Question about 1998 Mercedes-Benz C-Class

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Catalyst, EVAP, Oxygen, Secondary Air Systems monitors all failed about same time and won't pass CA smog test.

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

savdragon
  • 37 Answers

SOURCE: failed emmisions test..

I am in Virginia but I believe you vehicle is showing a monitors not ready for Catalyst & Evap. If that is correct you need to basically drive the car a few days. The computer will remonitor itself and should be fine following that. Most drive cycles require highway driving & city driving. Make sure you turn on a/c as well. Its not how many miles you drive but what conditions you drive that sets you monitors. You could locate the drive cycle and attempt to replicate it but its usually very difficult drive exactly as the cycle asks. Good luck.

Posted on Mar 18, 2009

rickyrt441
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SOURCE: 2003 mercedes c class what

Thanks for choosing FixYa and welcome again. I wasn't sure if you already passed your smog test. This is your oxygen sensor. The code is for insufficient flow on your bank 1, 2nd sensor. This means you need to change the back sensor. This was why I was telling you about the old codes staying on. If you haven't changed the sensor, you need to go ahead and change it. This is why you are getting this code. If it was the egr, you would have a different code. Since you already passed thee test, forget about the gas cap. Change the back sensor. Just remember to erase the code with your computer and don't be surprised if it stays on there for a few hundred miles. Best regards, Rick.

Posted on Apr 15, 2011

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Had both air fuel sensors replaced to pass CA smog. OBD2 evap and catalyst monitors say "inc" or "not ready," and vehicle won't pass smog.


Not sure how old the vehicle is, or model, or engine, so I can only give general suggestions. You may need new catyitic converters, or O2 sensors. They sometimes can't be corrected, just replaced.

Feb 15, 2016 | Toyota Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 2002 BMW 745 I with 64000 miles on it. It passes emission smog test but gets 2 engine fail signals indicating a carbon buildup in the exhaust system. I have also had many intermitent erroneous...


I can only assume that your faults are for the secondary air system since they are common. The secondary air system comprises of an air pump, plastic lines, diverter valves, ports inside the heads and monitor by the o2 sensors. I recommend having the air pump tested for proper activation, a smoke test of the lines and diverter valves, and a scan to make sure no oxygen sensor faults are current. Clogged ports in the heads are possible, but I recommend checking the basics first.

