Question about Land Rover Discovery

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Idle is going up and down

Im driving on freeway and about 55 miles starts almost chocking the idle starts going up an down.

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  • Land Rover Master
  • 12,223 Answers

Run the scanner /computer you can have some faulty devices:like PCM+BCM+ignition coil, etc. see the diagram attached.
God bless youidle is going up and down - 55ec258d-d63c-479f-ad31-f2b5d852a7d6.jpg

Posted on Jul 27, 2013

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6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

AutoDoc
  • 169 Answers

SOURCE: Runing high rpm while in idle

The concern happened after you relaced the plugs? You need to look for a vacuum leak that may have been created during the install.

Posted on Aug 24, 2008

gdmisp
  • 66 Answers

SOURCE: 2001 Dodge Durango 5.9L R/T.

Change the fuel filter. An put some injecter cleaner in it. With some good gas.Then hit thr highway an blow it out.Not to fast. lol

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • 6982 Answers

SOURCE: jeep chocks, stalls, rpms shoot up n down n dies

Check fuel pump for pressure and output. If it's not that, don't start guessing... have a scanner put on it and get some codes. While some codes can be ambiguous, it will serve to start you in the right direction!

Posted on Jan 18, 2009

  • 46 Answers

SOURCE: 93 accord. battery light

Yes it could be the alternator, or more specifically your voltage regulator which is part of your alternator. An auto elec should be able to test it

Posted on Jan 25, 2009

  • 51 Answers

SOURCE: Engine knock...

Oil pressure might actually be a bit high for idle. High or low oil pressure in an older engine tends to be indicative of some serious issues. Oil pressure that is too high tends to be a clue that you have serious carbon build up. That aside, have you tried running a higher octane fuel, or perhaps adding an octane booster to your normal grade? Pinging can become knocking in a badly worn engine. One recommendation: At your next oil change try substituting a quart of marvel mystery oil or lucas engine oil treatment in place of one quart of your normal oil. Both have some pretty good track records for helping to free up sticking valves and break up carbon in older engines. I'm an old timer myself, and I personally swear by Marvel for older engines. There is no "rebuild in a can" but Marvel comes close. Give those a shot, let me know what happens.

Posted on Feb 06, 2009

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I ask a question on what is the drive cycle to reset obd for toyota2005 rav4


Step One: How to Prepare Your Vehicle
  • Have the fuel tank between 30 and 70 percent full. Some systems, especially the EVAP system, need to have a specific level of fuel in order for the tests to be trusted. If the fuel tank is near empty or completely full, many of the basic tests will not run at all.
  • The vehicle must also have a good alternator and a strong battery. If you have to occasionally jump-start your vehicle, all of the memory from the powertrain control module (PCM) is erased, which includes the data that accurately tracks the results from various stages of the Drive Cycle. Also, if the battery is weak or undercharged, some of the most important tests will never run.
  • The vehicle must sit overnight, or for at least eight hours, in an environment that is less than 90° F. The engine temperature needs to match the air temperature in order to establish an accurate baseline for the testing. If the outside temperature is over 90° F, the fuel is too volatile and the EVAP system won't even try to run its tests, though some of the other emissions systems may run their tests.
  • The keys must be out of the ignition and all of the doors must be closed while the vehicle sits over night because many of the onboard computers "boot up" when the keys are in the ignition. Also, many of the onboard computers still run until all of the doors are closed after the vehicle is shut off and the keys are removed.
Step Two: The Cold Start
  • Start the vehicle and let it idle for two to three minutes in Park or Neutral. While it is idling, turn on the head lights, heater/defroster, and rear defroster for a three to five minute warm-up phase. Let the idle speed settle down to near the normal speed.
  • Next, put the vehicle in gear and drive through city streets at about 25 mph. Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times before slowing down to stop. Don't roll through the stop; be sure the car is really stopped, just like you learned in driving school. Accelerate from each stop in a normal fashion-not overly conservative, but not like you are competing in a drag race either.
Step Three: A Short Freeway Trip
  • After the vehicle has been cold started and driven for a few miles on city streets, the next step is to take it on a short freeway trip.
  • Enter the freeway on-ramp and allow enough room with respect to other vehicles so that you can do a 1/2 to 3/4 throttle acceleration up to freeway speed.
  • When you have accelerated up to around 60 mph and have safely merged into the flow of traffic, stay in the slow lane and maintain a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for a minimum of five miles. Please use the cruise control to help you maintain speed.
  • Find a nice, long off ramp to exit from the freeway. As you exit, take your foot off of the accelerator and let the vehicle coast down until it stops under its own power as you complete your exit from the freeway. Do not use the foot brake and do not shift gears until the very end of this "coast down" phase.
  • Step Four: More City Driving
    • After you have completed the freeway trip, drive through the city streets for a repeat of the second part of Step Two.
    • Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times and then maintain a city speed of 25 mph before slowing down to stop. Again, don't roll through the stop and make sure to accelerate normally.
    • Pull in to a parking place and let the engine idle for one to two minutes and then shut it off.
    Step Five: Have your Readiness Monitors Checked and Verified
    • Drive your vehicle to your regular shop and have them re-check your readiness monitors, present codes, and pending codes. They should do this as a courtesy and for free.
    • If all of your monitors are "ready" and there are no present or pending codes, then your vehicle has been properly repaired and is ready for an emissions inspection and for normal driving.

