Question about 1999 Suzuki Grand Vitara

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Air leak in vacuum or evap system

Son was driving at highway speeds when suddenly sounded like air was rapidly escaping from a tire. He pulled over and tires were fine, but rapid sound of air escaping from drivers side of engine more or less in time with firing. Car will drive at slow speeds but will not accelerate to highway speeds. He is broke and I am 2000 miles away. Desperately need help.

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  • Contributor
  • 31 Answers

Best to see a mechanic. Check PVC value, Check hose connections

Posted on Jul 10, 2013

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6ya6ya
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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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linktriscuit
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SOURCE: squeaking sound

It a particular period of time when the temperature changes and gets colder. So during the hot summer weather the belt(s) expanded. And as the weather changed and got colder the belts more likely would have the tendency to slip. There's an adjusting screw to adjust the belt tension. Hope you fix it.

Posted on Nov 13, 2008

lebones337
  • 152 Answers

SOURCE: Losing Tire Pressure for left rear tire repeatedly

most likely there is a small hole or crack in the tire, and when you drive the rubber gets hot and losens up allowing the hot air inside that is expanding to escape. my recomendation is to replace the tire. better safe than sorry when it comes to tires. good luck to ya

Posted on Jan 01, 2009

  • 137 Answers

SOURCE: TRANSMISSION PULLS VERY VERY SLOW IN DRIVE AND ONLY WHEN I ACCELERATE HEAVILY. REVERSE WORKS FINE.

is this car still under warranty? if so take it back to the dealer and don't accept it as repaired till you drive it. sounds like the logic that controls the transmission is flipping out, sometimes they will tell you that it needs a reflash. what this amounts to is that the manufacturer put some not so great programming in the logic when they built the car but now they have a patch or fix that makes it work better but you have to pay them for their time to install the fix. ask them what they will charge you for the privilege and decide if it's worth it to you. there is a recorded technical service bulletin about harsh shifts for your car. well, actually there are two, the latest one a revision of the first. i would try to make this their problem, it really is. hope this helps.

Posted on May 28, 2009

  • 136 Answers

SOURCE: I have a 2005 Suzuki XL7 tire pressuer sensor that won't go out!

I hate tire pressure monitors, in this case it sounds like you have a bad one. if you take it to the dealer they will be able to tell you which one is bad.

MIKE

Posted on May 28, 2009

  • 102 Answers

SOURCE: I HAVE A SLIGHT PURRING SOUND FROM THE ENGINE...

This would be most likely the first noise of a wearing input shaft bearing. It will only get louder, and eventual failure of the bearing will probably mean catastrophic gearbox failure. It stops when you put your foot on the clutch because the gearbox stops spinning then, and it is quiet in 4th and 5th because there is no side loading (as there is in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd) on the failing bearing. It wouldn't matter what sort of car it was, the gearbox should be overhauled as soon as possible.

Posted on Sep 26, 2009

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2008 Ford Escape Limited- Air/Heat stopped working in all 4 speeds- Dad replaced resistor and it still does not work. Help!


replace the heater fuse/breaker and, the whole resistor set (each resistor controls a different speed on the heater fan: low,medium, high speed

Dec 03, 2013 | 2008 Ford Escape

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Why the sudden jerking?


Fuel filter clogged and or impurities in the fuel system.faulty or incorrectly gapped spark plugs.Fault in fuel electrical system.Defective spark plug wires. Faulty emission system components.Vacuum leaks at the throttle body intake manifold or vacuum hoses. I would first look at the fuel inline filters it sounds like this is the likely problem.

May 29, 2013 | 1995 Jeep Cherokee

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My 1995 subaru legacy lsi cuts out when I rev the engine around 1 rpm. Plus the check engine light is on. I took it to the dealership and they couldn't fix it, but they got a code from the check engine...


code p 0441 refers to evaporative emission (EVAP) system --incorrect flow detected ==== causes --- hose connection/s--- intake leak---EVAP canister purge valve replace the purge valve

