Question about 1999 Honda Civic

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Valve settings Cylinder head valve settings

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  • Honda Master
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- Pull the hand brake and put transmission in neutral.
- Remove spark plug cords.
- Remove the spark plugs.
- Remove the Tappet cover
- Lift up the left front wheel.
Cylinder number 1 is toward the pulleys and belts side.
- Rotate the crankshaft anticlockwise with socket and extension rod and bring the valve tappets (intake and exhaust) No. 4 cylinder on dancing position.
NOTE: THERE ARE OTHER WAYS ALSO TO ADJUST THE FOUR VALVES AT A TIME. BUT AS DIY FOLLOW THE FOLLOWING METHOD TO AVOID ANY CONFUSION.
- Adjust the valve clearance of number 1 cylinder.
Valve clearance:
Intake 0.18 - 0.22 (cold) Exhaust 0.25 - 0.28 (cold)
- Rotate the crankshaft anticlockwise to bring the valves of cylinder 2 on dancing position and adjust the valves of No. 3 cylinder.
- Similarly rotate the crankshaft to bring the valves of No. 1 cylinder on dancing position and adjust the valves of No. 4.
- Rotate the crankshaft anticlockwise to bring the valves of cylinder No. 3 on dancing position and adjust the valve clearance of No. 2 cylinder.

Posted on Dec 29, 2013

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I. Need. Help. With. Cam bolts. And head bolts


Part 1 of 3: Getting to the head bolts

Materials Needed
  • Eye protection
  • Gloves
  • Oil and coolant drain
  • Parts cleaner or brake cleaner
  • Shop rags
  • Socket set and ratchet1: Drain the oil and coolant. Put on your eye protection and gloves and drain the oilfrom the vehicle.
    Make sure the vehicle can not be started by removing the negative cable from the battery. Next the coolant will need to be drained so it does not leak when the head bolts are loosened.
    Step 2: Clean valve cover. Use some of the parts cleaner or brake cleaner to clean up the valve cover and as much of the cylinder head as is reasonable.Remove valve cover. If necessary, remove other components to make the valve covers accessible, and start removing the bolts from the valve cover.
    Once all bolts are removed carefully removed the valve cover from the cylinder head. If any valve cover gasket material remains, remove it at this time and clean any excess oil from the edges. Set the valve cover aside carefully as it will be reused with a new gasket once repairs are completed.

    Part 2 of 3: Pushrod engine head bolt removal

    Materials Needed
    • Head bolt socket (if needed)
    • Numbered cardboard
    • Rubber hammer
    • Socket set and ratchetStep 1: Rocker arm and rocker removal. A pushrod engine has long pushrods that protrude through the cylinder head and attach to the rocker rail.
      The rocket arm will need to be loosened first. Many manufactures have a specific sequence for removal of the rocker arm bolts. After the rocker arm is removed, the rockers will be unbolted.
      Set all rocker arms aside in the order they were removed as they should go back to the cylinder they were removed from.Step 2: Remove the pushrods. Remove the pushrods one at a time from the cylinder head.
      Put them into a numbered piece of cardboard as the pushrods will go back into the same slot they came from.Step 3: Loosen head bolts. Use the ratchet begin to break the cylinder head bolts loose.
      Each bolt will be loosened but not removed. Loosen all of the bolts before removing any of the the bolts all the way.
      Step 4: Remove the bolts. Place each bolt through a numbered hole in the cardboard in case the head bolts are different lengths so they can be installed back into the proper hole.
      The bolts may require a special socket depending on the manufacture.
      Step 5: Lift off the cylinder head. Once all bolts are removed, lift up on the cylinder headgently; the head should come free easilyIf the cylinder head sticks, lightly use a dead blow or rubber mallet to tap the cylinder head to be able to remove it. Set to the side in a safe area.
      • Warning: Cylinder head bolts have a specific sequence that is used when removing them. Consult the manufacturer's specifications for the proper removal sequence for the engine being worked on.

      Part 3 of 3: Overhead cam head bolt removal

      Material Needed
      • Socket set and ratchetStep 1: Remove the timing cover. The timing cover will need to be removed to gain access to the timing belt or chain.
        This is necessary because the cam shaft sits in the cylinder head and is attached to the crankshaft with either a timing belt or timing chain.
        Step 2: Time the engine to remove the belt. The engine will need to be timed to avoid damage when the timing belt is removed.
        Each engine is different and will have its own procedures to time. There should be marks on the camshaft and crankshaft that will be aligned to set the timing at top dead center (TDC)Step 3: Remove the timing belt. The timing belt tensioner will be removed or released to take the tension off the belt.
        Once the belt is loosened, it should be able to be slipped of the camshaft in the cylinder head.Step 4: Remove the head bolts. Every engine will have its own procedures for the order that the head bolts are removed or tightened.
        Loosen head bolts ¼ turn each in the order specified, which may require a special socket. Once all the bolts have been loosened they may be removed one at a time. The bolts must be organized or marked in case they are different lengths.
        Step 5: Remove the cylinder head. Once all the bolts are removed, the cylinder head may be removed from the engine. If it is stuck, tap lightly on the side of the head with a rubber hammer to loosen the cylinder head.
        • Warning: Most head bolts are torque-to-yield. These head bolts are single use only and once removed must be replaced. Torque-to-yield head bolts stretch when they are torqued to allow them to tighten properly and repeated application can cause the head bolt to break.
        Removing the head bolts can seem like a daunting process

