Question about 1986 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

Car drove great one day but the next day it started overheating after driving about 5-7 minutes. Had the thermostat changed, the coolant reservoir and cap changed, coolant changed twice, hoses checked. Still overheated after driving 5-7 minutes. Different mechanic added a sealant to the coolant reservoir but still overheats. Heater does not blow hot air. Have put a lot of money into this car in the last six months so I need an answer that works. Please help!

Posted by on

  • edith527 Apr 15, 2009

    It's a 1996 Ford Taurus, not 1986. Mis-type I guess.

×

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 2 times.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 10 Answers

Ok, is it losing fluid? check the floor board by the passenger seat, up under the dash, is it wet? Your heater-core may be shot. The core is tucked up behind your glove compartment. If it's plugged, water won't circulate and won't be able to be cooled, causing it to overheat.

Posted on Apr 15, 2009

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Car overheating


You may have a blown engine head gasket. Check your oil to see if it is milky because water is getting into the oil, and check the water to see if oil is getting into the coolant.
If you have either of these, you may need to have a new head gasket for the engine, and hopefully you do not have a cracked engine head.
This will require a fair bit of work to fix correctly. Your local garage or mechanic may be your next call.
There are some products you can use in the coolant for either of these, but it is only a temporary fix.

Jan 31, 2014 | 2001 Mazda MPV

1 Answer

1994 vw golf 1.9 overheating


First question is what constitutes "overheating".
Since the car has been parked for years, the thermostat could be sticking closed.
The cooling system could have air pockets and need to be bled.
The water pump may be corroded inside and not pumping enough volume.
If the gauge goes above half way, the fans should start up. But half way should be more or less normal, not hot yet.
I would look at flow problems first, beginning with removing the thermostat and driving it without one for a few days. Also check and see if there is a process to bleed the cooling system of air.

Jun 24, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My car overheated yesterday. I pulled over and let it cool down. I opened the hood of my car and there was lot's of steam. It cooled down and I drove it home. I just started it to see what's wrong. I...


thats due to low or no coolant, you shouldnt drive this overheating engine damage will occur,the first thing is to fill the radiator up, and look around for any leaks, if no leaks are seen, then start engine and allow it to warm up, leave cap off at first to top off coolant, after a few minutes install cap and let it run, keep an eye on the temp gauge and also watch for leaks. this problem is due to a coolant leak,maybe a hose is bad or it was low on coolant or you have a bad thermostat, good day.

Apr 13, 2011 | 2003 Mitsubishi Outlander

1 Answer

I have an 1998 Subaru Forester - it has overheated three times in five days. The coolant is full and new, the thermostat was replaced today. The old thermostat spring was fully extended, after replacing...


Subarus can be challenging to "burp" Sometimes it takes several attempts to get the air out of the system. The procedure is simple. Top off the radiator, squeeze the hose a few times to help get the air out, replace the cap and start the car. let it idle or drive slowly near home with the heat on high. once the temp gauge begins to rise, if there is no heat get the car back to the driveway before the temp gauge gets half way. Shut the engine off wait for it to cool, at least 10 minutes. Then check the radiator again. If there is still air top off again and repeat. After 3 or 4 attempts if there is still air and or the coolant reservoir seems to be filling, try replacing the radiator cap. If this doesn't solve the problem, It may be a head gasket.

Feb 12, 2011 | 1998 Subaru Forester

1 Answer

I have a 2001 Jaguar S-Type V8. I drove my car on the highway for over an hour last night, with no problems. But when I was idle shortly there after, it began to over heat. Also when I do city driving...


A couple of possibilities. You should consider changing thermostat and coolant. Also fan belt that drives waterpump should be replaced, and lastly new radiator/coolant cap (they do loose ability to hold pressure)

Jan 02, 2011 | 2001 Jaguar S-Type

1 Answer

Mechanic went to change out the thermostat on the 03 Cruiser...drove it back to me..overheated when he got it back...removed the thermostat to see if that would at suppress the overheat problem until the...


Removal of the thermostat from the cooling system is not a good idea. This upsets the coolant flow rate in the system, and that can cause the engine to overheat, even when no other problem with the cooling system exists.

Try to identify the cause of the overheating.

Ensure that engine tune, or other engine mechanical fault condition is not the cause of the overheating, then go through the checklist following:-

1) Check engine cooling fan/s are operating as required when engine temp rises above cut-in threshold - check fan control relay is ok,
2) Check for collapsing radiator hose on suction side of water-pump when motor revs raised above idle.
3) Check coolant reservoir pressure cap is serviceable,
4) Check coolant system is properly filled - carry out any bleed off procedure specified to clear any air locks- (ensure heater core coolant flow is turned on).
5) Check for combustion gas bubbles in the coolant reservoir while the motor is running - this indicates a blown head gasket. If in doubt, take it to a radiator shop and ask for a combustion gas check on your radiator.
6) Check condition of radiator core:-
i) for blockage of air flow to (bugs/grass etc),
ii) for core internal blockage to coolant flow,

If all above ok, replace the thermostat again (also ensure it is not installed upside down) - faulty new thermostats are not unheard of.

Oct 20, 2009 | 2003 Chrysler PT Cruiser

3 Answers

2006 mini overheating


Check for leaks around the Coolant Overflow Reservoir (the yellow bottle in the middle of the firewall.) I had the same problem with over-heating, and replaced the thermostat with no help. I went to the dealer and picked up the Reservoir for $26~, installed it in 5 mins (at work) and haven't had a cooling issue since.