May 21, 2017 | 1995 Subaru Legacy

2 Answers

Service engine Diagnosis Code PO455 Transmission revs up


Hi, the code indicates a fuel vapor leak or lack of purge flow in the EVAP control system. It means a large leak has been detected. The (EVAP) emission control system prevents the escape of fuel vapors from a vehicle's fuel system. Fuel vapors are routed by hoses to a charcoal canister for storage. Later, when the engine is running a purge control valve opens allowing intake vacuum to siphon the fuel vapors into the engine.

p0455 most likely means one or more of the following has happened:
  • A loose or improperly affixed gas cap
  • A non-conforming gas cap (i.e. not factory/original brand)
  • Other leak or damaged piece in EVAP system


With a p0455, the most common repair is to:

  • Remove and reinstall the gas cap, clear the codes, and drive for a day and see if the codes come back.
  • Otherwise, replace the gas cap, and/or
  • Inspect the EVAP system for cuts/holes in tubes/hoses (you may hear a vacuum noise or smell fuel), repair if necessary

Mar 05, 2011 | 1999 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

Ihave dodge caravan sport 2001 and ihave this code in my car-p0442 how i fixed ?


This indicates a fuel vapor leak in the EVAP control system. It means a very small leak has been detected. .The (EVAP) emission control system prevents the escape of fuel vapors from a vehicle's fuel system. Fuel vapors are routed by hoses to a charcoal canister for storage. Later, when the engine is running a purge control valve opens allowing intake vacuum to siphon the fuel vapors into the engine.

A code P0442 most likely means one or more of the following has happened:
  • A loose or improperly affixed gas cap
  • A non-conforming gas cap (i.e. not factory/original brand)
  • A small leak/hole in a fuel vapor hose/tube
  • Other small leak in EVAP system
  • Faulty vent o-ring seal

With a P0442, the most common repair is to:
  • Remove and reinstall the gas cap, clear the codes, and drive for a day and see if the codes come back.
  • Otherwise, replace the gas cap, or
  • Inspect the EVAP system for cuts/holes in tubes/hoses
Few places to check - rubber hose under air box (requires removing the air box) and hoses connecting to EVAP system under the van on the drivers side.

Jan 12, 2011 | 2001 Dodge Caravan

1 Answer

Check engine light is on and when checked it pulls a malfunction code (code P1494) leak detection switch or mechanical failure. Is it still under warranty under the emissions? It is a 2001 Jeep Grand...


First off, a model year 2001, its possible still covered under the 5 year/50,000 mile emissions warranty. That's federal law. So you should not have had to pay a penny for that repair since the Leak Detection Pump is an emission control device.

As is the Charcoal Canister. If that is bad there should be no charge for repair or replacement. I hope you saved the receipts because I think they owe you a bunch of money. If they give you an argument about it, call Chrysler and they will take care of it.

Now, are you ready to learn more about the Leak Detection Pump then you will ever need to know? Good! Here it is!

Leak Detection Pump (LDP) Operation And Diagnosis:
* P0442-Evap Leak Monitor 0.040" Leak Detected
* P0455-Evap Leak Monitor Large Leak Detected
* P0456-Evap Leak Monitor 0.020" Leak Detected
* P1486-Evap Leak Monitor Pinched Hose Found
* P1494-Leak Detection Pump SW Or Mechanical Fault
* P1495-Leak Detection Pump Solenoid Circuit

Introduction:
The evaporative emission system is designed to prevent the escape of fuel vapors from the fuel system. Leaks in the system, even small ones, can allow fuel vapors to escape into the atmosphere.

Government regulations (remember I said that?) require on-board testing to make sure that the evaporative (EVAP) system is functioning properly. The leak detection system tests for EVAP system leaks and blockage. It also performs self-diagnostics.

During self-diagnostics, the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) first checks the Leak Detection Pump (LDP) for electrical and mechanical faults. If the first checks pass, the PCM then uses the LDP to seal the vent valve and pump air into the system to pressurize it.

If a leak is present, the PCM will continue pumping the LDP to replace the air that leaks out. The PCM determines the size of the leak based on how fast/long it must pump the LDP as it tries to maintain pressure in the system.

EVAP Leak Detection System Components:
Service Port: Used with special tools like the Miller Evaporative Emissions Leak Detector (EELD) to test for leaks in the system.

