Question about Peugeot 207

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Changing thermostat engine

On start up my display shows minus 5 when it is 20 degrees outside then as i drive it rectifies itself whats wrong cheers peugeot 207 1.4 2007

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See the diagram attached and fix it. God bless you
changing thermostat engine - a69398d2-3ee1-4cbc-a809-add4f036df2b.gif

Posted on Jul 27, 2013

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SOURCE: Frequency of cambelt change for a peugeot 306

Every 80000km or 4 years. 1km=0.625 mile

Posted on Sep 06, 2009

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SOURCE: Climate control display for Outside temperature

Had the same problem, replaced the ambient air temp sensor in front of the radiator. Cost is like 10-15 bucks. Don't worry if temp doesn't change right away. Took me about 5 miles and then it worked great.

Posted on Sep 18, 2009

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SOURCE: engine temperature peugeot 307 sw hdi 90 rapier

hallo
behind front grill (near engine coolant blower motor) you have two relays for engine blower motor and resistor. Or one of this relay is foulty (or wires in conector) (oxidation becouse of the wather), or the resistor is broken. yours engine have two speed (stage) fan and probably first does not work. you can check when engaging AC first stage should work instantly. second start in about 100°C

Marko

Posted on Sep 26, 2009

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SOURCE: Peugeot 206 GTi (Engine Squeeking Noise)

you must change the upper and lower fly-weel bolberings and check the belt tensity frome the point of limp or tense.

Posted on Sep 15, 2010

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SOURCE: ext temp is reading wrong external temps on dash

Sounds like the sensor is playing up, your local dealer should be able to assist.

Posted on Feb 14, 2011

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90 ranger. Will not start when temp outside reaches 85 degrees. Otherwise it is amazing. Changed fuel pump, starter, thermostat and something else. Sounds like not getting fuel.


Look at the "cold start sensor".
I have had problems with that on several cars in the last 10 years.
This part, about the size of your thumb, screws into the the engine block, and has a single wire attached to it.
It is identical in appearance to the engine temperature sensor that instructs the electric fan to turn on.
The difference is, this sensor is attached to the computer, and when it fails, it tells the computer wrong information causing hard starting. God bless your efforts.

Sep 04, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

Tip

Another Tip for saving fuel and sometimes correcting hard-starts and other...


Almost all vehicles nowadays are equipped with an engine coolant temperature sensor. They are in place to tell the vehicle's computer (PCM) what the temperature of the engine is at any time. In a lot of cases, it acts like an electronic carburetor choke.

For instance, when the temperature outside is 32 degrees F and the car has been sitting outside long enough to cool down to that temperature, the temp reflected from the coolant temp sensor SHOULD be telling the computer, "Its 32 degrees here inside the engine so dump extra fuel so it can start!" (Kind of like a closed choke on carbureted engines, only no moving parts except for the fuel injectors."

But what if that's not what the coolant temp sensor is reading? What if it thinks the temperature is 200 degrees F inside that 32 degree engine? In this case, it will report to the computer that the engine is already warmed up and minimal fuel will be required to start the vehicle. Hence, a hard or no-start!

A mis-calibrated (worn out) coolant temperature sensor can also cause a lot of driveability issues as well. For instance, if this had been the opposite scenario...The engine is actually 200 degrees F but the sensor thinks it's 32 degrees, this will cause the engine to run extremely rich, throw a light on the dash, and most likely stall out.

In my opinion, the coolant temperature sensor is arguably one of the most important sensors on your vehicle. If it's checked and/or changed regularly (I would change it about every 50,000 miles or so) this will be one of much forgotten steps in providing good fuel economy and good driveability...Not to mention good cold starts when the weather outside is frightful!

The good news about replacing this handy little guy? Two things. Inexpensive and easy to replace! The coolant temperature sensor can be purchased at most (if not all) auto parts stores (depending on your make and model regarding immediate availability.) For example, on a '98 Chrysler Sebring, Auto Zone has the sensors available for $25.99.

You can usually locate your coolant temperature sensor on or near the thermostat housing. (Again, vehicle make and model will vary in some cases regarding location.) It will usually have 2 wires leading to it. If you see a sensor with only one wire, you've found the coolant sending unit for your coolant gauge.