Jul 29, 2009 | 2006 Mini Cooper

2 Answers

Overheating problem


looks like you have done everything but the problem with your car is that the cylider head gasket has gone have a look at the dipstick or remove the oil filler cap if it looks like mayo then 100% head gasket has failed you said no water on the floor so it must have gone into engine only way this can happen is head gasket failing, if you have put lot of water in to the cooling system then your sump will be full of oil water mix.

let us know your findings so we can help you more if you need it

Apr 22, 2009 | 2002 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

1 Answer

Subaru Legacy 1998 Over heating


I had a similar problem. Check the temp of the upper and lower radiator hoses. If the upper one is really hot and the lower is not then there might be an air pocket in the radiator. Check the coolant to see if it is dirty or not. I changed the coolant and thermostat and drove only about 5 minutes before it overheated and the coolant became very dirty. My problem was the head gaskets. I also tried changing the radiatir cap. Hope this will help

Oct 04, 2008 | 1998 Subaru Legacy

3 Answers

Overheating


Going through the same thing with my 2000 2.7 l intrepid.

Thermostat, water pump, plugged radiator, blown head gasket? I tinker with autos, but on a very basic level.

My story and course of action (that you may be able to glean some ideas from)
I live in NW Indiana, and was on vacation on ease coast. Noticed water/antifreeze leaking from vehicle in a New Jersey Rest stop. Don't believe car was overheating at the time, but possible that I drove the car for up to a mile in this state.

Had vehicle towed to a local garage (Friday afternoon, so thought garage and not dealer was best option for geting back on the road asap).

Garage diagnosed water pump, and replaced it ($750 US). Said there was some antifreeze in oil, so engine flushed oil system, coolant, replaced oil filter, and refilled oil and coolant.

Car operated fine for 1 week of pretty hard driving (both local and highway driving, and then rather large hills in Maine). Then on way home, near Erie PA, car overheated on Toolway. Noticed overheating pretty quickly, within 1/2 mile.

Towed off of tollway, where refilled Coolant (added about a quart). Drove car around local town for 10 - 15 minutes, with no problems. No sweet smell from tailpipe (that would indicate possible head gasket leak), no antifreeze apparent on oil dipstick, and no visible coolant leak on or under engine, so drove on US 20 into Erie, going both 35 mph ;local, and 55 mph between-town driving. No problems. Stopped at place to eat in Erie, gave car a chance to cool down to check coolant levels. No leaks (external anyways) and coolant level where I left it.

Started again, and after approx. 3 - 4 miles of driving, car overheated (almost instantaneous going from normal temp to overheating (noticed it within a block). Overheated 1 block from Dodge dealer on Sun. afternoon. Let car cool down, ensured coolant full, and drove to hotel 2 miles away for night (no problems with overheating, but car may not have gotten back up to temp in those 2 miles- was approx 65 Deg Far ambient. Noticed that when the car does "act up" and heads for overheating, the vents blow cold, even though set for high heat.

Got to Dodge dealer the next morning. Dealer said no external leaks, and no mixing of oil and antifreeze (mixing could indicate blown head gasket). Diagnosed thermostat ($340 for parts and labor), and would be fixed in 3.5 hours. 8 hours later, dealer said finally had thermostat changed, but still overheating. Would try to reblead air out of the cooling system (air or air pockets in the system could cause overheating). Still no luck - car was overheating. So dealer said next thought would be partially plugged radiator. Plan- next morning, send radiator out for testing.

Well, radiator was sent out, and some gunk was found and cleaned from radiator
($225 US), but dealer said was not enough to be causing the problems I was getting. Next guess was to check the water pump, at $700 -$800 labor to see if it was defective. Dealer said, but I have not confirmed, that car would idle fine for unlimited time without overheating, but when took out for drive, it would overheat. The cooling fan was functioning properly.

Well, at that stage, decided to just tow car home, and fix there so I rented UHAUL truck and tow dolly ($350 US), plus the gas such a vehicle consumes.

Take to NW Indiana garage, and they say,

check water pump to see if defective ($650), replace water pump if defective, and if not defective, pull heads to inspect for blown head gasket (an additional $450 labor). Said exhause gases could be internally leaking into the coolant (because bad head gasket) and causing the car to overheat. Said may consider just putting in a used engine- may be cheaper. Well I know the previous owner, and the car was maticulously kept, so I say I need to think it over. Drove car home (about 2 miles) and coolant temp gage didn't budge an inch- coolant level was fine, so who knows what happened to it...

Checked from garage that replaced the water pump, and said it was a dealership new waterpump that was installed, with all new gaskets, and did NOT replace timing chain.

Go and talk to dad (aren't dad's great!). Dad has rebuild many motors in his day- was a millright who completly rebuilt from scratch Model A's , 1940's sedans, and some cars in the 1970s and 1980s. Successfully rebuilt 2 automatic transmissions in the 70s and 80s as well. Dad's getting up in age (mid seventies) so didn't want to burdeon him, just wanted his input. He said, consider water pump, but he seemed to remember a test you could do on the coolant to check for exhaust gases. After trips to 4 local Auto parts stores (some "fake" ones like Autozone, and a couple real ones), found a guy who knew of the test, and ordered one for me. So, for $40, hopefully will be able to see if there are exhaust gases in the coolant, indicating a blown head gasket.

Will have to make some decisions based on test results. Have about $1600 or so in car already. May try to do work myself- who knows!

Just trying to explain my overheating issues, and giving some insight into potential causes, and remedies that were explored in my case so they may be of help with you.

Sep 25, 2008 | 1997 Dodge Intrepid

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cars & Trucks Logo

318 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Ford Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76164 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22156 Answers

fordexpert

Level 3 Expert

5520 Answers

Are you a Ford Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...