Feb 21, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to do the drive cycle of a 1996 Nissan pathfinder


How to Perform a Basic Drive Cycle


Step One: How to Prepare Your Vehicle

  • Have the fuel tank between 30 and 70 percent full. Some systems, especially the EVAP system, need to have a specific level of fuel in order for the tests to be trusted. If the fuel tank is near empty or completely full, many of the basic tests will not run at all.
  • The vehicle must also have a good alternator and a strong battery. If you have to occasionally jump-start your vehicle, all of the memory from the powertrain control module (PCM) is erased, which includes the data that accurately tracks the results from various stages of the Drive Cycle. Also, if the battery is weak or undercharged, some of the most important tests will never run.
  • The vehicle must sit overnight, or for at least eight hours, in an environment that is less than 90° F. The engine temperature needs to match the air temperature in order to establish an accurate baseline for the testing. If the outside temperature is over 90° F, the fuel is too volatile and the EVAP system won't even try to run its tests, though some of the other emissions systems may run their tests.
  • The keys must be out of the ignition and all of the doors must be closed while the vehicle sits over night because many of the onboard computers "boot up" when the keys are in the ignition. Also, many of the onboard computers still run until all of the doors are closed after the vehicle is shut off and the keys are removed.
Step Two: The Cold Start
  • Start the vehicle and let it idle for two to three minutes in Park or Neutral. While it is idling, turn on the head lights, heater/defroster, and rear defroster for a three to five minute warm-up phase. Let the idle speed settle down to near the normal speed.
  • Next, put the vehicle in gear and drive through city streets at about 25 mph. Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times before slowing down to stop. Don't roll through the stop; be sure the car is really stopped, just like you learned in driving school. Accelerate from each stop in a normal fashion-not overly conservative, but not like you are competing in a drag race either.
Step Three: A Short Freeway Trip
  • After the vehicle has been cold started and driven for a few miles on city streets, the next step is to take it on a short freeway trip.
  • Enter the freeway on-ramp and allow enough room with respect to other vehicles so that you can do a 1/2 to 3/4 throttle acceleration up to freeway speed.
  • When you have accelerated up to around 60 mph and have safely merged into the flow of traffic, stay in the slow lane and maintain a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for a minimum of five miles. Please use the cruise control to help you maintain speed.
  • Find a nice, long off ramp to exit from the freeway. As you exit, take your foot off of the accelerator and let the vehicle coast down until it stops under its own power as you complete your exit from the freeway. Do not use the foot brake and do not shift gears until the very end of this "coast down" phase.
Step Four: More City Driving
  • After you have completed the freeway trip, drive through the city streets for a repeat of the second part of Step Two.
  • Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times and then maintain a city speed of 25 mph before slowing down to stop. Again, don't roll through the stop and make sure to accelerate normally.
  • Pull in to a parking place and let the engine idle for one to two minutes and then shut it off.
Step Five: Wave your Readiness Monitors Checked and Verified
  • Drive your vehicle to your regular shop and have them re-check your readiness monitors, present codes, and pending codes. They should do this as a courtesy and for free.
  • If all of your monitors are "ready" and there are no present or pending codes, then your vehicle has been properly repaired and is ready for an emissions inspection and for normal driving.
  • If your monitors are not ready, please click here for more information.

May 26, 2016 | Nissan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to do the drive cycle on a 1996 nissan pathfinder


