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'89 Camaro EGR valve

'89 Camaro egr valve temperature sencor. GM part # 14087416 or one that will work. What if we block the egr valve off?

Posted by Anonymous on

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I got the code p0400 1.

first take the egr valve off then get some carb cleaner spray it into the egr valve ports let sit 30-60min then take a small flat head clean any carbon left over in it. then check the vaccume lines to it they to might be plugged you can take a small wire or push pin and stick it in the ports to unplug it.

Posted on Sep 06, 2008

STEVIE_N_24
  • 147 Answers

SOURCE: How do you clean the EGR valve on a 99' Honda Civic?

Pull vacuum on egr valve with engine idling and see if engine stumbles and tries to die until vacuum is released. If this DOES NOT happen the egr exhaust passage is plugged will need to remove egr valve assembly and remove carbon from passage into cylinder head.

Posted on Mar 29, 2009

  • 105 Answers

SOURCE: eobd code 4010 insufficient flow to egr valve on 2001 ford maveri

dpbeffe sensors on fords are a common problem I had the same issue with several fords of same year new sensor from ford only cost me 38$ from ford just make sure both tubes to dpfe are clear though any blockage screws up the reading from the sensor

Posted on May 20, 2009

matney68
  • 426 Answers

SOURCE: my 3.4 camaro has an extremely rough idle sputters

I know you are saying it is an egr code being set but I believe it is very possible map sensor can cause this sort of issue or if it is possible can you disconnect the exhaust long enough to run it for a 5 minutes? Catylitic converter beginning to have issues. just a couple tips.

Posted on Oct 24, 2009

kel1guy2002
  • 3740 Answers

SOURCE: How to clean EGR valve passages in 1993 Isuzu Trooper DOHC V6

You have to the EGR valve (sometimes the Intake manifold to EGR Vlalve line also). After you remove it take a drill bit the about 20 % smaller than the actual hole of the outlet side and rotate the drill bit with your hand to dig out the carbon. Aditionally the line coming from the intake manifold to the EGR valve will clog near the connection to the EGR valve. I use either a single piece of copper wire or the wire that you would use to tie ribar together to clean the line. When your done cleaning take a piece of vacuum line and connect it to the diaphram side and **** on it... then plug the line well with your thumb. Grasp the valve and blow thru it... Air should blow thru it freely. Remove your thumb from the vacuum line and try blowing again.. No air should pass thru the valve.
Then reinstall the valve and start the vehicle with the vacuum line disconnected (but blocked off) Use another piece of vacuum line connected to the diaphram again and **** on the line.. The vehicle should die or run really bad. If it does this then you cleaned it correctly.

Posted on Jan 20, 2010

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1 Answer

2003 Mercedes, check engine light code EGR


Hi there:EGR stands for Exhaust Gas Recirculation. It is part of the vehicle emmissions system, and is used to reduce combustion temperature and pressure to control Oxides of Nitrogen. There are generally three parts to the EGR system: the EGR valve, an actuator solenoid, and a differential pressure sensor (DPF). These things work together to deliver the correct amount of recirculation based on engine temperature, load, etc.


In fixing this code, it is quite common for people to just replace the EGR valve only to have the OBD code return. The EGR valve is not always the culprit.


  • Use a vacuum pump and pull the EGR valve open while monitoring engine RPM's & DPFE voltage. There should be a noticable difference in RPM's with the EGR open
  • Clean out the EGR valve and/or tubing to remove deposits
  • Check the voltage at the DPFE, compare to specified values (refer to a repair manual for your specific model)
  • Replace the DPFE sensor (with a good quality / OEM one)
  • Replace the EGR valve


Hope this helps.