Sep 29, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Cylinder head torque settings and valve clearance


Hi David:
May I suggest that you Google search the make and model of the engine.with the key words Cylinder head torque settings and valve clearance Odds are you'll find the answer.
Cheers

Feb 19, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I took out the cylinder head for reconditioning after the car overheated ,then resetting valve timing is my problem now?


Is number 1 on tdcc or tdci? It should be tdcc with both number one cylinder valves closed as they would be on number one tdcc. I have no idea why you would be rocking number 5 cylinder valves with number one on tdcc or otherwise. The valve and ignition timing needs to be set correct on number one tdcc and then all others will fall into their correct timing also.

Dec 10, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Please assist with Cylinder Head Torque and Valve Clearance Specs for Tata Indica 1.4 LXi


i need the head talk settings & valve clearance for tata indica lxi

Apr 20, 2013 | 2006 Tata Indica LXi

1 Answer

One cylinder is low in my 1998 Volvo s90 and the repair shops says the engine needs to be replaced. Is this true>


Not necessarily. I assume you mean that the compression on one cylinder is low? This is generally either the rings/cylinder, or valves. Sometimes a blown headgasket can drop compression, but will generally have other symptoms, ie., blown between one cylinder and another, blown between the cylinder and a cooling or oil passage, etc.

A GOOD shop will check more than compression, to determine where the exact problem is.

*A head gasket blown between 2 cylinders will have low compression on bothe affected cylinders.
*A head gasket blown into an oil or cooling passage will blow bubbles (gasses) into the affected area.
*To check the rings/cylinder, after running the first compression check, put a few ounces of oil into the cylinder through the spark plug hole. Re-run the compression check on that cylinder, and if the compression improves dramatically, you have bad rings on that cylinder.
*To check the valves, you need what is called a pressure differential guage. You place the affected cylinder at TDC (Top Dead Center) on the compression stroke. You then attach the guage, and apply a set amount of air pressure to the cylinder, usually about 100psi. One dial on the gauge reads input pressure (100psi), and the other reads how much the cylinder is actually holding. A drop of more than 10-15% generally indicates a bad valve in the head (as long as the prevoius checks came out OK). To determine which valve is bad, remove the intake ducting and listen for escaping air (Intake Valve) and listen at the tailpipe for the same (exhaust valve).

These are general procedures for tests so that you can see if your mechanic has actually performed them or not. If you want to run the tests yourself, I can give you more specific instructions.

Repairs:
Head Gasket - need to remove the head and check the head and block for cracks. Then replace the gasket and reinstall the head.
Bad Valve(s) - need to remove the head and have the bad valves reground or replaced by a machine shop and then reinstall the head.
Bad Rings/Cylinder - the engine will need to be removed and either machined and rebuilt or replaced.

Again, if you want any more specifics, please ask.

Hope this was helpful!

Sep 17, 2011 | 1998 Volvo S90

2 Answers

Valve cover gasket, how to replace?


