Question about 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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1999 4.7 v8 Engine cooling problem!! I have replaced radiator due to small leak, both fans work, system is full of coolant as visible thru coolant bleed port. Top hose gets hot indicating flow. However, she still overheats. Is there a way to test water pump output pressure to ensure that the flow I'm sensing is sufficient? I have heard that the coolant sustem bleeding process is key to maintaing temp? The system is full, could there be air pockets in block? I'm stuck!!!! thanks, curt

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  • curt_wallaue Apr 23, 2009

    Thanks, she runs like a charm now. The thermo was placed in backwards!!!!! Duh!

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Replace the waterpump and thermostat

Posted on Apr 20, 2009

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What to do when 2006 Chrysler Pacifica engine temp warning light comes on?


Do not continue to operate. Operating an overheated engine will cause the engine to fail.

After the engine has cooled,
Confirm that the engine has coolant.
Confirm that the reservoir is full to the mark
Start engine and confirm as engine gets warm cooling fan at radiator turns on

Confirm that the rubber engine belt is working
Put in car heater to full hot and blower on.
Confirm heat is hot from car heater.
If heater is not hot possible water pump failure or air in coolant system keeping the coolant from circulating.
Allow to cool completely.
Remove cap start engine and observe coolant flowing at or near cap. Observe bubbling or exhaust gases coming from radiator

Check for water in oil by pulling dip stick
  • White smoke from the exhaust pipe
  • Overheating engine
  • Bubbles in the radiator or coolant overflow tank
  • White milky oil
  • Significant loss of coolant with no visible leaks
If milky likely a blown head gasket

Hope this helps?
headgasket001-hioxyjzsrsihrx1txyibv0ns-4-2.jpg

Jun 29, 2017 | Chrysler Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Overheating


Physically look in the radiator under the cap(if one exsist's) when cool, for coolant level, and check the valve in the cap for sticking. If air is present in the radiator it can't get out, and more coolant can't get in,(from the overflow). Either clean the cap or replace it and check that it is the CORRECT cap.

If radiator is low on coolant fill it to overflowing, replace cap, and check that coolant overflow is filled to the COLD line or mark. The overflow is normally where you would add coolant. (never overfill the overflow)After refilling as outlined above, check the level every morning for 2 or 3 days until coolant level stops dropping below the cold mark and add coolant to the overflow ONLY. Do not open the radiator cap. Also, if you have even a tiny coolant leak anywhere in the system, air will get drawn in, instead of coolant from the overflow.

For more OVERHEATING PROBLEMS try these...
Radiator fins dirty, clean with a strong stream of water, not high pressure water.
Radiator clogged, try backflushing it, or replace.
Thermostat stuck open or shut, replace it. Or installed BACKWARDS.
Water pump worn out, can no longer move enough coolant, replace it.
Fan shroud broken or missing....
Electric Fan(s) not working, Check the fan, relay, fuse and engine temperature sensor's.
Belt driven fan, belt slipping, fan clutch is bad, fan blades have flattened out.

Air dam under front bumper is gone, loose, or broken. It actually has a purpose other than scraping on the driveway or curbs. It forces air up into and thru the condenser and radiator. If it's loose, airflow can actually push it out of place making it useless or blocking the airflow. Along with that, there may also be a plastic piece attached to the bottom of, and wraps up behind the bumper. If it's loose, airflow can actually push it out of place blocking the airflow. Simply reattach it with 4 or 5 screws.

Also, if the vehicle has A/C and electric fans, one fan is dedicated to the A/C and should come on almost the instant the A/C is turned on. The engine fan will run even with the key off, that is normal. The system is trying to cool itself. Hope this helps.

Normally, you shouldn't have to bleed the cooling system but, there are two bleed valves. (these are the most logical locations)One is just above the water pump, and the other is on the thermostat housing. They are really small, and due to the age of your car, they will be brittle and almost impossible to open without breaking them.
You don't want to break them. If you are hearing air circulating thru the cooling system, try this and let me know how you make out.....

Mar 17, 2013 | 1985 Buick Skylark

1 Answer

Burp radiator


Physically look in the radiator under the cap(if one exsist's) when cool, for coolant level, and check the valve in the cap for sticking. If air is present in the radiator it can't get out, and more coolant can't get in,(from the overflow). Either clean the cap or replace it and check that it is the CORRECT cap.