Jul 25, 2014 | 2002 BMW 7 Series

1 Answer

What is code P0420, check engine light, 2004 Iszuzu Rodeo


Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold I have put together the following information about the P0420 fault code. I have also included diagnostic procedures you can take to your repair shop if the mechanic is having difficulty analyzing the code.
OBD II Fault Code
  • OBD II P0420
Fault Code Definition
  • Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold
Symptoms
  • Check Engine Light will illuminate
  • In most cases, there are no adverse conditions noticed by the driver
  • In some cases, there may be some performance problems noticed by the driver such as a lack of power from a restricted and/or damaged Catalytic Converter
Common Problems That Trigger the P0420 Code
  • Inefficient Catalytic Converter(s)
  • Defective Front or Rear Oxygen Sensor(s)
  • Misfiring engines
Common Misdiagnoses
  • Oxygen Sensors
Polluting Gases Expelled
  • HCs (Hydrocarbons): Unburned droplets of raw fuel that smell, affect breathing, and contribute to smog
  • CO (Carbon Monoxide): Partially burned fuel that is an odorless and deadly poisonous gas
  • NOX (Oxides of Nitrogen): One of the two ingredients that, when exposed to sunlight, cause smog
  • Most of the aftermarket Converter companies are re-working their designs so they can be certified for use in OBD-II vehicles in California
The Basics
The Catalytic Converter looks like a muffler. It is typically a stainless steel housing over a ceramic honeycomb core. The catalyst itself is made of platinum, palladium, or rhodium, all rare metals, which is why Catalytic Converters are so expensive. These elements reduce the toxicity of harmful exhaust gases that are expelled from the tail pipe. Catalytic converters are quite efficient, but if engine maintenance is neglected or an engine is allowed to "run rough," damage could occur, resulting in costly repairs. To replace the Catalytic Converter, the vehicle is raised to gain access to its underside. The converter is removed from the exhaust system and the new Catalytic Converter is installed.
Want to Learn More?
The Catalytic Converter is a sophisticated after-burning device designed to complete combustion of the exhaust gases that pass through it. It is a stainless steel container with an inlet and outlet pipe that looks similar to a muffler. Inside, the Catalytic Converter is a ceramic monolithic structure that has honeycomb-like passages running though it. This structure has several sections called beds that are thinly coated with rare metals, which react with the compounds in the exhaust gases to complete the combustion process, thereby cleaning the exhaust of harmful emissions.
  • The first section of the Catalytic Converter is called the reduction bed and is coated with rhodium. It is called the reduction bed because its purpose is to reduce the NOx gases back into harmless nitrogen and oxygen.
  • The next section of the Catalytic Converter is the oxygen storage bed, which is coated with cerium. Its purpose is to maintain an ideal level of oxygen for use by the rear of the converter. It does this by storing and releasing the oxygen that gets released from the reduction of NOx in the previous reduction bed.
  • The oxygen is then available for use in the final oxidizing bed, which is coated with platinum and palladium. The purpose of the oxidizing bed is to complete the combustion of CO by adding oxygen. The oxidizing bed also uses oxygen to burn any of the raw HCs that still remain in the exhaust gases.
P0420 Diagnostic Theory for Shops and Technicians
The P0420 code is set when the Catalyst monitor sees a decrease in voltage from the rear Monitoring Oxygen Sensor(s) and an increase in switching activity-from rich to lean to rich, etc.-that closely resembles the front Oxygen Sensor(s) during the time the computer is activating the Catalytic Converter monitor test. The voltage threshold is usually a minimum of 650 millivolts, which indicates a low level of oxygen. When the voltage goes too far below the 650 millivolt minimum, it indicates a higher level of oxygen. This means that not all of the oxygen is being consumed by the combustion process or by the afterburning effect of the Catalytic Converter. When the oxygen level gets too high, it means that the Cerium or Oxygen storage bed has degraded to the point where it is no longer able to store oxygen created by the reduction of NOx (nitrogen and oxygen). This oxygen is essential for the rear Oxidation bed to complete the conversion of CO into CO2 and HCs into H20 and CO2.
Common Tests for Diagnosis of the P0420 Code
  • Retrieve the code and write down the freeze frame information to be used as a baseline to test and verify any repair.
  • If there are any misfires, ignition, fuel and/or intake problems, these must be repaired before the Catalyst code is addressed. Any misfire, ignition, and/or fuel system problem will quickly ruin a Catalyst. They are often the cause for code in the first place.
  • Test drive the vehicle at or near the freeze frame conditions to verify that the rear Catalyst Monitoring Oxygen sensor is either mirroring the front Oxygen sensor and/or is not reaching the 650 millivolt threshold during 55-60 MPH cruise conditions. If either of theses conditions can be easily verified, then the Catalytic Converter is defective.
  • If there is any doubt about the condition of the front and/or rear Oxygen sensors, then check the Mode 6 data for all the Oxygen sensor monitor tests. If any of the front or rear Oxygen sensors barely pass their Mode 6 tests, then clear all codes and perform a drive cycle to see how well the front and rear Oxygen sensors pass their Mode 6 tests. They need to pass the Mode 6 tests with flying colors or they will confuse the OBD-II diagnostic software and possibly trigger a false code P0420. This is an important concept because if the front Oxygen sensor is slow and barely passes its monitor tests, it can fool the computer into thinking that the Catalyst has failed because the computer just watches how closely the switching speed of the front Oxygen sensor compares to the switching speed of the rear Monitoring Oxygen sensor. If the rear Monitoring Oxygen sensor is losing bandwidth and not able to easily reach the 650 milli volt threshold-but still barely passes its monitor tests-then it, too, can fool the computer into setting a P0420 code.
  • If the Catalyst has failed, be sure to check for any software updates for the power-train computer. Many of the OBD II-equipped vehicles require software updates whenever the Catalyst is replaced

Jun 17, 2014 | 2004 Isuzu Rodeo

1 Answer

2004 PT Cruiser Turbo won't pass smog test because computer monitors haven't completely reset after battery failure. It's been driven 235 miles and only 2 monitors remain unset (oxygen and


The system has to see a wide range of conditions before a smog test can be done. On most brands you have to drive at least 50 miles, at various speeds including stop and go, let it idle for 5 - 10 minutes, and run at freeway speed for at least 25 miles. It also has to reach normal operating temp of 195 degrees.