EVAP Purge Solenoid: The PCM uses the EVAP purge solenoid to control purging of excess fuel vapors stored in the EVAP canister. It remains closed during leak testing to prevent loss of pressure.

EVAP Canister The EVAP canister stores fuel vapors from the fuel tank for purging. EVAP Purge Orifice: Limits purge volume.

EVAP System Air Filter: Provides air to the LDP for pressurizing the system. It filters out dirt while allowing a vent to atmosphere for the EVAP system.

Leak Detection Pump (LDP) Components:
The main purpose of the LDP is to pressurize the fuel system for leak checking. It closes the EVAP system vent to atmospheric pressure so the system can be pressurized for leak testing. The diaphragm is powered by engine vacuum. It pumps air into the EVAP system to develop a pressure of about 7.5' H20(1/4) psi. A reed switch in the LDP allows the PCM to monitor the position of the LDP diaphragm. The PCM uses the reed switch input to monitor how fast the LDP is pumping air into the EVAP system. This allows detection of leaks and blockage.

The LDP assembly consists of several parts. The solenoid is controlled by the PCM, and it connects the upper pump cavity to either engine vacuum or atmospheric pressure. A vent valve closes the EVAP system to atmosphere, sealing the system during leak testing. The pump section of the LDP consists of a diaphragm that moves up and down to bring air in through the air filter and inlet check valve, and pump it out through an outlet check valve into the EVAP system.

The diaphragm is pulled up by engine vacuum, and pushed down by spring pressure, as the LDP solenoid turns on and off. The LDP also has a magnetic reed switch to signal diaphragm position to the PCM. When the diaphragm is down, the switch is closed, which sends a 12 V (system voltage) signal to the PCM. When the diaphragm is up, the switch is open, and there is no voltage sent to the PCM. This allows the PCM to monitor LDP pumping action as it turns the LDP solenoid on and off.

LDP At Rest (Not Powered):
When the LDP is at rest (no electrical/vacuum) the diaphragm is allowed to drop down if the internal (EVAP system) pressure is not greater than the return spring. The LDP solenoid blocks the engine vacuum port and opens the atmospheric pressure port connected through the EVAP system air filter. The vent valve is held open by the diaphragm. This allows the canister to see atmospheric pressure.

Diaphragm Upward Movement:
When the PCM energizes the LDP solenoid, the solenoid blocks the atmospheric port leading through the EVAP air filter and at the same time opens the engine vacuum port to the pump cavity above the diaphragm. The diaphragm moves upward when vacuum above the diaphragm exceeds spring force. This upward movement closes the vent valve. It also causes low pressure below the diaphragm, unseating the inlet check valve and allowing air in from the EVAP air filter. When the diaphragm completes its upward movement, the LDP reed switch turns from closed to open.

Diaphragm Downward Movement:
based on reed switch input, the PCM de-energizes the LDP solenoid, causing it to block the vacuum port, and open the atmospheric port. This connects the upper pump cavity to atmosphere through the EVAP air filter. The spring is now able to push the diaphragm down. The downward movement of the diaphragm closes the inlet check valve and opens the outlet check valve pumping air into the evaporative system. The LDP reed switch turns from open to closed, allowing the PGM to monitor LDP pumping (diaphragm up/down) activity. During the pumping mode, the diaphragm will not move down far enough to open the vent valve.

The pumping cycle is repeated as the solenoid is turned on and off. When the evaporative system begins to pressurize, the pressure on the bottom of the diaphragm will begin to oppose the spring pressure, slowing the pumping action. The PCM watches the time from when the solenoid is de-energized, until the diaphragm drops down far enough for the reed switch to change from opened to closed. If the reed switch changes too quickly, a leak may be indicated. The longer it takes the reed switch to change state, the tighter the evaporative system is sealed. If the system pressurizes too quickly, a restriction somewhere in the EVAP system may be indicated.

Pumping Action:
During portions of this test, the PCM uses the reed switch to monitor diaphragm movement. The solenoid is only turned on by the PCM after the reed switch changes from open to closed, indicating that the diaphragm has moved down. At other times during the test, the PCM will rapidly cycle the LDP solenoid on and off to quickly pressurize the system. During rapid cycling, the diaphragm will not move enough to change the reed switch state. In the state of rapid cycling, the PCM will use a fixed time interval to cycle the solenoid.
The Charcoal Canister

EVAP/Purge Solenoid:
The duty cycle EVAP canister purge solenoid (DCP) regulates the rate of vapor flow from the EVAP canister to the intake manifold. The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) operates the solenoid.

