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Blows blue oily smoke from exhaust when reving not under load, and has a wet fouled spark plug in cylinder 2. I am curious as to what is the most likely path for the oil to be getting into the cylinder from? Cheers

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You have a crack in the block that is letting in radiator fluid into the no 2 cylinder the oily smoke is really steam from the water that is vaporizing in the cylinder.

Posted on Oct 15, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

InMrFixIt
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SOURCE: thick blue smoke. no oil

Hi! Chris, There are many causes of oil burning or exhaust smoke. There are three different causes of normal oil burning, 1; worn valve guides (smoking during deceleration), 2; worn cylinders and piston rings (smoking during acceleration), 3; split or worn out valve seal, or damaged intake manifold gasket (smoking all the time). Of course there are several variables in this equation. Sometimes coolant can also get into a cylinder and cause a blueish smoke. If you remove the spark plugs and use a pressure pump on the coolant system (radiator), coolant should leak into the intake manifold or cylinder. Coolant leaking into the intake manifold will leak into several cylinder through the valves. So, what year and how many miles are on the Jaguar?

Posted on Aug 09, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: engine blowing oil from oil filler cap

I had the same problem. I changed the pcv valve and checked the hose. It still did the same thing. Then I checked the metal tubing that the hose connects to and found it was full of hardened gunk. I sprayed PB Blaster into the tube let it soak for awhile. Then took an old choke cable, put it on a drill and ran it into the tube like a drain snake. It took a while of doing this over and over but eventually got it cleared out. Now, no more oil all over the engine and hood compartment.  

Posted on Mar 21, 2009

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SOURCE: 95 eclipse gst 2.0 smoking out exhaust, smells of

needs rings

Posted on Jun 12, 2009

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SOURCE: 302 v8 not firing on 2 cylinders

do a compression test.sound like your engine piston rings and valve guides are worn out.

Posted on Jul 20, 2009

  • 2002 Answers

SOURCE: blue smoke from exhaust

Blue smoke is a sign that oil is being burnt in the combustion process. It is normally a sign of high engine mileage. Definately a compression test would be in order to try to pinpoint the cause. In addition to high mileage it could be something like a broken piston ring or a valve not seating properly. It might also be possible that you turbo has a bad seal and is putting oil into the air as it spins. This problem should definately be looked into soon. Hope this helps.

Posted on Sep 05, 2009

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2007 ford 4.0 v6 why are all my spark plugdls on passenger side oil soaked but drivers side is fine doesn't smoke did compression test all good not a blown intake gasket had it checked anyone know?


Hi Josh:
I'd put fresh plugs in it and drive it for a week, then check the plugs.
Sometimes you will get high compression readings that are not valid because the rings are soaked in oil so they think they are sealed when they are not.
With the engine off, you could try removing the oil filler cap when the engine is hot, then restart it. A little vapour is OK, a lot indicates bad valve guides, head gasket,or ring blowby.
Also, try checking inside the exhaust tailpipe. If it is oily sooty it is also an indication of possible ring problems.
Review the maintenance history. How many miles on the engine? Could be the engine is getting tired.

Jan 31, 2016 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to check fouled plugs


remove spark plug wire than remove plug and look at the plug end should be clean --black build up =carbon///wet oily =burning oil usually shows up with a blue cloud oil getting into cylinder

Apr 09, 2014 | 1993 Toyota Tercel

1 Answer

1991 Honda Accord, 213k, changed oily sparkplugs and now engine blows excessive smoke and oil continuously out the exaust from start up to shut down.


Old spark plugs were likely fouled with oil and not burning fuel (and oil) completely so minimal smoke before change out. New plugs are clean and burning everything in cylinders well including oil (therefore more smoke). If smoke from exhaust is blue, then engine oil is getting into cylinders either through worn out piston rings, or a leaking gasket. If black smoke, then this is a sign of too much fuel getting into cylinders and not all the fuel is getting burnt during combustion (a fuel system problem).

Sep 06, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1992 es300 blue smoke from exhaust


The most common cause of blue exhaust smoke is oil leaking past engine seals and into the cylinders where it then mixes and burns with the fuel. Oil leaking into the cylinders can cause a rough idle, misfire and fouled spark plugs. So best bet is to have a local repair shop inspect for internal oil leakage.