Apr 22, 2013 | 2004 Chrysler PT Cruiser

1 Answer

Tried getting ford f150 4.2 2003 inspected. Replaced air filter and fuel filter already. Check engine lit was on before replacing them . Now check engine light is out . But won't pass inspection.


As for your codes p1131 and 1151: Ford - Lack Of Heated Oxygen Sensor Bank 1 Sensor 1 Switches - Sensor Indicates Lean


Last week I had the very same catalyst, evap and ECG codes come up on my 1999 Mercury Mystique which is like a Ford Taurus. A friend was able to find a hole or leak in the hose connected, replaced it and it runs fine. I havent run it a full and straight 50 miles yet to clear the check engine light but that repair alone changed the entire way the car was poorly driving. Im sure that hasnt fixed all the probs but thats a good starting point.

Mar 04, 2013 | 2003 Ford F150 Regular Cab

1 Answer

Mercury sable 1998 WON'T pass smog. Check engine


PO402--EGR Flow Excessive Detected

There are other components besides the
egr valve in that sytem,so you got things to
diagnose there you skipped over

PO443---Evap Control System Canister Purge

Valve Circuit Malfunction


PO1409--EGR Vacuum Regulator Solenoid
Circuit Malfuntion


PO420 & PO430--Catalyst System Efficiency
Below Threshold---Basically worn out exhaust
converters you will need to replace


Advice--take to a repair shop & go thru the entire
car & resolve ALL Issues

Oct 18, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1999 Subruban 1500 LT Failed Emissions Test: Catalyst Not Ready EVAP Not Ready O2 Sens HTR Not Ready EGR Not Ready Fault Codes: No codes Present -------> Check Engine light is not on.


You may have a defective coolant or air temp sensor. These need to be accurate in order for some of the monitors to run. Your going to need a diagnostic scanner to see the data so you can determine what is wrong.

If you had replaced or unhooked the battery just pryor to geting the smog then thats the problem. Just drive the truck for a couple days and you should be fine.

You will still pass the test if you still have 2 monitors not set. California allows that. 3 fail

Feb 18, 2010 | 1999 Chevrolet Suburban

1 Answer

CAN YOU TELL ME WHAT THE P1000 CODE MEANS FOR A 1999 FORD F-150 PICK UP TRUCK


P1000 means a drive cycle has not completed, it will only clear itself after driving the vehicle through certain driving conditions. If you try to clear the code, it will reappear until you repeat the drive cycle. I am not too familiar with what AE will show, but if you can access Mode 6 data or the OBD Drive Cycle(These are two options from the IDS at Ford), It may help to show what tests have either failed or not completed. Heres what must be done to clear the P1000:


Note: The IAT PID must be between 10-38°C (50-100° F) during the OBD II drive cycle to enter into all the OBD II monitors. The FLI PID must be between 15% and 85% at all times.

Drive in stop-and-go traffic with at lease 4 idle periods (30 seconds each) while observing the status of the OBD II monitor on the scan tool. If the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), heated oxygen sensor (HO2S), evaporative emission (EVAP), secondary air (AIR) (if applicable) or catalyst efficiency monitor have not completed, drive on the highway at a constant speed over 64 km/hr (40 mph) not to exceed 104 km/hr (65 mph) for up to 15 minutes. Heavy accelerations, sudden decelerations and wide open throttles are not recommended. If the scan tool sends out a three pulse beep at any time, the OBD II drive cycle has completed.

If there is only one certain component that hasn't completed its test, there are individual driving conditions to help those tests pass or fail if something is wrong.

Jun 23, 2009 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Will not pass inpection, 5 sensors not ready--V6 3.0


Drive the car for 2 miles non-stop and take it to smog inspection WITH OUT TURNING OFF THE CAR!! the key is that the car goes threw the test while the engine is running ...

if the car is turned off ... u will have to repeat procedure ...

Apr 17, 2009 | 1998 Mitsubishi Montero Sport

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