Question about 1999 Chevrolet Suburban

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Water/coolant in oil.

I found water/coolant in my oil. No loss of power or stream/white smoke. Is this a head gasket problem or a radiator problem? I just don't want to take apart the engine if it is not the problem.

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It could be two different things. First it could be the start of a bad head gasket, its not blown yet but shes on her way out. Second it could be simply the air intake gaskets are weeping coolant into the lifter valley, then trickling down into the oil system. I'd check the obvious one first, the intake...hope that helped

Posted on Apr 13, 2009

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The engine is 4d33, now there is a heavy mixing of oil in the engine but no oil found in the radiator, when ur pouring water in the radiator it's not getting full whilst it is running


Blown Head Gasket Symptoms:
  • Coolant leaking externally from bellow the exhaust manifold.
  • White smoke from the exhaust pipe.
  • Overheating engine.
  • Bubbles in the radiator or coolant overflow tank.
  • White milky oil.
  • Significant loss of coolant with no visible leaks.

Apr 20, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

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91 Mitsubishi mighty max smoking an water comes out tail pipe why


If its white smoke, then you have a cracked head gasket. Check your radiator for loss of coolant and engine oil, pull the oil dipstick and see if the oil is whitish and if all the above check out you do have a cracked head.

Mar 02, 2015 | Mitsubishi Cars & Trucks

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My neon will not start replace heads and radiator frist


Signs of a Blown Head Gasket
Note: You can only truly confirm your suspicion by actually seeing the gasket, although precursor signs are usually evident.

Input from Answers.com contributors:

If you see coolant leaking from the water pump, I would pressure-test it and pinpoint the leak and fix that first; oil seepage isn't necessarily abnormal.
Typical symptoms of a blown head gasket may include these: bubbles of air coming up into your radiator (remove cap before starting); a leaking radiator; milkshake-colored oil; overheating; rough running; coolant or oil running from head; spark plug(s) that have a green tint (if green coolant); white-colored or sweet-smelling exhaust.
White smoke from your tail pipe, or loosing coolant through your overflow. Take the cap off and rev the engine: if you see bubbles, or if it comes out, you'll know.
A blown head gasket will leave a dark smell in the radiator. And you will have high back pressure coming though your radiator cap.
Take your car to a radiator shop to have a detector installed: If the blue liquid inside a "bulb" turns yellow, you have a leak.
Beware that if you drive for too long and it overheats, a blown engine will be your outcome.
A blown head gasket can go out in different areas causing different symptoms. Do a compression test to give you some idea. Don't confuse low compression for a bad head gasket, though. A bad valve can lower compression. And a bad ring.
There are lots of clues you can look for. When in doubt and you have tried everything, have the head checked out by a well-established machine shop first, to see if the head was the problem. This way you're not wasting your time replacing the gasket.
My car once had a blown head gasket. I had a great deal of coolant loss. The engine lacked power and ran poorly. It had white smoke coming out the tail pipe. And it overheated very quickly. Also, it had water in the oil.
A quick way to check: Look at your spark plugs; if coolant squirts out, you definitely have a blown head gasket!
Low compression does not necessarily mean a blown head gasket, but it is a good indicator if there is a sharp drop in compression on one or two cylinders, with no drop in the others. Sometimes a blown head gasket will cause a whistling or wheezing sound, but not always. It will not always cause water to enter the oil - or oil to enter the water - but they are signs to look for. Overheating will almost always occur, due to the exhaust entering the coolant. Check your overflow bottle for exhaust smells. Watch for bubbles or overflow of coolant from the radiator while running the engine. Check for muddy gray-looking oil or bubbles on the dipstick.
Often (but not always), a blown head gasket will also cause deposit of water on a piece of cardboard held an inch from the tailpipe output while the engine is running (when this is happening, it is likely that the catalytic converter has been ruined and the muffler will corrode in short order as well). Sometimes drops of water will be seen dropping from the end of the tailpipe.
Another clue: Turn on the heater; often when the head gasket is blown an odor of antifreeze and synthetic rubber will emanate from the heater vents.
Many of the symptoms of a blown head gasket can be caused by some other problem in the cooling system, without the head gasket being damaged. Conversely, other problems with the cooling system can cause a blown head gasket and/or warped head. For example, a corroding radiator can send chunks of rust through the cooling system which take out the thermostat and water pump. If the thermostat is old, sticking and corroding, it can send those chunks through the system and take out the water pump or cause a blockage in the radiator, etc.
Radiator leaks can be the primary cause, or a result, of failures in other cooling system components.
Don't keep driving with the car overheated, especially if your engine has an aluminum head; you are likely to warp it. If it is warped beyond a certain tolerance, it cannot be planed and will have to be replaced when the head gasket is replaced.
One of the most common tell-tale signs is a milky-gray ring around your oil cap. When coolant enters the engine oil through a crack in the head or through a blown gasket, it evaporates and leaves a milky ring around the oil cap. Another easy way to tell is to check your oil dipstick. Change your oil and pull out the dipstick. Make sure that you take note of how far up the dipstick the oil is. Top off your cooling system and fill your cooling reservoir to the top. Screw radiator cap back on and start engine. Run engine for about 20-30 minutes or until it reaches normal operating temperature. Allow engine to cool (engine must cool completely to get accurate oil reading). Check oil dipstick again. If the oil has a watery appearance and has risen noticeably up the dipstick, then you probably have a blown head gasket or a warped head. Also, look for a sweet-smelling liquid coming out of your tailpipe. Any of the above symptoms could be the result of a blown head gasket.
The easiest way to tell is with a compression meter. This replaces the spark plug and lets you know what compression each cylinder is running at. If your compression is abnormally low, then you have a blown head gasket or a warped head. (Note: check the repair manual for appropriate compression of each cylinder.)
This can be detected in a variety of ways: One way is to note whether that part of the engine block is leaking fluid. This is difficult to determine since there are many other parts of the engine nearby that can also leak fluids, especially when a vehicle is parked in one place for more than a few hours. One of the best indications of a blown, or nearly blown, head gasket in most automobiles is when the cooling system appears to be malfunctioning. The cooling system's efficiency and performance can be directly affected by the quality of the head gasket.
If your radiator is getting low on water often, this is a sign. The water could be discharged through the tailpipe on your automobile. Another sign is if your car motor has a miss in the engine. The water could be going in on top of the cylinders. This will foul the plugs and cause it to miss.
There are a few simple indicators you can check for with the engine cold and not running: 1) contaminated oil - it will have a milky appearance from the water mixing in the oil 2) oil on the top of the coolant inside the radiator (if your vehicle has a remote header tank you may not get this); 3) Have someone crank (remove the coil lead or disable the electronic ignition) the engine on the starter with the radiator cap or coolant jacket bleed hose/bolt removed. If the coolant pulses up and down or blows bubbles, you could be in trouble. If you find any of these symptoms move on to removing the spark plugs (label the plugs and the leads as you remove them, so you can put them back in the same place) and again crank the engine on the starter. Depending on how badly your head or gasket is gone, you may get coolant or oil coming out of the plug holes. Inspection of the plugs will also reveal problems during combustion: if you have rusty flaky deposits on the plugs, you may be burning off water; and if you have a heavy carbon, you are burning oil. If you have any of the first 3 items listed (water in oil, oil in water, or pulsing coolant - but don't get any result from checking the plugs) change the oil and water as appropriate, then warm up the engine without the radiator cap on (or the bleeder hose/bolt) and watch for bubbles as the engine warms up. Put the cap back on the cooling system and take the vehicle for a short drive, or run the engine till the entire system is up to temperature and then check the oil for contamination. Having these symptoms is not always indicative of a blown head gasket; usually if the gasket is gone, there is going to be some warping of the head and or block of the engine.
Loss of engine coolant with no external leaks, a continuous stream of bubbles can be seen with the radiator cap off, black gummy and sometimes crusty stuff around the radiator


