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Whats the best procedure for 95 Tacoma 3.4L camshaft seal replacement?

I'm doing a timing belt replacement on my 95.5 Toyota Tacoma and was told i should replace the can and crank seals. I've come across two ways but one is said to be wrong. The other of course is time consuming plus additional gaskets = $. Can the seals be replaced w/o removing the valve covers?

Posted by Anonymous on

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

leetamara
  • 702 Answers

SOURCE: 89 Dodge Raider 3.0 Labor hours to replace Valve cover Gaskets and seals

.5 for the 4 cyl. and its 3.6 for the 6 cyl. engine. This is according to the Chilton Labor Guide.

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

  • 383 Answers

SOURCE: TIming Belt 2000 VW Jetta GLS 1.8T

lrb2199: What this shop has suggested in terms of replacement is pretty much the norm.
1st, if the timing belt lets go or if it jumps time you are going to be hocking the kids to pay for the repairs.
You are looking at a Diesel engine which gets a little on the toasty side to begin with. The motor oil sometimes, depending on the selection may not be too kind on the oil seals.
When you are replacing the timing belt, there is not much more effort involved to remove the front crank and cam seals and replace them with new ones because you are right there! It's a matter of sliding a gear off or unbolting a gear to gain access to a seal.
As for the Water pump, Water pumps don't last for ever and will start to seep through what is referred to as the "WEEP" hole.
If the seal fails, antifreeze will leak onto the timing belt. Antifreeze is a very slippery substance and can potentially cause the engine to jump time. So, you have a water pump that is 9 years old and HOW MANY MILES ON IT? Personally, I would suggest putting another one on. Thermostats also have a limited service life. The part is not that expensive and with the repairs being what they are, often shops throw the labor in on replacing some parts such as thermostats if they are not a big deal. Main drive belts, again, it is a wear item, it could be well worn, possibly may have another 5,000 miles on it, but you have the opportunity to have a new one installed for just the cost of the part rather than pay labor 6 months down the road. The valve cover has to be removed to access the timing belt on some engines because of the way they are configured. Again, the part may not be that expensive, and the opportunity is there to do it while the timing belt is being replaced.
OR, the costs are nominal. Valve cover gaskets on the turbo diesel VW's do start to leak, so take advantage of the opportunity.
I can understand exactly where you are coming from because it is frightening sometimes to hear people tell their stories about what they had to pay for repair on their cars.
Brake shops as an example (NOT ALL OF THEM) seem to be notorious for selling expensive work which may not really need to be done. Example: I have been in business for 28 going on 29 years. I do not sell calipers, rotors, brake master cylinders and other costly items on the majority of the brake work which comes through my shop. WHY? Because they do not need those parts!
I had a customer who learned the hard way. We had given him a quote for brakes. In this case he did need rotors on his Mercedes.
WE use "ATE" rotors and "TEXTAR" pads which are original equipment parts. They cost a little bit more, but I don't have comebacks (complaints). The husband had to leave town and the wife thought we were too high so she called one of the national chains brake shops. They suckered her in at a price over a hundred dollars lower than mine. When she left their establishment her repair bill was a little over a thousand dollars more than my quote.
They sold her calipers, rotors, brake master, system flush, and a hot wax enema! I don't see how they can get away with things like that? I know for a FACT what that car needed because the car has been in here for regular service for over four years. His wife just thought she could save some money! I guess she did HUH?
Anyway, it sounds like your guy is on the up and up.
Got any more questions? I'll be happy to answer them.
Good Luck

Posted on Apr 21, 2009

terseo
  • 92 Answers

SOURCE: To change the oil pan gasket in a 93 Tercel

Stock the car doesn't come with an oil pan gasket but you can order one from rockauto.com you don't have to remove the A/C compressor for any of the jobs you listed. If you want to change the timing belt you need to remove the plastic rock guard under the motor on the passenger side. remove the spark plugs and using the socket turn the engine from the crankshaft clockwise until you are at TDC on #1 cyclinder. (compression stroke) Next remove the upper and lower plastic timing belt covers. The idler pulley is the one with the spring. Loosen the nut and remove the spring then you can remove the timing belt. It really isn't that hard to do. Maybe one afternoon.

Posted on Sep 20, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: oil leak in my 98 mazda protege

Could be a rear main seal.

Posted on Feb 01, 2010

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I have an 89 Toyota P/U 4cyl. w/air & power steering. I removed my harmonic balancer to repair/replace the front main seal. I replaced a new harmonic balancer and front main seal and a streaming o


Replacing the cam seal. You had to pull the timing belt. Because you had to remove the cam gear. This is where the problem is. Reset the timing and follow the manual to exact procedures. I recommend you replace all the timing components. Also, when you set the timing belt tensioner, Pry on it to get maximum tension. Before you put it together, turn the crank shaft two full turns (by hand/wrench/socket. Make sure it is on the marks. then reassemble.

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Is it bad to replace the cam and crank seals, while doing the timing belt, without removing the shafts i.e. cutting and prying them out)?


Haynes manuals get their information from factory service manuals, so I believe you could do as described in the Haynes book. Just be careful not to scratch up the seal surface on the shafts.

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Water pump 2000 3.0 liter dodge caravan


For The 3.0 Motor. (3.3 Way down the line.)

Drain cooling system.
Remove timing belt. Refer to Engine for procedure.
Remove water pump mounting bolts.
Separate pump from water inlet pipe and remove water pump.

