Question about Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

A mechanic falsifying indications to justify big engine work...How can I tell?

I have a 383 Chevy Stroker V8 engine. I have 30k miles on it (Rebuilt). I brought it to a mechanic for a basic tune up. He rebuilt my 4 barral Street avenger Holly carb, did the spark plugs, Dist cap, rotor, timed it and changed the oil. He told me that it was done and running very well. When I went to get the cart started up but the idle kept falling off. The mechanic acted c ionfused as to the cause. He eventually said that the power valve in the carb needed to be bigger to accomodate my 150 amp altinater....put it in...still an idle problem...then tested MSD ignition box, said it was faulted, was replaced but car still with an idle problem...lastly did a leak down test , showed 4 bad cylinders, cylinder 3@ 40%,cylinder 2 @30%, cylinder4 @35% and cylinder 6 @ 20%. I had no idle problem when I gave the car in, just needed a tune up...was running a little rich..thats it. Now am told I need an engine overhaul....I changed the oil every 3k mil and only used Valvoline 10w-50 oil. I only put Chevron high test fuel in the car. Finally, I took the car back...It seems to run well, the idle is a little hight 1000rpm, used to be 750 rpm. There are no visable fumes or smoke from my exhaust, The car starts well, warms up in 7 minutes, no run on when shut down. Has great power..What do you think. I told this mechanic I wanted a second opinion. Cash is tight...should I get it checked. Is it possible that I was told a lie to get expensive uneeded work done? I would appreciate any imput....I love my 81 MonteCarlo Coupe...Thanks

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Top Expert:

    An expert who has finished #1 on the weekly Top 10 Fixya Experts Leaderboard.

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

  • Cars & Trucks Master
  • 44,515 Answers

I suggest a second opinion would be in order as everything he did for the tune up was not altogether necessary. I consider that as the car was running ok before I would not touch the carby other than to fine tune the idle mixture to emission requirements. Any problems with the distributor cap would have showed up as a miss and the rotor button would have to be really bad but again as it was running ok. My policy is don't touch what ain't broke.Power valves in carbys are there to give extra fuel when the vacuum falls off under acceleration and do nothing else. To accommodate a bigger alternator more adjustment on the idle mixture screw would be necessary at idle but as alternator barely charge at idle the adjustment would be little. The low compressions may be from pumped up hydraulic followers and I would discuss that with the original engine builder as to what hydraulic units he fitted. but again if it was running ok before what the hell. Yes get a second opinion for sure from the engine builder.

Posted on Apr 29, 2013

Ad

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of.(from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones)
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad
bunnydawg
  • 5158 Answers

SOURCE: low compression in #1and #2 cylinders 1993 eclipse gs 1.8l

burned valve is likely the culprit.... or bad rings.... hook air up to that cyclinder one at a time.... and listen where the air is escaping... be aware that the motor will rotate till the piston is at the bottom of it's rotation. if it's a burned valve you will have to remove the head and replace it but somewhat easier job then replacing the rings. darn almost forgot.... it can also be a blown head gasket.... same procedure but you might need a brush and some soap water to test for an air leak at the side of the head. when you are done spray some wd 40 on it to get the water off so the spark plugs do not arc.


Robert

Posted on Sep 26, 2008

txkjun
  • 409 Answers

SOURCE: Honda Misses.

Pin point the dead hole and check that injector.