Several common signs of a blown head gasket:

Blue/white smoke coming out the tail pipe which indicates oil is burning
Dripping oil from the gasket itself
Carbon Monoxide or hydrocarbons in the cooling reservoir
Excessive coolant loss with no obvious source of leakage
Loss of power or a rough engine due to compression loss
Water mixing with oil
Oil mixing with water
Low compression in 2 or more adjacent cylinders
Remove dipstick and let a drop of fluid fall on hot part of engine - oil will smoke water will "sizzle"

Jul 29, 2012 | 2004 Dodge Neon

1 Answer

Possibility of a cracked block. how can i be sure/


Vehicles: Any with the above symptoms

A cracked cylinder block will cause either:
(a) motor oil contamination of engine coolant
(b) coolant contamination of motor oil
(c) white exhaust smoke, due to coolant seeping into one or more cylinders.
(d) more than one of the above
(e) all of the above

Oil infiltrating into coolant is easy to see - drain some coolant out through the pepcock at the bottom of the radiator, and place it into a styrofoam coffee cup. Oil droplets floating on top of the green (or orange) coolant are easily seen. Or visualize oil by looking into the top of the radiator through the radiator cap.
Coolant infiltrating into and mixing with motor oil will permanently damage the engine (seizing it up through loss of lubrication), and must be prevented.
A leak from above the front suspension is, as physicians like to put it, "nonspecific", with the most likely cause a water pump seal or hose/hose connection.
A leak from near the fire wall will usually be a heater core hose, or hose connection.
A coolant leak on the same side of the engine as the water pump is a leaking water pump or water pump seal until proven otherwise.

