Question about 1997 Dodge Dakota

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Electrical gages not working

Speedometer, tachometer, oil pressure and alternator gages not working

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Had blown fuse 10A, fixed problem.

Posted on Apr 19, 2009

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2003 4500. Why have gauges stopped working?


You could have anyone of a number of different problems . I know your year vehicle falls in the range of GM instrument culster problems . There are little stepper motors ( electric motors ) that make the gauges move . There could be DTC'S - diagnostic trouble codes stored in the instrument cluster . An you have to know how the instrument cluster knows how much to move the needles on the gauges . All the input sensors to the PCM/ECM - engine computer vehicle speed sensor , fuel pressure , oil pressure , etc... All the modules on the truck are hooked together on a serial data communication network .The PCM/ECM sends this information out on the data bus for the other moduels that need the info .
Engine Oil Pressure (EOP) Gage
The IPC displays the engine oil pressure on the analog EOP gage as determined by the PCM. The PCM monitors the signal circuit of the EOP sensor. When the EOP sensor resistance is high, the engine oil pressure is high. When the EOP sensor resistance is low, the engine oil pressure is low. The IPC receives a class 2 message from the PCM indicating the engine oil pressure. The EOP gage defaults to 0 kPa (0 psi) when the following conditions occur:
• The PCM detects a malfunction in the engine oil pressure sensor signal circuit. Refer to Diagnostic System Check - Instrument Cluster .
• The IPC detects a loss of class 2 communication with the PCM.
Speedometer
The IPC displays the vehicle speed on the analog speedometer based on the vehicle speed signal from the PCM. The PCM converts the data from the vehicle speed sensor to a 4000 pulses/mile signal. The IPC uses the vehicle speed signal circuit from the PCM in order to calculate the vehicle speed.
The powertrain control module (PCM) creates the vehicle speed signal by pulsing the signal circuit to ground at a rate of 4K PPM. The instrument panel cluster (IPC) converts the 4K PPM signal to a speedometer position. The IPC also receives a class 2 message from the PCM indicating the vehicle speed. The IPC uses this class 2 message for diagnostic purposes.
There could be up to twenty different DTC'S stored ,here is an a for instance
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DTC B1365
The instrument panel cluster (IPC) uses the ignition 0 voltage circuit in order to supply voltage to various indicators and gages. The IPC also receives a class 2 message from the serial data gateway module (SDGM) indicating the current power mode. Your best bet would be to take your vehicle to the Dealer or an ASE certified independant repair shop .

Dec 21, 2015 | 2003 Chevrolet Express

1 Answer

Just had my 1988 Chevy truck transmission rebuilt. Now my oil pressure gage and speedometer gage don't work, nor the mileage doesn't move. What did they not hook back up?


check the speedometer cable is connected at the transmission and the cable is not broken. check the oil sender unit is connected, it can be found near the oil filter.

Dec 24, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

My 2004 Trailblazer tachometer, speedometer, and oil pressure gages don't work.


First thing I'd look at is replacing your ignition switch. This is notorious for making the guages work quirky or go out. If not, the little stepper motors on the back of each gauage are easy to replace.

Mar 04, 2011 | 2004 Chevrolet TrailBlazer

1 Answer

I have a 1996 Jeep Cherokee Classic. My Tachometer, Fuel Gage, and Speedometer quit working a few months ago. The Oil pressure,and Temperature gages work fine. All fuses are fine. I suspect a grounging...


have you tried working on one problem at a time?
have you check the body computer for any codes?
and to also verify the bus line is ok.
if you find nothing wrong with BCM or bus,
try checking the speed sensor for an output signal or if the gear is bad.

Nov 18, 2009 | 1996 Jeep Cherokee Country

2 Answers

My two thousand jeep starsts then shuts off engine light comes on check gages what are the gages


You probably recently had a new key made, and the Jeep ignition is chipped. The key has a sensor, and must be programmed to match the ignition. Some will start till you put it in gear, then it shuts off.

Nov 17, 2009 | 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Speedometer and Tachometer not working


check the vehicle speed sensor located on the transmission housing.

Apr 11, 2009 | 1992 Oldsmobile Custom Cruiser

1 Answer

Dash lights don't work


did you check for loose connections in the wiring harness, fuse box, or fuses?

Jan 12, 2009 | 1992 Jeep Wrangler

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