I hope this tip has helped you and I wish you another year of safe driving and good driveability!

-Jason_MKG :)

on Jan 11, 2010 | Chevrolet Blazer Cars & Trucks

Tip

Cold Starting Problems? Consider this before expensive dealership bills!


Almost all vehicles nowadays are equipped with an engine coolant temperature sensor. They are in place to tell the vehicle's computer (PCM) what the temperature of the engine is at any time. In a lot of cases, it acts like an electronic carburetor choke.

For instance, when the temperature outside is 32 degrees F and the car has been sitting outside long enough to cool down to that temperature, the temp reflected from the coolant temp sensor SHOULD be telling the computer, "Its 32 degrees here inside the engine so dump extra fuel so it can start!" (Kind of like a closed choke on carbureted engines, only no moving parts except for the fuel injectors."

But what if that's not what the coolant temp sensor is reading? What if it thinks the temperature is 200 degrees F inside that 32 degree engine? In this case, it will report to the computer that the engine is already warmed up and minimal fuel will be required to start the vehicle. Hence, a hard or no-start!

A mis-calibrated (worn out) coolant temperature sensor can also cause a lot of driveability issues as well. For instance, if this had been the opposite scenario...The engine is actually 200 degrees F but the sensor thinks it's 32 degrees, this will cause the engine to run extremely rich, throw a light on the dash, and most likely stall out.

In my opinion, the coolant temperature sensor is arguably one of the most important sensors on your vehicle. If it's checked and/or changed regularly (I would change it about every 50,000 miles or so) this will be one of much forgotten steps in providing good fuel economy and good driveability...Not to mention good cold starts when the weather outside is frightful!

The good news about replacing this handy little guy? Two things. Inexpensive and easy to replace! The coolant temperature sensor can be purchased at most (if not all) auto parts stores (depending on your make and model regarding immediate availability.) For example, on a '98 Chrysler Sebring, Auto Zone has the sensors available for $25.99.

You can usually locate your coolant temperature sensor on or near the thermostat housing. (Again, vehicle make and model will vary in some cases regarding location.) It will usually have 2 wires leading to it. If you see a sensor with only one wire, you've found the coolant sending unit for your coolant gauge.

I hope this tip has helped you and I wish you another year of safe driving and good driveability!

-Jason_MKG :)

on Jan 11, 2010 | Chrysler Sebring Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

AC recirculation is not working (outside temp is -37 degree centiigrade).


there is a damper that opens and closes to allow air to recirculate or come from outside. Find out where that is and check it out.

Dec 15, 2013 | 2011 Dodge Charger

1 Answer

Changing thermostat


go to www.automecanico.com translate this website with your browser and fix it.
God bless you

Jul 27, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Something telling computer it's minus 40 degree's outside


Have you checked the coolant temp sensor to see what the resistance is or to see if it is unplugged?

Dec 13, 2011 | 2001 Kia Sportage

2 Answers

04 x-type no heat, vehicle overheating, I changed thermostat, still no heat, and vehicle still overheating, I have no fluid,lose, fans are operating normally


I had the same problem with my daughters truck. Changed everything finally changed the radiator, that was it.

Nov 13, 2011 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My car every morning starts to overheat, while


Wrong thermostat. There are varying degrees of operating temperatures for thermostats. Example: 180 Degrees, 190 Degrees. The one you have isn't opening soon enough. If you replace it with a cooler grade thermostat, your problem should go away.

Hope that helps you understand what's going on. Thanks for using FixYa.

Apr 02, 2010 | 2005 Chevrolet Monte Carlo

1 Answer

The thermometer that reads the outside temperature


its not in the engine area, its nearer toward the bumber area, and replace the sensor

Mar 07, 2010 | Suzuki XL7 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

2002 toyota celica gts overheats


CHECK SOME BASIC PARTS, THE THERMOSTAT AND YOUR WATER PUMP, THE THERMOSTAT MAY BE THE WRONG DEGREES OR THE WATER PUMP IS GETTING A TIRED YOU JUST HAVE TO FIGUERE OUT WHICH ONE. IS THE PROBLEM...
CHEERS..

Oct 13, 2008 | 2002 Toyota Celica

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