Dec 20, 2012 | 2006 Suzuki Forenza

Tip

DFPE Differential Feedback Pressure Exhaust sensor


<p><b><span>1.7) <span> </span><u>DFPE - Differential Feedback Pressure Exhaust </u>(sensor)<u></u></span></b><br /> <p><b><u><span><span> </span></span></u></b><br /> <p><b><span>What is it?</span></b><span> This is an electrical device that measures the differential pressure between two ports on the pipe that supplies the exhaust gases to the EGR.</span><br /> <p><span> </span><br /> <p><b><span>Where is it located?</span></b><span><span> </span>The DFPE is located near to both the EGR and the exhaust feed-pipe to the EGR.<span> </span>THE DFPE makes two piped connections to the exhaust feed-pipe in front of the EGR valve</span><br /> <p><span> </span><br /> <p><b><span>How does it work?</span></b><span><span> </span>The two pipes on the exhaust feed-pipe are connected at two separate sites.<span> </span>When exhaust flows through the feed-pipe it creates a differential in pressure between the two ports and the DPFE detects this and responds by altering a voltage output to the ECU.<span> </span>The ECU is able to detect for how long and by how much the EGR is open by monitoring the DFPE output.<span> </span>Until the engine has warmed the DFPE signal should indicate no EGR activity as the ECU disables the EGR from opening when coolant (engine) temperature readings are low.<span> </span>The EGR is kept closed by either the ECU not sending voltage to the EGR actuator (in cases of direct motor/solenoid control of the EGR) or by not charging the <b>vacuum control solenoid valve</b> on the vacuum line to the EGR (in cases where vacuum is used to actuate the EGR). <span> </span></span><br /> <p><u><span><span> </span></span></u><br /> <p><b><u><span><span> </span></span></u></b><br /> <p><b><u><span>Symptoms of faulty DFPE</span></u></b><span> </span><br /> <p><span> </span><br /> <p><span>The DFPE may misread the differential pressure leading to the ECU opening or closing the EGR valve at the wrong time.<span> </span>The symptoms mimic very much the effects of a faulty <b>EGR</b> namely:-</span><br /> <p><span> </span><br /> <ul> <li><b><span>Erratic idling</span></b><span> - if DFPE signals 'no pressure' in error and ECU opens the EGR valve.</span></li> <li><b><span>Misfire ('pinking')</span></b><span> - if DFPE detects 'pressure' in error and ECU keeps EGR closed. </span></li> </ul> <p><span><span> </span></span><br /> <p><b><span>Note:</span></b><span><span> </span>Sometimes a DPFE fault can be misdiagnosed:<span> </span></span><br /> <p><span>1) If the <b>coolant temperature</b> sensor is at fault and sends an incorrect 'the engine is warm' signal then the ECU responds by opening the EGR valve prematurely causing the engine to stumble and stall.<span> </span>This pattern looks very much like a fault from the DPFE when in fact the DPFE might be working perfectly.</span><br /> <p><span>2) If the <b>vacuum control valve</b> fails to open when instructed.<span> </span>Apply 5 volts between the socket pins on the valve to check for valve opening.<span> </span></span><br /> <p><span> </span><br /> <p><b><span>How to Check?</span></b><span> Applying pressure to one or the other ports on the DPFE should result in a change in electrical output as detected by a volt meter.<span> </span>No change in voltage output indicates the DFPE is faulty.</span><br /> <p><span> </span><br /> <p><b><span>How to Fix?</span></b><span> Make sure the pipes to the DFPE are free of leaks and clear of carbon deposits.<span> </span>If the DFPE is itself faulty then it must be replaced.</span><br /> <p><span><br /></span><br /> <p><span><b>NEXT 1.8) PCV Positive Crankcase Vent valve</b></span><br />

on Jul 15, 2011 | Mercedes-Benz E-Class Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