During the cold start warm-up period and the hot start time delay, the PCM does not energize the solenoid. When de-energized, no vapors are purged. The PCM de-energizes the solenoid during open loop operation.

The engine enters closed loop operation after it reaches a specified temperature and the time delay ends. During closed loop operation, the PCM cycles (energizes and de-energizes) the solenoid 5 or 10 times per second , depending upon operating conditions. The PCM varies the vapor flow rate by changing solenoid pulse width. Pulse width is the amount of time that the solenoid is energized. The PCM adjusts solenoid pulse width based on engine operating condition.

Vapor Canister:
A maintenance free, EVAP canister is used on all vehicles. The EVAP canister is filled with granules of an activated carbon mixture. Fuel vapors entering the EVAP canister are absorbed by the charcoal granules.

Fuel tank pressure vents into the EVAP canister. Fuel vapors are temporarily held in the canister until they can be drawn into the intake manifold. The duty cycle EVAP canister purge solenoid allows the EVAP canister to be purged at predetermined times and at certain engine operating conditions.

Hope this helps.

Dec 14, 2010 | 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Code P1494


DTC P1494 - Leak Detection Pump Switch or Mechanical Fault

The causes are possibly an open or shorted switch sense circuit, a pump switch failure, or an open "fused ignition switch" output. First off, a model year 2001 is will still covered under the emissions warranty. That's federal law. So you should not have had to pay a penny for that repair since the Leak Detection Pump is an emission control device.

As is the Charcoal Canister. If that is bad there should be no charge for repair or replacement. I hope you saved the receipts because I think they owe you a bunch of money. If they give you an argument about it, call Chrysler and they will take care of it.

Now, are you ready to learn more about the Leak Detection Pump then you will ever need to know? Good! Here it is!

Leak Detection Pump (LDP) Operation And Diagnosis:

This article describes the theory of operation for the leak detection system. In addition, information is provided for each of the Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC's) as follows:

* P0442-Evap Leak Monitor 0.040" Leak Detected
* P0455-Evap Leak Monitor Large Leak Detected
* P0456-Evap Leak Monitor 0.020" Leak Detected
* P1486-Evap Leak Monitor Pinched Hose Found
* P1494-Leak Detection Pump SW Or Mechanical Fault
* P1495-Leak Detection Pump Solenoid Circuit

Introduction:
The evaporative emission system is designed to prevent the escape of fuel vapors from the fuel system. Leaks in the system, even small ones, can allow fuel vapors to escape into the atmosphere.

Government regulations (remember I said that?) require on-board testing to make sure that the evaporative (EVAP) system is functioning properly. The leak detection system tests for EVAP system leaks and blockage. It also performs self-diagnostics.

During self-diagnostics, the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) first checks the Leak Detection Pump (LDP) for electrical and mechanical faults. If the first checks pass, the PCM then uses the LDP to seal the vent valve and pump air into the system to pressurize it.

If a leak is present, the PCM will continue pumping the LDP to replace the air that leaks out. The PCM determines the size of the leak based on how fast/long it must pump the LDP as it tries to maintain pressure in the system.

EVAP Leak Detection System Components:
Service Port: Used with special tools like the Miller Evaporative Emissions Leak Detector (EELD) to test for leaks in the system.

EVAP Purge Solenoid: The PCM uses the EVAP purge solenoid to control purging of excess fuel vapors stored in the EVAP canister. It remains closed during leak testing to prevent loss of pressure.

EVAP Canister The EVAP canister stores fuel vapors from the fuel tank for purging. EVAP Purge Orifice: Limits purge volume.

EVAP System Air Filter: Provides air to the LDP for pressurizing the system. It filters out dirt while allowing a vent to atmosphere for the EVAP system.

