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Speed sensor for the power steering assist

I have variable assist power steering in my car. I had to bypass speed sensor so get about half assist. Need this part.

Posted by Anonymous on

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Posted on Aug 29, 2008

Molson02536
  • 3854 Answers

SOURCE: power steering failure

Problems with electronic variable-assist systems include all of the same things that can go wrong with a conventional power steering system (leaks, center wear in the steering gears, pump & hose failures, etc.), plus problems with the control electronics including the vehicle speed sensor circuit, the solenoid valve and control module. Accurate diagnosis, therefore, is essential to minimize warranty returns. Most of these systems provide diagnostic fault codes that can be accessed with a voltmeter, test light or scan tool to pinpoint the nature of the fault (if the fault is electronic rather than mechanical or hydraulic).

If power to the solenoid or control valve actuator is lost, the valve keeps the bypass circuit closed so full power assist is provided under all driving conditions. The only indication of trouble, therefore, might be a loss of road feel and/or increased steering sensitivity at highway speeds.

It’s important to remember that variable-rate power steering only reduces the amount of pressure that reaches the steering gear at higher road speeds. The only way it could reduce power assist at low speed would be in the unlikely event the actuator or solenoid valve failed in the open position. This could cause a noticeable reduction or loss of power assist.

On GM’s Magnasteer racks, loss of current to the magnetic coils would cause a loss of power assist at low speed. Coil resistance can be checked with an ohmmeter, and should read about two ohms. An infinite (open) reading indicates a bad coil (requires replacing the rack since the coils are not serviceable). Checking for shorts between both sides of the coil assembly and rack housing is also recommended.

The system does have self-diagnostic capability, but there is only one fault code: C1241 (Magnasteer circuit malfunction). The code is set if the module detects an open or a short in the coil circuit. If this code is present, the Magnasteer system is disabled and will not vary the steering effort as vehicle speed changes. The C1241 body code can be read with a Tech 2 or equivalent scan tool. The Tech 2 tool can also be used to perform a Magnasteer function test. The test varies the current to the coil so you can check for a change in steering effort when turning the steering wheel.

Replacement racks for variable-assist power steering applications are available with or without an EVO control solenoid. As long as the original EVO control solenoid is working OK, it can be removed and installed on the replacement rack to save your customer a few bucks. There’s no need to replace the whole rack if only the EVO solenoid valve is defective.

On GM Magnasteer applications, the whole rack must be replaced if the rack or control unit is defective because the Magnasteer unit is part of the rack. Handle with care because the permanent magnets inside the Magnasteer valve assembly and connector are fragile and can be easily damaged.

Good luck and hope this helps you understand the Steering system on your STS to save you some money on what to look for and what to look out for if your going to have a auto shop repair it. Such as the Valve is replaceable and it may just be a bad wire connection.



Posted on May 22, 2009

  • 43 Answers

SOURCE: How do I tell if my Power Steering pump is Variable assist or not

I would take the bad hose off and also write down any model numbers off of the pump and take them to my local parts store. Also take along the entire serial number off of your car. They can probably use this info to tell you what type of pump you have and what part you need.

Posted on Nov 12, 2009

  • 458 Answers

SOURCE: Variable Speed Sensor on 99 taurus

I think you mean the Vehicle Speed Sensor(VSS).It is located on the transmission,somewhere on the portion of the housing that contains the differential and axles.Most speed sensors are a 2 wire unit,and often the wires are tightly twisted to reduce electromagnetic interference(this will probably help in identifying it)

Posted on Feb 24, 2012

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My 2006 Buick Lacrosse suddenly started pulling to the right and became very hard to steer. Then the "Charging System Failure" warning came on. What could this be?


Do you know if your vehicle has --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Power Steering System (w/o Electro-Hydraulic Steering) or
Variable Effort Steering System
The variable effort steering (VES) system or MAGNASTEER® varies the amount of effort required to steer the vehicle as vehicle speed changes. At low speeds, the system provides minimal steering effort for easy turning and parking maneuvers. Steering effort is increased at higher speeds to provide firmer steering for increased road feel and directional stability. The electronic brake control module (EBCM) controls a bi-directional magnetic rotary actuator located in the steering rack and pinion. The EBCM varies the steering assist by adjusting the current flow through the actuator to achieve a given level of effort to steer the vehicle. The VES system accomplishes this by adding or subtracting torque on the input shaft to the rack and pinion. The main component of the system is an electromagnetic actuator, which consists of a multiple-pole ring-style permanent magnet, a pole piece, and an electromagnetic coil assembly. The VES system uses the ABS wheel speed sensor inputs to determine vehicle speed. When the EBCM senses wheel speed, it commands a current to the VES actuator that is most appropriate for each speed. The EBCM commands current from negative two amps to positive three amps to the actuator, which is polarized. At low speeds, a negative current is commanded, which assists steering. At medium speeds no current is commanded and steering is assisted by hydraulics only. At high speeds, a positive current is commanded, which creates steering resistance. Ignition voltage and ground are provided through the EBCM. The EBCM has the ability to detect malfunctions in the actuator or the circuits to the actuator. Any malfunctions detected will cause the system to ramp to zero amps and steering will be assisted by hydraulics only and set a DTC.
Are there any other lights lit on the dash ? ABS ?
DTC C0450 Steering Assist Control Solenoid/Motor/Actuator Circuit could have a diagnostic trouble code !
The electronic brake control module (EBCM) commands current from 0-1 amp to the variable effort steering (VES) actuator, depending on vehicle speed. At low speeds, 1 amp of current is commanded to the actuator and the actuator valve is fully closed. A speed increases, less current is commanded to the actuator and the valve opens, allowing pressure to bleed off through a power steering fluid orifice. The EBCM monitors and compares the Commanded and Feedback Current parameters to detect malfunctions in the VES system.
Or you could have a bad steering rack !
Charging System/Generator Fault
Refer to Charging System Description and Operation in Engine Electrical
Alternator problem maybe !
The electrical power management (EPM) system is designed to monitor and control the charging system and send diagnostic messages to alert the driver of possible problems with the battery and generator. This EPM system primarily utilizes existing on-board computer capability to maximize the effectiveness of the generator, to manage the load, improve battery state-of-charge (SOC) and life, and minimize the system's impact on fuel economy. The EPM system performs 3 basic functions:
• It monitors the battery voltage and estimates the battery condition.
• It takes corrective actions by adjusting the regulated voltage.
• It performs diagnostics and driver notification.

