Question about 1999 Pontiac Grand Prix

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What are the symptoms of a faulty oxygen sensor?

Car stalls after idling for a little while (1-2 min) . If the car stays on the cars RPMs bounce up and down. Like its trying to stay running or something!

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  • Pontiac Master
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Bad oxygen sensor will make a car run rough.also mass air flow sensor egr valve sticking open or pvc valve open.idle speed control problems.have your car scan.because there are many sensor causes it to run rough.

Posted on Apr 16, 2009

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Rough idle in drive, correct rpm


Car idle is rough Inspection Service & Cost A rough idling engine can be caused by a number of issues, some of them are serious while others tend to be minor, but the symptoms remain pretty much the same. The car will feel rough and bouncy when the engine is running. The car will also idle below its regular speed, display inconsistent RPMs and may produce a shaking, skipping or slipping sound when the vehicle is running.
While a rough idling engine may seem to be a simple inconvenience it often indicates a deeper problem within the engine. The vehicle should be inspected and repaired as soon as possible because small problems have a way of turning into expensive repairs. How this system works: The idle speed of an engine is basically the rotational speed the engine runs on when it is un-coupled from the drivetrain and the throttle pedal is not being depressed. The idle speed is measured in the revolutions per minute of the crankshaft.
When an engine is running at idle speed it generates enough power to smoothly operate equipment such as the water pump, alternator, and power steering but not enough power to move the vehicle itself. A passenger car will usually idle between 600 RPMs and 1000 RPMs. A properly functioning idle should run smoothly without skipping or slipping. Common reasons for this to happen:
  • Dirty Fuel Injectors: The fuel injection system injects fuel into the cylinders, which creates a mix of air, and fuel to ignite and burn. Fuel injectors have tiny nozzles to spray the fuel into the cylinder and they can become clogged over time. clogged or failing fuel injector creates a lack of fuel in the vehicle's engine. This can cause a rough idle, it can also cause symptoms such as slow acceleration or the car not feeling as if it has enough power. If the problem is addressed early, it is possible to clean the injectors, which will restore them to full function. If this condition is not addressed in a timely manner the injectors will need to be replaced. Incorrect Idle Speed: While the average idle speed falls between 600 to 1,000 RPMs, if your vehicle is experiencing a rough idle it could be due to an incorrect idle speed setting. A trained mechanic can easily adjust the idle speed, and it should stay at the proper speed. If an adjusted idle speed becomes inconsistent or changes at random intervals there may be a bigger problem that needs to be explored. Vacuum Leak: If the vacuum system has a leak, it can seriously affect the ability of the vehicle's computer to regulate the air to fuel ratio. This can lead to a rough idle and if the problem is not addressed the car may experience slow acceleration and a lack of power. Vacuum leaks should be inspected and repaired immediately. Incorrectly Installed or Damaged Plugs: Spark plugs are responsible for creating the spark that allows the vehicle to burn fuel. If spark plugs are improperly installed or malfunctioning, the idle speed can be affected. The vehicle's engine may vibrate or there may be slipping or straining sounds coming from the engine. Defective or Clogged Fuel Pump: A rough idle can be related to fuel delivery issues. The fuel pump, which is responsible for pulling fuel from the gas tank to the fuel injectors, can become clogged or defective. If this happens the engine will not get enough fuel, which can cause a rough idle, sputtering, stalling and even slow acceleration. Clogged Fuel Filter: A clogged fuel filter can cause similar problems. The job of the fuel filter is to screen out contaminants in the fuel, over time it will become clogged and need to be replaced. A rough idle is one symptom of a clogged fuel filter. Failing Electrical Components: A problem or failure in the ignition system or various electronic components can cause a rough idle. If this is the case, the problem will usually get worse as RPMs increase. Common culprits include the ignition control module, plug wires, coils, and spark plugs. Defective Airflow Sensor: A defective airflow sensor can be responsible for a rough idle. A mass airflow sensor detects the amount of air coming into the fuel injection system and sends that information to the vehicle's computer. The computer uses that data to deliver the proper amount of fuel to the air in the vehicle. Over time these sensors can malfunction or become dirty. One of the first symptoms of a malfunctioning airflow sensor is a rough idle. The car may also accelerate slowly and even stutter or stall as the problem progresses. Dirty Oxygen Sensor: Oxygen sensors measure how rich or lean the gases are as they exit the combustion chamber. Depending on the results, the amount of fuel entering the engine is adjusted by the vehicle computer. The ultimate goal is to maintain an ideal mixture that produces the lowest emissions. A dirty or failing oxygen sensor will usually trigger the check engine light and can lead to a rough idle, lower fuel efficiency and failed emission test.

Sep 28, 2016 | AC Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 1989 pontiac grand prix keeps stalling once it is warmed up after about 15 minutes of idle.