If radiator is low on coolant fill it to overflowing, replace cap, and check that coolant overflow is filled to the COLD line or mark. The overflow is normally where you would add coolant. (never overfill the overflow)After refilling as outlined above, check the level every morning for 2 or 3 days until coolant level stops dropping below the cold mark and add coolant to the overflow ONLY. Do not open the radiator cap. Also, if you have even a tiny coolant leak anywhere in the system, air will get drawn in, instead of coolant from the overflow.

For more OVERHEATING PROBLEMS try these...
Radiator fins dirty, clean with a strong stream of water, not high pressure water.
Radiator clogged, try backflushing it, or replace.
Thermostat stuck open or shut, replace it. Or installed BACKWARDS.
Water pump worn out, can no longer move enough coolant, replace it.
Fan shroud broken or missing....
Electric Fan(s) not working, Check the fan, relay, fuse and engine temperature sensor's.
Belt driven fan, belt slipping, fan clutch is bad, fan blades have flattened out.

Air dam under front bumper is gone, loose, or broken. It actually has a purpose other than scraping on the driveway or curbs. It forces air up into and thru the condenser and radiator. If it's loose, airflow can actually push it out of place making it useless or blocking the airflow. Along with that, there may also be a plastic piece attached to the bottom of, and wraps up behind the bumper. If it's loose, airflow can actually push it out of place blocking the airflow. Simply reattach it with 4 or 5 screws.

Also, if the vehicle has A/C and electric fans, one fan is dedicated to the A/C and should come on almost the instant the A/C is turned on. The engine fan will run even with the key off, that is normal. The system is trying to cool itself. Hope this helps.

Normally, you shouldn't have to bleed the cooling system but, there are two bleed valves. (these are the most logical locations)One is just above the water pump, and the other is on the thermostat housing. They are really small, and due to the age of your car, they will be brittle and almost impossible to open without breaking them.
You don't want to break them. If you are hearing air circulating thru the cooling system, try this and let me know how you make out.....

Mar 17, 2013 | 1996 Chevrolet Cavalier

2 Answers

I have a 1999 oldsmobile intrigue with a 3.5 engine and it is overheating what might be the problem?


It's usually the thermostat, I woud pressure test the cap. It may need to be flushed. Are the fans working? Is there a 50/50 mix of anti-freeze

Sep 11, 2011 | 1999 Oldsmobile Intrigue

1 Answer

2001 Expedition started overheating about two weeks ago. It normally runs about mid-range on the temp gauge, but when it overheats it shoots up into the red range within a couple of seconds. When I pop the...


You have air in the top of the engine.
The antifreeze spewing out of the overflow happens due to your perfectly functional radiator cap
passing the overheated coolant/air mixture out of the system into the reservior (in an attempt
to relieve overpressurization of the cooling system)
The sudden nature of your overheating comes from the boiling of the inadequate amount of
coolant/antifreeze in your engine, since it cant properly cool the engine, except for the first
10-25 minutes of operation - after that, it boils (overheats quickly), then pressure rises immediately
within the cooling system.
The Fix is free: locate and open the (air) bleeder port at the top of the engine, and add the usual
50% coolant/50% water mixture to the radiator until the radiator is full to the level indicated in
your owner's manual (or the "Full" line). Then close the bleeder port and replace the rad (radiator)
cap.
The air bleeder port is normally located near the thermostat, and should be opened each time
that coolant is added to the radiator. The air bleeder port need not be opened when adding
50/50 coolant to the reservior, since the rad cap is going to be closed while adding coolant
to this part of the cooling system.
Warning: driving beyond the point where your engine temperature gauge indicates overheating will
destroy the car's engine - it'll seize up due to overheating, and the only fix for a seized/burned-up
engine is replacement (of the engine). Seizing an engine is really easy with an air bubble in the
top of the engine - you could easily burn up/warp the head, necessitating replacement of the head
and head gasket.

Sep 03, 2011 | 1999 Ford Expedition

2 Answers

My Chevy Venture 1999 when I drived the temperature was normally, but when I stay the temperature was hot. I changed the termosthator but the problem is continually.


Check the coolant reservoir and the radiator for proper coolant level. If low you probably have a leaking intake gasket or possibly a head gasket leak. The intake leak will be visible on either end of the intake manifold, located at the very top portion of the engine. The head gasket usually shows up at the rear head, nearest the belt. You could have a water pump leaking and this would show coolant on the ground under the right front of the engine, more so when the engine is running. They are very common for all 3 problems.