Timing Belt Removal
Raise vehicle and remove accessory drive belt splash shield (Fig. 66).
Remove accessory drive belts.
Remove crankshaft pulley and damper (Fig. 68).
Support engine and remove right side engine mount.
Remove engine support bracket (Fig. 67).
Remove timing belt covers (Fig. 67).
Mark belt running direction for installation (Fig. 69).
Loosen timing belt tensioner bolt (Fig. 71) and remove timing belt.
Remove crankshaft sprocket flange shield (Fig. 68). CAMSHAFT SPROCKETS To remove camshaft sprockets
Hold camshaft sprocket with Spanner Tool MB-990775. Loosen and remove bolt and washer (Fig. 70).
Remove camshaft sprocket from camshaft. To install camshaft sprockets:
Place camshaft sprocket on camshaft.
Install bolt and washer to camshaft. Using Spanner Tool MB-990775, hold camshaft sprocket and torque bolt to 95 Nm (70 ft. lbs.) (Fig. 70). TIMING BELT TENSIONER
Install timing belt tensioner and tensioner spring.
Hook spring upper end to water pump pin and lower end to tensioner bracket with hook out (Fig. 71).
Turn timing belt tensioner counterclockwise full travel in adjustment slot and tighten bolt to temporarily hold this position (Fig. 72).

INSTALLATION


Install timing belt on crankshaft sprocket and keep belt tight on tension side (Fig. 69). Install belt on the front (radiator side) camshaft sprocket. Install belt on the water pump pulley, rear camshaft sprocket and finally on the timing belt tensioner.
Rotate the front camshaft sprocket in opposite direction to take up belt slack. Check that all timing marks are aligned (Fig. 69).
Install crankshaft sprocket flange (Fig. 68).
Loosen tensioner bolt and allow spring to tension timing belt.
Turn crankshaft two full turns in clockwise direction. Turn smoothly and in clockwise direction ONLY.
Align the timing marks on the sprockets and tighten the timing belt tensioner locking bolt to 28 Nm (250 in. lbs.) torque.
Install timing belt covers.
Install engine support bracket.
Install right side engine mount.
Install crankshaft damper and pulleys (Fig. 68). Tighten damper center bolt to 135 Nm (100 ft. lbs.) .
Install accessory drive belts.
Install accessory drive belt splash shield (Fig. 66).

Be sure to also replace all the cam and crank seals why you are there. Might as well put a belt on too.

FOR THE 3.3 OR 3.8 MOTORS.

Drain Cooling System.
Remove accessory drive belt.
Remove right front lower fender shield.
Remove water pump pulley bolts and remove pulley.
Remove water pump mounting screws. Remove water pump.
Remove and discard O-ring seal.
Clean O-ring groove and O-ring surfaces on pump and chain case cover. Take care not to scratch or gouge sealing surface

Installation

Install new O-ring into groove.
Install water pump to chain case cover. Tighten screws to 12 Nm (105 inch lbs.) .
Rotate pump by hand to check for freedom of movement.
Position pulley on pump. Install screws and tighten to 30 Nm (250 inch lbs.) .
Install accessory drive belt.
Install right front lower fender shield.
Refill Cooling System.

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Disconnect negative cable from battery.
Raise vehicle on a hoist. Remove right inner splash shield.
Remove accessory drive belts.
Drain cooling system.
Support engine from the bottom and remove right engine mount.
Remove right engine mount bracket.
Remove timing belt. Refer to Engine for procedure.
Remove timing belt idler pulley.
Hold camshaft sprocket with Special tool C-4687 and adaptor C-4687-1 while removing bolt. Remove both cam sprockets.
Remove rear timing belt cover.

Install new O-ring gasket in water pump body O-ring groove. CAUTION: Make sure O-ring is properly seated in water pump groove before tightening screws. An improperly located O-ring may cause damage to the O-ring and cause a coolant leak.
Assemble pump body to block and tighten screws to 12 Nm (105 inch lbs.) . Pressurize cooling system to 15 psi with pressure tester and check water pump shaft seal and O-ring for leaks.
Rotate pump by hand to check for freedom of movement.
Install rear timing belt cover.
Install camshaft sprockets and torque bolts to 101 Nm (75 ft. lbs.) .
Install timing belt idler pulley and torque mounting bolt to 61 Nm (45 ft. lbs.) .
Install timing belt. Refer to Engine for procedure.
Install right engine mount bracket and engine mount. Refer to Engine for procedure.
Fill cooling system.
Install accessory drive belts.
Lower vehicle and connect battery cable.

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If you haven't had the timing belt replace (60,000 miles is the suggested service intervale) this is an overlap of having the timing belt replaced.
If the timing belt is not due for replacement and its the cam shaft seal that is leaking. Its a pretty easy fix. Remove the top timing belt cover , and the crankshaft sensor wiring you may have to remove the front engine mount . Set #1 piston at TDC, Loosen tensioner w/ spring slip off belt. **Remove sprocket pull out old seal with a sharp pick. Greese and install new seal make sure its flush with its bore . Reistall sprocket. Slide belt over Cam sprocket tighten tensioner. Install cover and mount (if applicable) Check timing marks by turning crank two revolutions.
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You will see the groves on the Camshaft where you can place a wrench to hold the shaft.
After you replaced the seal replace the valve cover gasket ONLY IF YOU HAD TO REMOVE THE COVER TO HOLD THE CAM WHILE REMOVING ITS BOLT.

This is about as major as it gets.

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When/what should should timing belt be replaced


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