Nov 27, 2016 | Buick Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I just put hub bearings on my 2005 grand Prix GTP and when I plug the sensor it says service variable effort steering what's wrong.


check the sensor on top of the steering rack ,their is a sensor that increases the idle when the steering is turned when the vehicle is stationary

Nov 10, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

What is wrong with this 2007 pontiac g/p no p/s at low rpms?


The power steering pump has nothing to do with it .
Variable Effort Steering System Description and Operation
The Variable Effort Steering (VES) system or MAGNASTEER?® Varies the amount of effort required to steer the vehicle as vehicle speed changes. At low speeds, the system provides minimal steering effort for easy turning and parking Maneuvers. Steering effort is increased at higher speeds to provide firmer steering (road feel) and directional stability. The Electronic Brake Control Module (EBCM) controls a bi-directional magnetic rotary actuator located in the steering rack and pinion. The EBCM varies the steering assist by adjusting the current flow through the actuator to achieve a given level of effort to steer the vehicle. The VES system accomplishes this by adding or subtracting torque on the input shaft to the rack and pinion. The main component of the system is an electromagnetic actuator, which consists of a multiple-pole ring-style permanent magnet, a pole piece, and an electromagnetic coil assembly. The VES system uses the ABS wheel speed sensor inputs to determine vehicle speed. When the EBCM senses wheel speed, it commands a current to the VES actuator that is most appropriate for each speed. The EBCM commands current from negative two amps to positive three amps to the actuator, which is polarized. At low speeds, a negative current is commanded, which assists steering. At medium speeds no current is commanded and steering is assisted by hydraulics only. At high speeds, a positive current is commanded, which creates steering resistance. Ignition voltage and ground are provided through the EBCM. The EBCM has the ability to detect malfunctions in the actuator or the circuits to the actuator. Any malfunctions detected will cause the system to ramp to zero amps and steering will be assisted by hydraulics only and setting a DTC.
Your best bet is take your vehicle to a GM dealer or a ASE certified repair shop that knows about this system .

Mar 14, 2016 | 2007 Pontiac Grand Prix

1 Answer

I have a 2000 gmc 2500 I recently replaced my power steering pump and have trouble turning at low speeds I replaced my steering geat today and still have the problem


See if you have "variable assist power steering" with a malfunction. A solenoid may be mounted on the steering rack, provides less PS at higher speeds, full power steering capability at slow speeds or when stopped. Your belt is tight for the pump?

Aug 31, 2013 | GMC Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2007 Pontiac Grand prix GT steering components diagram


Variable Effort Steering System Description and Operation
The Variable Effort Steering (VES) system or MAGNASTEER® Varies the amount of effort required to steer the vehicle as vehicle speed changes. At low speeds, the system provides minimal steering effort for easy turning and parking Maneuvers. Steering effort is increased at higher speeds to provide firmer steering (road feel) and directional stability. The Electronic Brake Control Module (EBCM) controls a bi-directional magnetic rotary actuator located in the steering rack and pinion. The EBCM varies the steering assist by adjusting the current flow through the actuator to achieve a given level of effort to steer the vehicle. The VES system accomplishes this by adding or subtracting torque on the input shaft to the rack and pinion. The main component of the system is an electromagnetic actuator, which consists of a multiple-pole ring-style permanent magnet, a pole piece, and an electromagnetic coil assembly. The VES system uses the ABS wheel speed sensor inputs to determine vehicle speed. When the EBCM senses wheel speed, it commands a current to the VES actuator that is most appropriate for each speed. The EBCM commands current from negative two amps to positive three amps to the actuator, which is polarized. At low speeds, a negative current is commanded, which assists steering. At medium speeds no current is commanded and steering is assisted by hydraulics only. At high speeds, a positive current is commanded, which creates steering resistance. Ignition voltage and ground are provided through the EBCM. The EBCM has the ability to detect malfunctions in the actuator or the circuits to the actuator. Any malfunctions detected will cause the system to ramp to zero amps and steering will be assisted by hydraulics only and setting a DTC.