Mar 02, 2011 | 1999 Chevrolet Venture

2 Answers

1999 chevy tahoe 5.7L vortec 350 new thermostat,new radiator,new waterpump.still overheating?


REPLACE RADIATOR PRESSURE CAP AND CHECK THE COOLING FAN CLUTCH.WHEN YOUR ENGINE HOT WHEN YOU TRY TURNING CLUTCH FAN WITH YOUR HAND WHEN ENGINE IS HOT.THERE SHOULD BE RESISTANCE IN THE FAN.IF CLUTCH FAN SPINS FREELY WHILE ENGINE HOT.YOU NEED TO REMOVE COOLING FAN TO REPLACE CLUTCH.

Feb 23, 2011 | Chevrolet Tahoe Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

My 1996 olds. aurora keeps over heating. I can just put coolant in the radiator and seconds after I start the engine, I get a low coolant reading in the information display. In addition, it spits...


Hello,

There are several problems that could be leading to an engine overheating. I will discuss some of them and you can try to act on which solutions that can help.

THERMOSTAT STUCK SHOT The thermostat, which is usually located in a housing where the upper radiator hose connects to the engine, controls the operating temperature of the engine. It does this by blocking the flow of coolant from the engine to the radiator until the engine reaches a certain temperature (usually 190 to 195 degrees F.). When this temperature is reached, the thermostat opens and allows coolant to circulate from the engine to the radiator.
If the thermostat fails to open, which can happen due to mechanical failure or if a steam pocket forms under the thermostat due to incomplete filling of the cooling system or coolant loss, no coolant will circulate between the engine and radiator, and the engine will quickly overheat.
You can check for this condition by carefully touching the upper radiator hose when the engine is first started and is warming up. If the upper radiator hose does not become hot to the touch within several minutes after starting the engine, it means the thermostat is probably defective and needs to be replaced.
CAUTION: The replacement thermostat should always have the same temperature rating as the original. Do not substitute a colder or hotter thermostat on any vehicle that has computerized engine controls as engine operating temperature affects the operation of the fuel, ignition and emissions control systems.


DEFECTIVE FAN CLUTCH
On rear wheel drive vehicles with belt-driven cooling fan, a "fan clutch" is often used to improve fuel economy. The clutch is a viscous-coupling filled with silicone oil. The clutch allows the fan to slip at high speed, which reduces the parasitic horsepower drag on the engine. If the clutch slips too much, however, the fan may not turn fast enough to keep the engine cool.
The silicone fluid inside the clutch breaks down over time and can leak out due to wear, too. If you see oily streaks radiating outward on the clutch (and/or the fan can be spun by hand with little or no resistance when the engine is off), it means the clutch is bad and needs to be replaced. Any play or wobble in the fan due to wear in the clutch also signals the need for a new clutch.


EXTERNAL COOLANT LEAKS

Leaks in radiator or heater hoses, the water pump, radiator, heater core or engine freeze plugs can allow coolant to escape. No engine can tolerate the loss of coolant for very long, so it usually overheats as soon as a leak develops.
A visual inspection of the cooling system and engine will usually reveal where the coolant is going.
Leaks in hoses can only be fixed by replacing the hose. Leaks in the water pump also require replacing the pump. But leaks in a radiator, heater hose or freeze plug may sometimes respond to a sealer added to the cooling system.


WEAK OR LEAKY RADIATOR CAP
If no leaks are apparent, the radiator cap should be pressure tested to make sure it is holding the specified pressure. If the spring inside the cap is weak (or the cap is the wrong one for the application), the engine will lose coolant out the overflow tube every time it gets hot.

INTERNAL COOLANT LEAK
If there are no visible coolant leaks, but the engine is using coolant, there may be a crack in the cylinder head or block, or a leaky head gasket that is allowing coolant to escape into the combustion chamber or crankcase.

EXHAUST RESTRICTION
In some instances a severe exhaust restriction can produce enough backpressure to cause an engine to overheat. The most likely cause of the blockage would be a plugged catalytic converter or a crushed or damaged pipe. Checking intake vacuum and/or exhaust backpressure can diagnose this kind of problem.