P 1401 location


Codes don't have a certain location, a code means a problem has occurred in a system of the electronics of the cars fuel control or emission control system.
P1401 NISSAN - EGR Temperature SensorPossible causes- EGR Temperature Sensor harness is open or shorted
- EGR Temperature Sensor circuit poor electrical connection
- Faulty EGR Temperature Sensor
- Malfunction of EGR function, EGRC-BPT valve or EGRC-solenoid valve
- Blocked EGR passages When is the code detected?An excessively low voltage from the Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) temperature sensor is sent to Engine Control Module (ECM) even when engine coolant temperature is low, or an excessively high voltage from the EGR temperature sensor is sent to ECM even when engine coolant temperature is high.
P1401 NISSAN Description The Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) temperature sensor detects temperature changes in the EGR passage way. When the EGR valve opens, hot exhaust gases flow, and the temperature in the passage way changes. The EGR temperature sensor is a thermistor that modifies a voltage signal sent from the Engine Control Module (ECM). This modified signal then returns to the ECM as an input signal. As the temperature increases, EGR temperature sensor resistance decreases.
This sensor is not used to control the engine system. It is used only for the on board diagnosis

Oct 08, 2012 | 2000 Nissan Maxima

1 Answer

Po406 exhaust gas recircution


P0406 FORD - Exhaust Gas Recirculation Sensor 'A' Circuit High

Possible causes- EGR volume control solenoid valve harness is open or shorted
- EGR volume control solenoid valve circuit poor electrical connection
- EGR volume control solenoid valve
- EGR temperature sensor and circuit

Aug 28, 2012 | 2005 Ford Freestyle

2 Answers

P1401


Without all the technical detail -your EGR Valve is bad

May 30, 2012 | 2001 Lincoln Navigator

1 Answer

Had P 0401, replaced EGR valve light went off now its back on with same code what could it be?


EGR stands for Exhaust Gas Recirculation. It is part of the vehicle emmissions system, and is used to reduce combustion temperature and pressure to control Oxides of Nitrogen. There are generally three parts to the EGR system: the EGR valve, an actuator solenoid, and a differential pressure sensor EGR (DPFE). These things work together to deliver the correct amount of recirculation based on engine temperature, load, etc. The P0401 code means that OBD detected an insufficient amount of EGR.
Symptoms You may notice drivability problems such as pinging (a.k.a. pre-ignition knock) when the engine is under load or the vehicle is at higher speeds. There may also be other symptoms.
Causes A code P0401 most likely means one or more of the following has happened:
  • The DPFE (differential pressure feedback EGR) sensor is faulty and needs to be replaced
  • There is a blockage in the EGR (tube), most likely carbon buildup
  • The EGR valve is faulty
  • The EGR valve may not be opening due to a lack of vaccuum
Possible Solutions In fixing this code, it is quite common for people to just replace the EGR valve only to have the OBD code return. The EGR valve is not always the culprit.
  • Use a vacuum pump and pull the EGR valve open while monitoring engine RPM's & DPFE voltage. There should be a noticable difference in RPM's with the EGR open
  • Clean out the EGR valve and/or tubing to remove deposits
  • Check the voltage at the DPFE, compare to specified values (refer to a repair manual for your specific model)
  • Replace the DPFE sensor (with a good quality / OEM one)
  • Replace the EGR valve

Nov 26, 2011 | 2000 Chevrolet Malibu

1 Answer

I had a diagnostics test don't on my 1997 Chevy Lumina. It showed several problem 1) Blocked passage on EGR system, Failed EGR valve, EGR solenoid faulty, Failed EGR pressure sensor where applicable...


All that Failed EGR valve, EGR solenoid faulty, Failed EGR pressure sensor and failed EGR vposition sensor may be telling you that is the EGR valve is faulty and not that it is loaded up with carbon. But I know you don't want to hear that as that EGR cost more than a can of carb clean and I don't blame ya!

If yoy have a multi meter, check out easyautodiagnostics.com, go to the GM section for your motor, chose test EGR and there should be an explanation on how to run some test on your EGR before you buy a new one.