Oct 16, 2012 | 1994 Lexus Es 300

2 Answers

I have a 1991 d150 p/u and it has blue smoke from exhaust when started


If it smokes more when you first start it than other times, the common cause is leaking valve guides in the cyl heads.
The guides leak oil into the cylinders when the engine is not running.
Most other causes would make the engine smoke when running or under load too.

Aug 02, 2012 | 1991 Dodge D150

1 Answer

CHUCKS OUT CLOUDS OF BLUE SMOKE.


Blue Smoke: Blue smoke is caused by engine oil entering the cylinder area and being burned along with the fuel air mixture. As with the white smoke, just a small drop of oil leaking into the cylinder can produce blue smoke out the tailpipe. Blue smoke is more likely in older or higher mileage vehicles than newer cars with fewer miles.

How did the engine oil get inside the cylinder in the first place? The car has many seals, gaskets, and O-rings that are designed to keep the engine oil from entering the cylinder, and one of them has failed. If too much oil leaks into the cylinder and fouls the spark plug, it will cause a misfire (engine miss) in that cylinder, and the spark plug will have to be replaced or cleaned of the oil. Using thicker weight engine oil or an oil additive designed to reduce oil leaks might help reduce the amount of oil leaking into the cylinder.

Jun 07, 2010 | Fiat X1/9 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

My vitara p reg 2L started smoking on start up, now it is misfiring any ideas where i start, I can't see any spark plugs in the engine-maybe i'm blind or stupid


Many new cars hide most of the engine underneath plastic covers that must be removed to find anything. The smoking problem may or may not be serious, but it's likely that the spark plugs will show black oily deposits on the interior insulators. Cleaning or replacing the plugs will usually make the engine run ok for awhile, but with continued smoking, it will foul the plugs again. If all the plugs are fouled, then look for something like a bad PCV valve that creates crankcase pressure when plugged. Worn out valve seals which allow oil to leak into the cylinders can account for smoking only on start-up. These seals can usually be replaced without pulling the cylinder head. Hope this helps!

May 21, 2010 | 1999 Suzuki Vitara

1 Answer

Blue smoke


Blue smoke is never a good thing....

Blue smoke is caused by engine oil entering the cylinder area and being burned along with the fuel air mixture. As with the white smoke, just a small drop of oil leaking into the cylinder can produce blue smoke out the tailpipe. Blue smoke is more likely in older or higher mileage vehicles than newer cars with fewer miles.
How did the engine oil get inside the cylinder in the first place? The car has many seals, gaskets, and O-rings that are designed to keep the engine oil from entering the cylinder, and one of them has failed. If too much oil leaks into the cylinder and fouls the spark plug, it will cause a misfire (engine miss) in that cylinder, and the spark plug will have to be replaced or cleaned of the oil. Using thicker weight engine oil or an oil additive designed to reduce oil leaks might help reduce the amount of oil leaking into the cylinder.

your engine has worn valve guides, piston rings An engine that burns a lot of oil (more than a quart in 500 miles) is an engine that needs to be overhauled. Normal oil consumption should be a quart or less in 1500 miles. Most newer engines consume less than half a quart of oil between oil changes (every 3000 miles). So if your engine is burning oil, it's essentially worn out and needs to be repaired.
Because the cost of overhauling or replacing an engine often exceeds the value of an older car or truck, many people will just keep on driving a "mosquito fogger" in spite of the blue clouds of smoke it leaves behind. Never mind the pollution it causes, oil is cheaper than a new or rebuilt engine they reason. That philosophy may be okay if you live out in the sticks somewhere. But in urban areas that require periodic vehicle emissions testing, an engine that's burning oil usually won't pass the test because of excessive hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. You may get by on a waiver after you've spent some money (in vain) on a tune-up, but the fact remains you're still a polluter.
An engine that burns a lot of oil will also eventually foul the spark plugs. Thick, black oily deposits build up on the plugs until they cease to fire. Then the engine misfires and loses power. Cleaning or changing the plugs may temporarily solve the problem, but sooner or later they'll foul out again.
Forget about "miracle" oil additives or pills that claim to stop oil burning. They don't. Better to save your money and put it towards a valve job and new set of rings.

Feb 23, 2010 | 1990 Ford Festiva

1 Answer

Sputtering during idle blue smoke


You are burning oil, causing the blue smoke. It is mainly cause by worn piston rings. Also will coat your spark plugs with oily residue. Try an oil additive such as "stop smoke" or another such brand to reduce burning your oil and it may recondition your seal sand stop it all together.

Nov 20, 2008 | 1989 Mitsubishi Mighty Max

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