The Magnasteer® system is a speed-dependent power steering system. The Magnasteer® system provides power assist at varying levels depending on need.
A bi-directional magnetic rotary actuator in the steering gear adjusts the amount of torque (driver effort) necessary to turn the steering wheel.
The Magnasteer® is controlled through the ABS module and varies the torque by adjusting the current flow through the actuator.
The amount of adjustment will be directly related to the vehicle speed. The controller receives speed-related input signals from the vehicle speed sensor.
For more information on Magnasteer® refer to Variable Effort Steering System Description and Operation

Is the vehicle driveable ? The steering wheel is connected to the wheels

DTC C0450 Steering Assist Control Solenoid/Motor/Actuator Circuit
Sounds like it's stuck on full assist .

Apr 25, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

My power steering goes out, when i turn car off, then back on again, it corrects itself, but then it keeps doing it again


Check your fluid level, and belts. If the pump is making noise it is probably weak and will need to be replaced.

Jul 16, 2011 | 1998 Lincoln Continental

1 Answer

The steering in my 98 Buick Century is hard to turn at low speeds. Is this a steering pump issue or the rack and pinion?


Your PS pump is fine.

This vehicle has:

Variable-assist power steering: A power steering system that uses valves and speed sensors to vary the amount of steering assist according to engine or road speed. At slow speeds more steering assist is delivered and steering the wheels is easier; necessary for parking, etc.. At higher speeds, steering assist is reduced and more steering effort is required to steer the car, giving the driver greater feel of the road. Also known as Speed-sensitive power steering.

Loss of current to the magnetic coils would cause a loss of power assist at low speed. Coil resistance can be checked with an ohmmeter, and should read about two ohms. An infinite (open) reading indicates a bad coil (requires replacing the rack since the coils are not serviceable). Checking for shorts between both sides of the coil assembly and rack housing is also recommended.

Best wishes

Jan 01, 2011 | 1998 Buick Century

2 Answers

Power steering failure


Problems with electronic variable-assist systems include all of the same things that can go wrong with a conventional power steering system (leaks, center wear in the steering gears, pump & hose failures, etc.), plus problems with the control electronics including the vehicle speed sensor circuit, the solenoid valve and control module. Accurate diagnosis, therefore, is essential to minimize warranty returns. Most of these systems provide diagnostic fault codes that can be accessed with a voltmeter, test light or scan tool to pinpoint the nature of the fault (if the fault is electronic rather than mechanical or hydraulic).

If power to the solenoid or control valve actuator is lost, the valve keeps the bypass circuit closed so full power assist is provided under all driving conditions. The only indication of trouble, therefore, might be a loss of road feel and/or increased steering sensitivity at highway speeds.

It’s important to remember that variable-rate power steering only reduces the amount of pressure that reaches the steering gear at higher road speeds. The only way it could reduce power assist at low speed would be in the unlikely event the actuator or solenoid valve failed in the open position. This could cause a noticeable reduction or loss of power assist.

On GM’s Magnasteer racks, loss of current to the magnetic coils would cause a loss of power assist at low speed. Coil resistance can be checked with an ohmmeter, and should read about two ohms. An infinite (open) reading indicates a bad coil (requires replacing the rack since the coils are not serviceable). Checking for shorts between both sides of the coil assembly and rack housing is also recommended.

The system does have self-diagnostic capability, but there is only one fault code: C1241 (Magnasteer circuit malfunction). The code is set if the module detects an open or a short in the coil circuit. If this code is present, the Magnasteer system is disabled and will not vary the steering effort as vehicle speed changes. The C1241 body code can be read with a Tech 2 or equivalent scan tool. The Tech 2 tool can also be used to perform a Magnasteer function test. The test varies the current to the coil so you can check for a change in steering effort when turning the steering wheel.

Replacement racks for variable-assist power steering applications are available with or without an EVO control solenoid. As long as the original EVO control solenoid is working OK, it can be removed and installed on the replacement rack to save your customer a few bucks. There’s no need to replace the whole rack if only the EVO solenoid valve is defective.

On GM Magnasteer applications, the whole rack must be replaced if the rack or control unit is defective because the Magnasteer unit is part of the rack. Handle with care because the permanent magnets inside the Magnasteer valve assembly and connector are fragile and can be easily damaged.

Good luck and hope this helps you understand the Steering system on your STS to save you some money on what to look for and what to look out for if your going to have a auto shop repair it. Such as the Valve is replaceable and it may just be a bad wire connection.



May 22, 2009 | 2002 Cadillac Sts

1 Answer

Speedometer quits, loss of power steering


first of all, the power steering pump doesn't stop working and then start working usually they are just bad. second of all it shouldn't take 3 hrs to change speed sensor, and last the vss could cause all symptoms, if the car has variable assist steering the speed sensor could effect this

Apr 28, 2009 | 1996 Mercury Sable

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