How to Perform a Basic Drive Cycle


Step One: How to Prepare Your Vehicle

  • Have the fuel tank between 30 and 70 percent full. Some systems, especially the EVAP system, need to have a specific level of fuel in order for the tests to be trusted. If the fuel tank is near empty or completely full, many of the basic tests will not run at all.
  • The vehicle must also have a good alternator and a strong battery. If you have to occasionally jump-start your vehicle, all of the memory from the powertrain control module (PCM) is erased, which includes the data that accurately tracks the results from various stages of the Drive Cycle. Also, if the battery is weak or undercharged, some of the most important tests will never run.
  • The vehicle must sit overnight, or for at least eight hours, in an environment that is less than 90° F. The engine temperature needs to match the air temperature in order to establish an accurate baseline for the testing. If the outside temperature is over 90° F, the fuel is too volatile and the EVAP system won't even try to run its tests, though some of the other emissions systems may run their tests.
  • The keys must be out of the ignition and all of the doors must be closed while the vehicle sits over night because many of the onboard computers "boot up" when the keys are in the ignition. Also, many of the onboard computers still run until all of the doors are closed after the vehicle is shut off and the keys are removed.
Step Two: The Cold Start
  • Start the vehicle and let it idle for two to three minutes in Park or Neutral. While it is idling, turn on the head lights, heater/defroster, and rear defroster for a three to five minute warm-up phase. Let the idle speed settle down to near the normal speed.
  • Next, put the vehicle in gear and drive through city streets at about 25 mph. Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times before slowing down to stop. Don't roll through the stop; be sure the car is really stopped, just like you learned in driving school. Accelerate from each stop in a normal fashion-not overly conservative, but not like you are competing in a drag race either.
Step Three: A Short Freeway Trip
  • After the vehicle has been cold started and driven for a few miles on city streets, the next step is to take it on a short freeway trip.
  • Enter the freeway on-ramp and allow enough room with respect to other vehicles so that you can do a 1/2 to 3/4 throttle acceleration up to freeway speed.
  • When you have accelerated up to around 60 mph and have safely merged into the flow of traffic, stay in the slow lane and maintain a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for a minimum of five miles. Please use the cruise control to help you maintain speed.
  • Find a nice, long off ramp to exit from the freeway. As you exit, take your foot off of the accelerator and let the vehicle coast down until it stops under its own power as you complete your exit from the freeway. Do not use the foot brake and do not shift gears until the very end of this "coast down" phase.
Step Four: More City Driving
  • After you have completed the freeway trip, drive through the city streets for a repeat of the second part of Step Two.
  • Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times and then maintain a city speed of 25 mph before slowing down to stop. Again, don't roll through the stop and make sure to accelerate normally.
  • Pull in to a parking place and let the engine idle for one to two minutes and then shut it off.
Step Five: Wave your Readiness Monitors Checked and Verified
  • Drive your vehicle to your regular shop and have them re-check your readiness monitors, present codes, and pending codes. They should do this as a courtesy and for free.
  • If all of your monitors are "ready" and there are no present or pending codes, then your vehicle has been properly repaired and is ready for an emissions inspection and for normal driving.
  • If your monitors are not ready, please click here for more information.

May 26, 2016 | Nissan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My jeep was idling pretty high and would come down go back up and cut off. I started it let it run for a little while went inside and it shut off. I got in drove it a bit if im going like 40 to 45 miles im...


Could be idle air sensor or throttle position sensor but first run the code check. On Jeeps you turn the key on and then off (without starting it) three times and leave in the on position on the fourth time. Code will appear on the monitor in front of the console. Write down the codes, the first one will be 12 if the battery has been unhooked before and the last one will be 55.

Jan 19, 2011 | 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Truck dies when i stop or slow down


Here is the most common cause of surges and stalls and low idle rough idle, it is the idle speed control air-bypass valve and throttle valve (IAC for short), they get full of gunk over the miles and cause idle issues (stalls, low idle) like yours, Get a can of intake cleaner from any local parts store, not carb spray, intake cleaner, it is made by a company called CRC, remove the air intake hose to the engine, hold the idle high so the engine won't stall, then spray the can of cleaner into the intake while keeping the engine running, use at least 1/2 the can, shut down the engine and disconnect the battery for 5 minutes, then restart and complete a number of mixed driving cycles, town, freeway, stop and go etc., after a few days the problem will go away as the system will relearn to the clean intake.

Feb 17, 2009 | 2003 Dodge Durango

1 Answer

Whenever my tahoe is idling or im going less than 15 mph it keeps trying to die


Here is the most common cause of surges and stalls and low idle, it is the idle speed control air-bypass valve and throttle valve (IAC for short), they get full of gunk over the miles and cause idle issues (stalls, low idle) like yours, Get a can of intake cleaner from any local parts store, not carb spray, intake cleaner, it is made by a company called CRC, remove the air intake hose to the engine, hold the idle high so the engine won't stall, then spray the can of cleaner into the intake while keeping the engine running, use at least 1/2 the can, shut down the engine and disconnect the battery for 5 minutes, then restart and complete a number of mixed driving cycles, town, freeway, stop and go etc., after a few days the problem will go away as the system will relearn to the clean intake.

Jan 14, 2009 | 2003 Chevrolet Tahoe

1 Answer

Dodge ram 1500 engine rpms surge at freeway speed


those sensors could cause the issue, clean the MAF 1st, also clean the idle system using the following procedure, the IAC can cause cruise surge. I use this to cure these problems all the time.

Here is the most common cause of surges and stalls and low idle, it is the idle speed control air-bypass valve (IAC) and throttle valve, they get full of gunk over the miles and cause idle issues (stalls, low idle) like yours, Get a can of intake cleaner from any local parts store, not carb spray, intake cleaner, it is made by a company called CRC, remove the air intake hose to the engine, hold the idle high so the engine won't stall, then spray the can of cleaner into the intake while keeping the engine running, use at least 1/2 the can, shut down the engine and disconnect the battery for 5 minutes, then restart and complete a number of mixed driving cycles, town, freeway, stop and go etc., after a few days the problem will go away as the system will relearn to the clean intake.

Jan 13, 2009 | 2001 Dodge Ram 2500 Truck

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