Sep 04, 2011 | 1997 Chevrolet Lumina

2 Answers

I replaced my egr valve on my 2001 chevy venture 1 1/2 yrs ago,


I found an answer that worked for me here. (I have a 2001 Chevy Venture.) http://www.fixya.com/cars/t4093012-code_p1404_dodge_ram_1500_meanIn case links are not allowed, here's the text:That code is the EGR. I'd start by checking for a bad connection on the EGR plug-in. Pull the connector off and inspect each individual terminal inside the plug and the connector pins inside the EGR valve.
I found this solution at another forum on this issue. It worked on my 2001 Grand Am:

"Many GM built cars have a tendency to have the 'Check Engine Soon' light come on as a result of DTC code P1404. P1404 is described as EGR valve pintle stuck open, which in most cases is a false alarm. I had this happen with my '01 Grand Am. A little bit surfing on internet reveals that GM has a solution for the problem, a re-flash for the car's computer.

A software re-flash as a fix kind of indicates that the vehicles with this problem were built with it but I don't think GM will be re-flashing cars outside warranty for free. They will want their $100 for it.

Some hands on people I found had purchased a new EGR valve and changed it but the problem remained.

Possible reason (very likely) for the false P1404 code is that the plastic piston of the EGR valve position instrument (LVDT?) wears over time and starts reading a different position at valve closed than what it was when the EGR valve was first installed.

When the car was built and the computer circuits energized for the first time the computer learned the EGR valve closed position signal from the valve position instrument that is built on top of the valve itself. Over time, when the instrument wears, a slightly different signal is sent to the computer and when it differs enough from the 'Valve Closed Signal', that the computer had learned, the trouble code P1404 is set and the 'Service Engine Soon' light comes on.

Replacing the EGR valve with a new one does not necessarily fix this problem because the 'Valve Closed Signal' between valves is slightly different and it is just pure luck if your new valve would give a 'Valve Closed Signal' close enough to your original valve's signal not to set the trouble code. This is why the new EGR valve 'Valve Closed Signal' must be re-learned by the computer.

So, what this all means is that if the P1404 is a false code meaning that the valve pintle is not stuck open, then new 'Valve Closed Signal' can be re-learned by the computer using the old valve.

For fixing this problem the tool you need to have is a simple OBD II code scanner that can be used to erase trouble codes. There are many scanners of different price range on the market. I purchased one from AutoZone for about $90.

A code scanner is a very handy tool to have and I recommend everybody who is just slightly hands on type of a person to get one. It will end up saving a lot of money over time.

The fix goes like this:

1. Disconnect the wire harness from the EGR valve.

2. Turn key ON and erase the trouble code(s) from the car's computer AND TURN KEY OFF IMMEDIATELY WHEN THE SCANNER SAYS CODES HAVE BEEN ERASED. DO NOT TURN KEY ON BEFORE YOU RE-CONNECT EGR WIRE HARNESS.

