's heat. When the fan shroud breaks or becomes dislodged, air fails to enter the radiator, and the coolant will no longer have a place to direct the transfer of heat.
  • Broken or missing air dam: Along with the shroud, some vehicles have an air dam (or deflector) underneath the vehicle. If this is broken or missing then the air can pass underneath the vehicle but not also through the radiator, which will cause overheating. These air dams are essential in newer vehicles, as they force the air through the fan shroud.
  • Faulty coolant temperature sensor: The temperature sensor takes constant readings of the coolant temperature and sends that information to the engine control unit. Based on the temperature of the coolant, the engine control unit adjusts the ignition timing, the fuel injector pulse, and the operation of the electric cooling fan.
  • Bad water pump: The water pump is responsible for keeping the coolant cycling throughout the engine. After the coolant transfers its heat energy to the air, the water pump recirculates it around the engine so that it can absorb more heat. The most common water pump problems are a leaking pump, bad bearings, or an impeller that has rotted away due to a low coolant ratio.
  • Stuck thermostat: The thermostat acts as a dam for the coolant. When the engine first turns on, and it is still cold, the thermostat keeps the coolant from circulating, which allows the engine to warm up as quickly as possible. Once the engine has reached its operating temperature, the thermostat opens and allows the coolant to circulate. A stuck thermometer may stay permanently sealed and therefore keep the coolant from reaching the engine block.
  • The thermostat may also stick open. This will not usually result in overheating, but it will waste gas.
  • Broken engine cooling fan: The engine has a cooling fan that is deployed when the coolant needs some extra help. When the coolant temperature sensor notices that the coolant temperature is getting too high, the engine control unit (on newer vehicles) will initiate the cooling fan to reduce the temperature.
  • Broken thermostatic fan clutch: Older vehicles use a thermostatic fan clutch to engage the engine cooling fan, which is mounted to the fan blades. The fan clutch uses a bi-metallic spring that tightens when the temperature increases. This acts as a "high speed" option for the fan, and when engaged, it draws more air across the radiator.
  • Blown head gasket: The head gaskets sit between the engine block and the cylinder heads, and keep coolant from entering the engine's oil and combustion chamber. When a gasket blows and coolant seeps in, the issue is not only that the engine will overheat, but also that damage may be done to the catalytic converter and oxygen sensors due to contamination from the coolant. What to expect: A top-rated mobile mechanic will come to your home or office to determine the cause of the temperature warning light turning on and the source of the overheating, and will then provide a detailed inspection report that includes the scope and cost of the necessary repairs. How important is this service? An overheating engine is extremely dangerous. It is not safe to drive a vehicle with an overheating engine, or you may ruin the engine completely and put yourself at risk. As soon as you notice the light come on, pull over. If there is no place to safely pull over, turn off your radio and other electrical units, and turn your heat on high (this will funnel some of the hot engine air into the cabin). As soon as you can safely pull over, do so, and then book one of our mechanics to perform an inspection.

Sep 30, 2016 | 2008 Pontiac G6

1 Answer

Just had a new radiator kit installed on a 2000 ford windstar am noticing that we are burning through alot of coolant since then What could this relate to Ty in advance


Shouldn't "burn through" coolant. If you don't notice any leaks then my guess would be.... after installing a new radiator it is normal to have to keep topping off the fluid because air gets in the system and as the coolant passes through and the thermostat opens it releases air bubbles. Most mechanic shops do "burp" the system after changing coolant but sometimes all the air doesn't come out.

Apr 28, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Thermostat replacement


take the 2 bolts on the thermostat housing out, pull up on the housing, antifreeze will go everywhere, pull the thermostat out, put the new one in, in the same position you pulled the old one out. replace gasket, put the housing back on, put bolts in, fill radiator, start the car warm it up looking for leaks and monitoring coolant level until car is up to temp. you will be able to see current in the coolant with the radiator cap off when the thermostat opens. A couple things to keep in mind. 1 coolant will expand and slowly rise out of the filler neck between open cycles of the thermostat, 2. VERY important keep the cap off the radiator while warming up the car and monitoring coolant levels.

Feb 16, 2012 | 2001 Pontiac Grand Am SE

2 Answers

I have a 98 cavalier and it keeps over heating any pointers


First, look for leaks and make certain your radiator and overflow are full-do you have heat? If not, you may have a closed thermostat. If you have antifreeze in your oil, or notice smoke coming out of your tailpipe when the car is fully warmed up, you may have a blown head gasket.

Dec 23, 2010 | 1998 Chevrolet Cavalier

3 Answers

I have a Pontiac Montana (2000). That on my way to work the low coolant level light came on. and after work when I started it up the light did not come right away but it came on and there was no heat and...


No. It is not the thermostat. You are just low on coolant. The reason for the low coolant is either the fan is not working, the head gasket is blown, or the coolant system has a leak.
The fan is easy to check. When the temp comes up then the fan should come on.
The head gasket is easy to check also. Your oil will be milky white.
And if the radiator, radiator hose, or gasket leak can be harder to find.
The heater not working is because there is not enough water to heat the heater core.
PLEASE RATE. By checking Four thumbs ups!
Thanks! Have a GREAT DAY!

Oct 16, 2010 | 2000 Pontiac Montana

1 Answer

I have a 1995 Pontiac Grand Prix GTP 3.4L DOHC....... The engine is over heating (yes it has coolant in it).... and I had noticed a leak in the coolant so we replaced the radiator (which had a hole in it)...


REPLACE THERMOSTAT TO BE ON THE SAFE SIDE.IF YOU PUT NEW RADIATOR IN MORE LIKELY YOU NEED TO BLEED COOLANT SYSTEM CHECK COOLANT LEVEL WHEN ENGINE COOLS DOWN. YOU HAVE AIR IN COOLANT SYSTEM.AIR WILL EXPEL AND COOLANT LEVEL DROPS ADD MORE COOLANT UNTIL YOU HAVE RIGHT AMOUNT COOLANT IN RADIATOR.DONT DRIVE CAR UNTIL COOLANT SYSTEM BLEED.WHEN THERMOSTAT OPENS TURN OFF ENGINE WAIT A WHILE THEN CHECK COOLANT LEVEL KEEP ADDING UNTIL COOLANT LEVEL STOP DROPPING IN RADIATOR. USE LARGE RAG OVER RADIATOR CAP TO KEEP FROM GETTING SCALDED BUT WAIT UNTIL COOL DOWN ENOUGH SO YOU WONT GET SCALDED.

Sep 01, 2010 | 1995 Pontiac Grand Prix

2 Answers

2.3l ranger keeps overheating, been through two radiators already.


Hello Ranger Joe, eight months and two radiators is very uncommon. Question, Have you visually confirmed the leak in the radiators or is the leak near the hose connections? Replacing the radiator, cap, water pump, & the thermostat leaves only two others, the hoses and the engine block/heads. Far fitched will be something or somebody poking holes in the radiator.

Nov 07, 2008 | 2003 Ford Ranger Regular Cab

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