Leak Detection Pump (LDP) Components:
The main purpose of the LDP is to pressurize the fuel system for leak checking. It closes the EVAP system vent to atmospheric pressure so the system can be pressurized for leak testing. The diaphragm is powered by engine vacuum. It pumps air into the EVAP system to develop a pressure of about 7.5' H20(1/4) psi. A reed switch in the LDP allows the PCM to monitor the position of the LDP diaphragm. The PCM uses the reed switch input to monitor how fast the LDP is pumping air into the EVAP system. This allows detection of leaks and blockage.

The LDP assembly consists of several parts. The solenoid is controlled by the PCM, and it connects the upper pump cavity to either engine vacuum or atmospheric pressure. A vent valve closes the EVAP system to atmosphere, sealing the system during leak testing. The pump section of the LDP consists of a diaphragm that moves up and down to bring air in through the air filter and inlet check valve, and pump it out through an outlet check valve into the EVAP system.

The diaphragm is pulled up by engine vacuum, and pushed down by spring pressure, as the LDP solenoid turns on and off. The LDP also has a magnetic reed switch to signal diaphragm position to the PCM. When the diaphragm is down, the switch is closed, which sends a 12 V (system voltage) signal to the PCM. When the diaphragm is up, the switch is open, and there is no voltage sent to the PCM. This allows the PCM to monitor LDP pumping action as it turns the LDP solenoid on and off.

LDP At Rest (Not Powered):
When the LDP is at rest (no electrical/vacuum) the diaphragm is allowed to drop down if the internal (EVAP system) pressure is not greater than the return spring. The LDP solenoid blocks the engine vacuum port and opens the atmospheric pressure port connected through the EVAP system air filter. The vent valve is held open by the diaphragm. This allows the canister to see atmospheric pressure.

Diaphragm Upward Movement:
When the PCM energizes the LDP solenoid, the solenoid blocks the atmospheric port leading through the EVAP air filter and at the same time opens the engine vacuum port to the pump cavity above the diaphragm. The diaphragm moves upward when vacuum above the diaphragm exceeds spring force. This upward movement closes the vent valve. It also causes low pressure below the diaphragm, unseating the inlet check valve and allowing air in from the EVAP air filter. When the diaphragm completes its upward movement, the LDP reed switch turns from closed to open.

Diaphragm Downward Movement:
based on reed switch input, the PCM de-energizes the LDP solenoid, causing it to block the vacuum port, and open the atmospheric port. This connects the upper pump cavity to atmosphere through the EVAP air filter. The spring is now able to push the diaphragm down. The downward movement of the diaphragm closes the inlet check valve and opens the outlet check valve pumping air into the evaporative system. The LDP reed switch turns from open to closed, allowing the PGM to monitor LDP pumping (diaphragm up/down) activity. During the pumping mode, the diaphragm will not move down far enough to open the vent valve.

The pumping cycle is repeated as the solenoid is turned on and off. When the evaporative system begins to pressurize, the pressure on the bottom of the diaphragm will begin to oppose the spring pressure, slowing the pumping action. The PCM watches the time from when the solenoid is de-energized, until the diaphragm drops down far enough for the reed switch to change from opened to closed. If the reed switch changes too quickly, a leak may be indicated. The longer it takes the reed switch to change state, the tighter the evaporative system is sealed. If the system pressurizes too quickly, a restriction somewhere in the EVAP system may be indicated.

Pumping Action:
During portions of this test, the PCM uses the reed switch to monitor diaphragm movement. The solenoid is only turned on by the PCM after the reed switch changes from open to closed, indicating that the diaphragm has moved down. At other times during the test, the PCM will rapidly cycle the LDP solenoid on and off to quickly pressurize the system. During rapid cycling, the diaphragm will not move enough to change the reed switch state. In the state of rapid cycling, the PCM will use a fixed time interval to cycle the solenoid.

The Charcoal Canister

EVAP/Purge Solenoid:
The duty cycle EVAP canister purge solenoid (DCP) regulates the rate of vapor flow from the EVAP canister to the intake manifold. The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) operates the solenoid.

During the cold start warm-up period and the hot start time delay, the PCM does not energize the solenoid. When de-energized, no vapors are purged. The PCM de-energizes the solenoid during open loop operation.