3. Re-connect EGR wire harness and your problem should be fixed.

Mar 27, 2009 | 2001 Chevrolet Venture

1 Answer

1995 mercury villager check engine code p1200 injector open


P0400 = EGR Flow
P0325 = knock sensor (Do not ever change a knock sensor, they don't affect anything and cost $600 to replace for absolutely no gain)
P1200 = I can't find this one. I think it's injector flow
report back on what you find.
Egr flow may be plugged egr passages or a bad solenoid.
--------------
1996 PCED OBDII-Villager SECTION 1B: Description and Operation
Exhaust Gas Recirculation System
Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) System Operation The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system (Figure 1 below) recirculates a portion of the exhaust gases into the intake manifold under average vehicle driving conditions to reduce combustion temperatures and exhaust gas NOx content. The amount of exhaust gas recirculated varies according to operating conditions and will be cut completely under:
  • Engine starting condition
  • Low engine coolant temperature condition
  • Excessively high engine coolant temperature condition
  • Engine idling condition
  • High engine speed condition
  • Mass air flow sensor failure
The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system on the Villager uses the exhaust gas recirculation/evaporative emission (EGR/EVAP) control solenoid valve to provide vacuum to both the EGR valve and the EVAP canister when commanded by the PCM. If the exhaust backpressure is sufficient to close the EGR backpressure transducer valve, vacuum is sent to the EGR valve and allows EGR gas to flow into the intake manifold. If the exhaust backpressure is not sufficient, the EGR backpressure transducer will remain open and allow vacuum from the EGR/EVAP control solenoid to vent to the atmosphere.
The EGR system monitor, for OBD II regulations, uses an EGR temperature sensor to monitor the EGR system. The EGR temperature sensor is a thermister located in the EGR passageway. When hot exhaust gas is recirculated into the engine, the temperature at the EGR passageway increases. This increase is sensed by the EGR temperature sensor and a signal is sent to the PCM to indicate EGR flow. If the EGR temperature sensor does not detect EGR flow when commanded by the PCM after two consecutive drive cycles, the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) will be illuminated and a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) will be stored. The MIL will be turned off after three consecutive drive cycles are completed with no malfunctions detected. The DTC will remain stored in the PCM memory until 80 drive cycles have been completed without the same malfunction detected in the system.
Figure 1: Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) System Diagram Item Number Description 1 — EGR/EVAP Control Solenoid 2 — Air Cleaner Housing 3 — Throttle Valve 4 — EGR Temperature Sensor 5 — EGR Valve 6 — EGR Backpressure Transducer 7 — EVAP Canister
Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Backpressure Transducer Valve The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) backpressure transducer valve is used to control EGR. The EGR valve is operated by ported vacuum, but the ported vacuum will normally be vented off at the EGR backpressure transducer valve. As rpm increases, exhaust pressure increases and pushes on the diaphragm in the EGR backpressure transducer valve and closes the vacuum vent.
Figure 2: EGR Backpressure Transducer Value
Item Number Description 1 — Throttle Valve 2 — Vacuum Port 3 9D475 EGR Valve 4 9F452 EGR Backpressure Transducer Valve 5 — EVAP Canister 6 — EGR/EVAP Control Solenoid 7 — Vent
EGR/EVAP Control Solenoid The exhaust gas recirculation/evaporative emission (EGR/EVAP) control solenoid (Figure 3) is controlled by the powertrain control module (PCM). The EGR/EVAP control solenoid controls vacuum to both the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve and to the evaporative (EVAP) emission canister. When the EGR/EVAP control solenoid is off (12 V signal from the PCM) vacuum is supplied to both the EGR valve and to the EVAP canister. When the EGR/EVAP control solenoid is on (ground supplied by PCM) vacuum is vented to the atmosphere keeping the EGR valve closed and no vacuum to the EVAP canister. The PCM will command the EGR/EVAP control solenoid on at:
  • Engine starting condition
  • Low engine coolant temperature condition
  • Excessively high engine coolant temperature condition
  • Engine idling condition
  • High engine speed condition
  • Mass air flow sensor failure
Figure 3: Exhaust Gas Recirculation/Evaporative Emission (EGR/EVAP) Control Solenoid
Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Temperature Sensor
The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) temperature sensor (Figure 4) is a thermister type sensor that monitors the temperature of the exhaust in the EGR passageway. As the EGR flow increases, the temperature increases. This process creates a change in the resistance of the sensor, which decreases as the temperature increases. The signal is sent to the powertrain control module (PCM) to indicate that the EGR system is working properly. If the EGR temperature sensor does not change resistance as the PCM expects on two consecutive drives, the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) will be illuminated and a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) will be stored.
Figure 4: EGR Temperature Sensor Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Valve
The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve (Figure 5) recirculates portions of the exhaust gas back into the intake manifold to reduce the amount of the NOx released during combustion and to reduce combustion temperature. The amount of exhaust gases that are released into the engine is proportional to the load on the engine.
Figure 5: EGR Valve

Mar 20, 2009 | 1995 Mercury Villager

1 Answer

Vacuum to the egr valve on my 89 chevy van with 3o5


Stuck closed. You can't free these up. Gotta buy a new one.

Feb 13, 2009 | 1989 Chevrolet G10

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