BAD WATER PUMP
In a high mileage engine, the impeller that pumps the coolant through the engine inside the water pump may be so badly corroded that the blades are loose or eaten away. If such is the case, the pump must be replaced. Most pump failures, however, occur at the pump shaft bearing and seal. After tens of thousands of miles of operation, the bearing and seal wear out. Coolant starts to leak out past the shaft seal, which may cause the engine to overheat due to the loss of coolant. A sealer additive will not stop this kind of leak. Replacing the water pump is the only cure.
CAUTION: A leaky water pump should be replaced without delay, not only to reduce the risk of engine overheating but to prevent catastrophic pump failure. If the shaft breaks on a rear-wheel drive vehicle, the fan may go forward and chew into the radiator ruining the radiator.


INOPERATIVE FAN MOTOR
On most front-wheel drive cars, the fan that cools the radiator is driven by an electric motor. A temperature switch or coolant sensor on the engine cycles the fan on and off as additional cooling is needed. If the temperature switch or coolant sensor (or the relay that routes power to the fan motor is bad), the fan won't come on when it is needed and the engine will overheat. Likewise, if the fan motor itself is bad, the fan won't work.
The system needs to be diagnosed to determine where the problem is so the correct component can be replaced.

Also check if you are not having a blockage in the coolants hose.

Take care and good luck

Oct 26, 2010 | 1996 Oldsmobile Aurora

2 Answers

Where is the thermostat sensor


Both the 4.0L and 4.7L engines use 195� thermostats for all model years from 1999-2004. When replacing a thermostat it is very important to install one with the same temperature rating (the only exception might be with certain performance modifications or chips that recommend or require a different temperature thermostat).

4.0L engine - Draining the cooling system WARNING: DO NOT REMOVE THE CYLINDER BLOCK DRAIN PLUGS OR LOOSEN THE RADIATOR DRAINCOCK WITH SYSTEM HOT AND UNDER PRESSURE. SERIOUS BURNS FROM COOLANT CAN OCCUR.

1. DO NOT remove radiator cap first. With engine cold, locate radiator draincock on the right lower side of radiator facing to rear of vehicle.
2. Attach one end of a hose to the draincock. Put the other end into a clean container. Open draincock and drain coolant from radiator. This will empty the coolant reserve/overflow tank. The coolant does not have to be removed from the tank unless the system is being refilled with a fresh mixture. When tank is empty, remove radiator cap and continue draining cooling system. To drain the engine block of coolant, remove the cylinder block drain plug, located on the side of cylinder block below the exhaust manifold.

4.0L engine - refilling the cooling system Coolant recommendations and cautions: The recommended mixture is 50/50 ethylene-glycol and low mineral content water. Never use pure antifreeze. Only Mopar Antifreeze Coolant, 5 Year/100,000 Mile Formula (glycol base coolant with corrosion inhibitors called HOAT) is recommended. This coolant offers the best engine cooling without corrosion when mixed with 50% distilled water. Antifreeze mixture must always be at least 44%, all climates year round. Maximum protection (-90d) is provided with a 68% mixture protection. If the percentage is lower than 44 percent, engine parts may be eroded by cavitation, and cooling system components may be severely damaged by corrosion. CAUTION: Mopar Antifreeze/Coolant, 5 Year/100,000 Mile Formula (MS-9769) may not be mixed with any other type of antifreeze. Mixing of coolants other than specified (non-HOAT or other HOAT), may result in engine damage that may not be covered under the new vehicle warranty, and decreased corrosion protection.

CAUTION: Do not use coolant additives that are claimed to improve engine cooling. 4.0L coolant capacity: 1999-2000: 13.0 qts. (including 2.3 qts. for resevoir) 2001-2004: 15.0 qts. (including 1 qt. for resevoir)

1. Tighten the radiator draincock and the cylinder block drain plug(s) (if removed).
2. Fill system using a 50/50 mixture of ethyleneglycol antifreeze and low mineral content water. Fill radiator to top and install radiator cap. Add sufficient coolant to the reserve/overflow tank to raise level to FULL mark.
3. With heater control unit in the HEAT position, operate engine with radiator cap in place.
4. After engine has reached normal operating temperature, shut engine off and allow it to cool. When engine is cooling down, coolant will be drawn into the radiator from the reserve/overflow tank.
5. Add coolant to reserve/overflow tank as necessary. Only add coolant to the reserve/overflow tank when the engine is cold. Coolant level in a warm engine will be higher due to thermal expansion. To purge the cooling system of all air, this heat up/cool down cycle (adding coolant to cold engine) must be performed three times. Add necessary coolant to raise tank level to the FULL mark after each cool down period.

For more details, you can refer to the Jeep WJ Service Manual Section-07-Cooling-System-Ewj7

Hope helped.

Nov 02, 2009 | 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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