The engine enters closed loop operation after it reaches a specified temperature and the time delay ends. During closed loop operation, the PCM cycles (energizes and de-energizes) the solenoid 5 or 10 times per second , depending upon operating conditions. The PCM varies the vapor flow rate by changing solenoid pulse width. Pulse width is the amount of time that the solenoid is energized. The PCM adjusts solenoid pulse width based on engine operating condition.

Vapor Canister:
A maintenance free, EVAP canister is used on all vehicles. The EVAP canister is filled with granules of an activated carbon mixture. Fuel vapors entering the EVAP canister are absorbed by the charcoal granules.

Fuel tank pressure vents into the EVAP canister. Fuel vapors are temporarily held in the canister until they can be drawn into the intake manifold. The duty cycle EVAP canister purge solenoid allows the EVAP canister to be purged at predetermined times and at certain engine operating conditions.

Hope helps (remember rated and comment this).

Jun 17, 2010 | 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

How do i replace the natural vacuum leak detection pump on a 2005 dodge dakota?


Vehicles equipped with NGC engine control modules use an NVLD pump and system. Vehicles equipped with JTEC engine control modules use a leak detection pump. Refer to Leak Detection Pump (LDP) for additional information.
The Natural Vacuum Leak Detection (NVLD) system is the next generation evaporative leak detection system that will first be used on vehicles equipped with the Next Generation Controller (NGC). This new system replaces the leak detection pump as the method of evaporative system leak detection. This is to detect a leak equivalent to a 0.020 (0.5 mm) hole. This system has the capability to detect holes of this size very dependably.


Removal & Installation
  1. Raise and support vehicle.
  2. Remove left-rear tire.
  3. Remove plastic shield (4) in front of left-rear tire. Access to both the EVAP canister (1) and NVLD pump (6) is from the area in front of the removed tire.
  4. Disconnect electrical connector at NVLD pump.
  5. Remove vapor line at NVLD pump. Pry outward on tab (3) and rotate pump (6) clockwise about 70 for removal.
  6. Remove NVLD pump O-ring (5) from EVAP canister (1).
To Install:
  1. Install new NVLD pump O-ring (5) to EVAP canister (1).
  2. Position NVLD pump (6) into EVAP canister (1).
  3. Rotate pump (6) until tab aligns with notch in EVAP canister (1).
  4. Carefully install vapor/vacuum lines to NVLD pump.
    WARNING The vapor/vacuum lines and hoses must be firmly connected. Check the vapor/vacuum lines at the NVLD pump, filter and EVAP canister purge solenoid for damage or leaks. If a leak is present, a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) may be set.
  5. Connect electrical connector to pump.
  6. Install plastic shield in front of left-rear tire.
  7. Install left-rear tire.

    2e35911.jpg
    Fig.


    aa300e1.jpg
    Fig.

Have a nice day (remember rated this help).


Mar 05, 2010 | 2004 Dodge Dakota

1 Answer

4.3 Liter V-6 Idles rough when in gear, runs fine on highway.


Can you check fuel trims at idle and under load?
If fuel trim is high at low speed and load, look for a vacuum leak.
If fuel trim is high at high speed and loads, look for fuel volumn problem or restriction.
If fuel trim is high at all speeds and loads look for pcm input fault, maybe a maf sensor problem?
If fuel trim is negative low speed and load, look for fuel pressure regulator or injector leak. If fuel trim is negative at all speeds and loads check ect and iac.

If you have the spider fuel system, that system is noted for problems. key on engine off, 60--66 psi fuel pressure.

Mar 06, 2017 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

2 Answers

2000 GMC Jimmy Transmission Whine


Does it sound like a loud winding sound coming from the front right side? I have a 2001 Jimmy and the 4wd tries to engage when driving up steep hills and going at highway speeds. The actuator vacuum switch engaged when the transfer case vacuum switch sends the vacuumed air to the actuator. What is happening is their is either a leak in the vacuum lines, a faulty actuator switch, or a faulty transfer case vacuum switch. When the jimmy has enough air pulling in, the extra vacuum is trying to push the actuator switch in when it is not supposed to. It is a much cheaper fix than a transmission. GMC should have recalled the whole 4wd system on any of the S10's, the JImmy's, and Blazers.

Jul 30, 2008 | 2000 GMC Jimmy

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