Rocker Arm (Valve) Cover REMOVAL & INSTALLATION 2.3L 4-Cylinder Engines
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Label and remove the spark plug wires.
  3. Remove the attaching bolts for the valve cover.
  4. Remove the valve cover from the cylinder head. If necessary, lightly tap the valve cover with a soft hammer to aid in removal. To install:
  5. Thoroughly clean the valve cover and cylinder head gasket mating surfaces.
  6. Install the valve cover on the cylinder head using a new gasket.
  7. Tighten the valve cover bolts to 14 ft. lbs. (20 Nm) in a crisscross pattern.
  8. Install the spark plug wires.
  9. Connect the negative battery cable.
  10. Start the engine and check for leaks. Fig. 1: Valve cover and gasket assembly 90953g12.gif
2.8L 6-Cylinder Engine
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. The following steps are necessary if your car has A/C and if you are removing the passenger side valve cover, if you do not need to remove the passenger side valve cover, skip them.
    1. Remove the A/C compressor belt and the compressor from the mounting bracket located on the passenger side of the engine. Do not remove the lines from the compressor.
    2. Place the compressor with the lines attached on the passenger side front shock tower and secure.
    3. Remove the compressor bracket.
  3. Remove the air cleaner-to-throttle body hose.
  4. Label and remove all necessary electrical and vacuum connections.
  5. Remove the attaching bolts for the valve cover(s).
  6. Remove the valve cover(s) from the cylinder head(s). If necessary, lightly tap the valve cover with a soft hammer to aid in removal. To install:
  7. Thoroughly clean the valve cover(s) and cylinder head gasket mating surfaces.
  8. Install the valve cover(s) on the cylinder head(s) using new gaskets.
  9. Tighten the valve cover bolts to 11 ft. lbs. (15 Nm) in a crisscross pattern.
  10. Install all necessary electrical and vacuum connections.
  11. Install the air cleaner assembly.
  12. Install the A/C bracket (if removed).
  13. Install the A/C compressor and belt (if removed).
  14. Connect the negative battery cable.
  15. Start the engine and check for leaks.
2.3L and 2.4L 5-Cylinder, and 2.9L 6-Cylinder Engines The 2.3L and 2.4L 5-cylinder, and 2.9L 6-cylinder engines have a two-piece cylinder head, the upper half and the lower half. The upper half is basically the same as a valve cover, except that it incorporates the bearing caps for the camshafts into the underside.
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Remove the spark plug access cover.
  3. Label and remove the ignition coils and vent hoses or the distributor cap and wires if equipped.
  4. Check the cam alignment before removing the cylinder head.
  5. Remove the bolts attaching the upper cylinder head.
  6. Remove the upper cylinder head, lightly tap with a soft hammer if necessary. To install:
  7. Thoroughly clean the upper and lower cylinder head gasket mating surfaces.
  8. Apply liquid sealing compound to the upper cylinder head mating surface. WARNING
    Use a roller or your finger to spread sealant, do not use an excessive amount of sealant, or the oil passages could become clogged.
  9. Place the upper cylinder head onto the lower cylinder head.
  10. Check the cam alignment before tightening the cylinder head.
  11. Install Volvo tool number 5454 or equivalent to the upper cylinder head.
  12. Tighten the nut on the tools to seat the upper cylinder head.
  13. Tighten the upper cylinder head bolts, beginning from the center out to 13 ft. lbs. (17 Nm).
  14. Install the ignition coils and hoses or the distributor cap and wires.
  15. Install the spark plug access cover.
  16. Connect the negative battery cable.
  17. Start the vehicle and check for leaks. Fig. 2: Remove the clamp and detach the vent hose 90953p66.jpg
    Fig. 3: Remove the spark plug cover and the plug wires or ignition coils to access the retaining bolts 90953p80.jpg
    Fig. 4: Remove the retaining bolts 90953p72.jpg
    Fig. 5: A light tap with a soft-faced hammer is usually required to loosen the valve cover 90953p81.jpg
    Fig. 6: Carefully lift the upper cylinder head up and off the lower section. Note the integral camshaft bearing caps in the casting 90953p82.jpg
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Jan 29, 2011 | 1999 Volvo S70

1 Answer

Can you please give me the tappet settings for a Honda civic 2004 1.6 Vtec please.


Do you mean 1.7L? I do not see a 1.6L in the manual. Instructions from autozone.com are pasted below.

lash:

Intake, 0.007-0.009 in (0.18-0.22mm).

Exhaust, 0.009-0.011 in. (0.23-0.27mm)

Civic
1.7L Engine

NOTE Adjust valves only when the cylinder head temperature is less than 100 degrees F.

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Note the radio security code and the radio presets.
  3. Remove the ignition coil cover. Remove the ignition coils. Remove the throttle cable clamps and harness holder from the cylinder head cover.
  4. Remove the cylinder head cover retaining bolts. Remove the cylinder head cover from the engine.
  5. Remove the grommet from the upper cover and disconnect the camshaft position (CMO) sensor connector. Remove the upper cover.
  6. Set the number one piston at TDC. The UP mark on the camshaft pulley should be at the top, and the TDC marks on the pulley should line up with the top edge of the cylinder head.
  7. Using the proper gauge feeler gauge, adjust the valves on cylinder number one.
  8. Rotate the crankshaft 180 degrees counterclockwise. The UP mark on the camshaft pulley should be toward the exhaust side of the cylinder head.
  9. Using the proper gauge feeler gauge, adjust the valves on cylinder number three.
  10. Rotate the crankshaft 180 degrees counterclockwise and bring the number four piston to TDC.
  11. Using the proper gauge feeler gauge, adjust the valves on cylinder number four.
  12. Rotate the crankshaft 180 degrees counterclockwise. The UP mark on the camshaft pulley should be toward the intake side of the cylinder head.
  13. Using the proper gauge feeler gauge, adjust the valves on cylinder number two.
  14. Install the cylinder head cover.
  15. As required, reprogram the ECM/PCM engine idle characteristics. Be sure all electrical items are OFF.
  16. Start the engine. Hold the idle speed at 3000 RPM-s in park or neutral until the radiator fan comes on or the temperature reached 194 degrees.
  17. Let the engine idle for about five minutes with the throttle fully closed.
  18. If the radiator fan comes on during the five minutes, do not count this toward the five minute programming time.
  19. Set the clock.

Oct 04, 2010 | Honda Civic Cars & Trucks

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