To rule out everythng else, here's the 1999 Honda CR-V Troubleshooting Guide for Coolant Loss/Coolant Leaking:

Priority Action Part Type Cause
1 Inspect Water Pump - Worn, Cracked or Leaking Water Pump, or Water Pump gasket.
2 Inspect Head Gasket - Leaking Head Gasket.
3 Inspect Radiator - Leaking Radiator Hose(s).
4 Inspect Radiator Cap - Worn or Damaged Radiator Cap.
5 Inspect Radiator Hose - Ruptured, Cracked or Leaking Radiator Hose.
6 Inspect Freeze Plug - Leaking Freeze Plug(s).
7 Inspect Intake Manifold Gasket - Leaking, Worn, or Damaged Intake Manifold Gasket.
8 Inspect Water Outlet - Cracked, Leaking or Damaged Water Outlet.
9 Inspect Heater Control Valve - Leaking or Faulty Heater Control Valve.
10 Inspect Radiator Drain Pepcock - Loose, Damaged, or Faulty Radiator Drain Pepcock, or Pepcock O-ring.
11 Inspect Engine (DOMESTIC ONLY) - Cracked Cylinder Block Leaking Coolant into at least one Cylinder, causing white exhaust smoke.

Dec 03, 2011 | 1999 Honda CR-V

2 Answers

White Smoke from tailpipe, loss of power,


white smoke is water getting into engine maybe head gasket if it overheated

Feb 06, 2011 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

White smoke oily back window 1993explorer no oill loss on stick


head gasket gone ,no oil loss?? the water is going in the oil

Dec 24, 2009 | 1993 Ford Explorer Limited

2 Answers

My radiator is lose water everyday like a galon per day but i didnt find any liking. maybe the water is going inside the engine


check oil level if over full and looks like chocolate milk and exhaust for white smoke this could be a blown head gasket

Oct 29, 2009 | 2001 Dodge Caravan

6 Answers

White cloud of smoke through tailpipe


well I'd say that coolant is definitely leaking into the combustion chamber, albeit at a slow rate (for now). It could be anything from a blown head gasket to a cracked block or head. I'd get it to a shop as soon as possible and not drive it any more than need be until that point.

Oct 06, 2009 | 2000 Cadillac DeVille

2 Answers

My rx7 blows blue whight smoke


Hi Ross,

As a rule:
  • Black Smoke = Unburnt Fuel, incomplete combustion, bad mix
  • Blue Smoke = Burning Oil
  • White Smoke = Water Vapor, Water getting where it shouldn't be.
White smoke is common in cold weather when you first start your vehicle. It's from condensation. But it should stop as the engine warms up. If it doesn't, the moisture is from another source.

Questions:

  1. Are the smoke episodes accompanied by a loss of power?
  2. Was your coolant level low before you changed the coolant?
  3. Did it overheat? Badly?
I'm leaning toward a partial failure of the head gasket. Here is some info, things to look for and tests to confirm.

Symptoms:
  • Uncontained compression in one or more cylinders = lack of power
  • Coolant seeping into cylinders through the gasket breach creates white smoke
  • Oil seeping into cylinders creates blue smoke
Things to look for:
  • Coolant levels low. As the coolant is burned off, you'll notice the levels are lower
  • Oil in the coolant. If oil is present in the radiator, it's coming from the engine. Another indicator of a failed head gasket. Only a confirmation though, lack of oil does not rule out the possibility.
  • Water in the oil. Pull the oil dipstick. Is it milky and frothy, like it's been whipped? If so coolant is getting into the oil. Again, an indicator, not a confirmation of a blown head gasket.
  • Is the oil level dropping?
The quickest, easiest and (most importantly) cheapest confirmation of this is to run a compression test on each cylinder. I'm surprised your mechanic didn't suggest it.

The test should show high and fairly close compression (100psi or more) on all cylinders. If any of them are significantly lower, something is allowing the gasses to escape. Since piston ring failures would produce blue smoke, not white, that leaves the head gasket.

If you feel comfortable doing it yourself, testers are available at any auto parts store for under $30.00. If you don't, any shop can do it in under half an hour.

All this is to pin point the problem. Then you know what you are dealing with.

Comment me back with your findings.
Mike

Feb 03, 2009 | 1987 Mazda RX-7

2 Answers

97 Nisson pickup smoking white smoke (a lot)


this indicates that you have a blown head gasket. you may not have water in the oil pan but it's because the water is not leaking into your oil galleys,but instead leaking into the cylinders and being burned hence the white smoke.. there is a big myth that you will get water in the oil with a blown head gasket . there might be trace amounts but the only time you get water in the oil is if the heads crack or the block cracks othere wise most times it's just getting burnt in the cylinders,hence the great amount of white smoke. please rate this thanks.

Sep 28, 2008 | 1997 Nissan Pickup

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