No, not the oxygen sensor. A couple of things you need to make clear. What light flickers, then stays on? That can't be a sensor light, it would have to be the "check engine light" or an engine temperature light (for like when your cluster has no temperature gauge, but just the "red light").
At any rate, the sensor you changed is not the engine temp. sending unit for the instrument panel. I believe on your '89 there would be two sensors for temp. One is the CTS for the engine computer, and the other is a sending unit for the dash, probably a 1 wire connector. It could be at fault, but it wouldn't cause stalling, I do not think anyway.
If it stalls and won't restart until cooled, this is a symptom of loss of ignition (spark) caused by either a faulty coil, or faulty Ignition Control Module (the coil controller), or last a faulty Crank Position Sensor (this sensor used by computer to determine ignition spark timing). You could test if ignition is lost, by checking for spark right after the engine warms and then stalls. If you have no spark to a spark plug right after it stalls, this is the reason for stalling. Usually it is the crank sensor, rather than the ignition control module or an ignition coil. Your car has 3 coils anyway in a "coil pack", so if one coil went bad, you'd still have two good coils, but engine would only be firing on four of the six cylinders-could easily stall a car.
You should check for trouble codes whenever you have a problem. A code might have been set. Easy to check for codes on your car, just ask if you don't know how-only takes a jumper wire or even a paper clip works. good luck.

Jun 16, 2016 | 1989 Pontiac Grand Prix

1 Answer

How many oxygen sensors are in a 2003 Saturn vue v6


2 x oxygen sensors --one after each cat converter
there are also 2 x heated oxygen sensors ( different operation and reporting system) that are before the cat converters or in the exhaust manifolds run the fault codes to find the faulty sensor and it probably isn't either o2 or ho2 sensors

Feb 22, 2016 | 2003 Saturn VUE

1 Answer

My 2005 chevy cobalt rpm drops very low when coming to a stop. I changed the Oil and Plugs and it helped a little bit. PLEASE HELP


first check the throttle plate for carbon build up the look for the knock sensor harness rubbing onto the fan shroud

Jun 08, 2012 | 2005 Chevrolet Cobalt

2 Answers

Replaced plugs, had a tune up, replaced air filter but still idles high in p&n drive is at around 1000 p&n runs close to 2000. it also runs bad... shakes and if in drive and stopped for to long...


The first thing I would have checked is the TPS, ( throttle position sensor ), this is usually the cause of a high idle.

As far as running bad and fake stalling or stalling, there are 2 very common things that can cause that.

1. MAF, ( mass air flow ), sensor. If this is faulty you will have issues like, bad idle, loss of power when accelerating, poor gas mileage, fake stalling and stalling, eventually your engine will not start.

2. Oxygen sensors. Faulty oxygen sensors can cause very similar symptoms as the MAF.

I hope this helps you.

Feb 11, 2011 | Dodge Stratus Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine and tcs light on car stalling and rpms


p0134 is oxygen sensor fault code
p0717 is turbine shaft speed sensor (no signal) fault code

May 27, 2010 | 2001 Hyundai XG300

1 Answer

P1131 manufacturer control fuel air metering. What is the part? The car is Mazda 626 carburator 1997.


Hi Galant5Rov,

Firstly, congratulations to you on identifying the Trouble Code. This code relates to the Heated Oxygen Sensor (H02s)

The oxygen sensors supply the computer with a signal that indicates a rich or lean condition during engine operation (i.e. fuel/air metering).

This input information assists the computer in determining the proper air/fuel ratio. A low voltage signal from one or more sensors indicates too much oxygen in the exhaust (lean condition) and, conversely, a high voltage signal indicates too little oxygen in the exhaust (rich condition).

The oxygen sensors are threaded into the exhaust manifold and/or exhaust pipes on all vehicles.

A faulty oxygen sensor due to loose connections, bad grounds, high resistance in the circuit, or opens in the circuit can cause the following symptoms.
Related Symptoms
  • Surging at idle
  • Unstable idle
  • Running rough off idle
  • Hesitation
  • Stumble
  • Chuggle
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Spark knock
  • Stalling on acceleration
You must take EXTREME care when removing these sensors, as they can be difficult to remove (seize up). You may require a special tool to remove these without causing damage to the sensor.

Cheers,


"If this has helped you in any way, please rate this solution" :-)



Jan 27, 2010 | 1997 Mazda 626

3 Answers

1998 dodge avenger stalls while drivingand/or idle


Sounds like the electric fuel pump in the tank has a intermittent fault.

Apr 30, 2009 | 1998 Dodge Avenger

1 Answer

What are the symptoms of a faulty TP sensor and oxygen sensor?


if you tps is bad it should throw a default code, mostly stalling, bad emissions, poor fuel economy,
diagnostic might tell you isc motor.


hope 2 help shack

Apr 15, 2009 | 1999 Pontiac Grand Prix

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