Posted on Dec 24, 2008

blueextc3221
  • 15935 Answers

SOURCE: 1998 chevy pickup V8 130.000 miles running very

The Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve is an important part of the exhaust circulation system of a vehicle. EGR valves have been in use in the United States since the 1960s, when car companies were seeking ways to increase the efficiency of vehicles while also decreasing pollution. When the EGR valve is clogged or malfunctioning, it can cause irregularities in engine performance such as rough idling or valve knock, indicating that the EGR valve should be inspected.
The EGR valve works by routing a small amount of exhaust back into the combustion chamber, where it can be reused. This is done for a number of reasons. The primary reason is that a certain temperature is required in the combustion chamber, and exhaust is much warmer than air taken in from the outside. As a result, the engine need not work as hard to heat the combustion chamber to optimal temperature. The second reason is that the use of an EGR valve helps to reduce nitrogen oxides, which will combine with elements in the atmosphere to form smog.
Many EGR valves are mechanical, and simply have a small valve which opens to allow exhaust into the combustion chamber and closes when it is not necessary, and to keep the air mixture optimal for combustion. Some mechanical versions will not open until there is sufficient back pressure, ensuring that the valve will not be open when the engine is idle or warming up and needs a higher concentration of oxygen for combustion. Electronic EGR valves are also available, and use electronics to regulate the valve.
If the EGR valve is stuck open, it will essentially cause a vacuum leak, leading to inefficient combustion, rough idling, hesitation, and sometimes stalling in extreme cases. This is because the car cannot combust on carbon dioxide from the tailpipe alone-it needs atmospheric oxygen as well. If the combustion chamber is flooded with exhaust from an open EGR valve, it will not function properly. To check and see if the EGR valve is stuck open, have someone idle a parked vehicle with the brake on while you examine the plunger shaft to see if it is stuck open.
If the EGR valve is stuck closed, emissions of nitrogen oxides will rise, and the car may start to knock. Spark knock happens when the fuel mixture in the combustion chamber ignites before it has been reached by the explosion in the cylinder, resulting in a disruption of the engine timing. In this instance, the engine should be warmed up and revved to see if the EGR valve will move.
In both cases, simple repairs are possible. The EGR valve can be clogged, and a simple cleaning of a mechanical EGR valve may solve the problem. In the case of an electrically controlled EGR valve or a more complex mechanical problem, replacement of the valve may be needed. The EGR valve is an expensive motor vehicle component, and care should be taken to ensure that it needs to be replaced rather than repaired. A reputable mechanic should advise you appropriately.
Failure to repair or replace the EGR valve will not lead to a life threatening condition, although it will reduce the life of your car and increase the potential emissions. Especially in areas which require smog testing, an automobile with a malfunctioning EGR valve may not pass.


Thanks for using FixYa - a FixYa rating is appreciated for answering your FREE question.

Posted on Mar 26, 2009

  • 14036 Answers

SOURCE: 2001 Galant ES-V6 DTC is P0304 - Cylinder #4 misfire

look for weak valve springs.

Posted on Jun 22, 2009

iambanshee74
  • 3489 Answers

SOURCE: 2007 aveo misfire faults

gm has a problem with this from way back. double check your spark plugs and if they are not ac delcos, change them. ive seen this time and time again swearing, myself, that there is no way that the plugs would cause this issue. it always comes up with random misfire and usually another 1 or 2 codes misfire codes. put in ac delco, no more codes. let me know

Posted on Feb 22, 2010

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

I bought a Camaro with a 383 crate motor. it has HOLLY aluminum heads. The engine identification number on the block is VO327TMM. Can anyone tell me about this motor? I no its a crate motor, thats it.


No because I don't know what camshaft is in it or what intake modes/exhaust and so on. The block number means nothing as far as HP goes, it is what goes into the block and on it that matters.

Nov 30, 2016 | Chevrolet Camaro Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Ok its really a Chevy-----1998 suburban with 1 year old factory 383 stroker engine. Engine has great power. Noticed a rattle while coasting lately. Also a grinding noise under hard acceleration from a...


take the transmision cover plate off the bottom and check your flexplate for cracks or loose bolts between the flex plate and the torque converter..also chheck your motor mounts.. you may have a broken mount allowing the fan to rub on the shroud..

Mar 08, 2014 | GMC Sierra Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Dishonest Mechanic?


If you have a muscle car, it would be a good age. unless you have owned it from new, you don't know how it has been looked after before you got it. When you do a tune up it can highlight problems that you haven't noticed because the state of tune was hiding the problem. Also running expensive oil through an engine with an unknown history can create problems rather than prevent them. The stroker engine is a fairly high revving motor and as such is open to abuse. And the fact it is a muscle car will mean it will have been used as such. I would suggest you buy a second motor and recondition that while running the one in your car. As long as you can live with the motor you have got. You could take your time and do the work yourself. I don't think the mechanic was trying to rip you off. He just found problems that were already there, but hidden.

Apr 29, 2013 | Chevrolet Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 1995 K2500 that had the motor changed to a HD 383 Stroker before I bought it / It also has vortec heads. The oil pressure seems really low to me. About 2 to 5 lbs at idle. About 30 to 35 lb


That will burn out the engines bearings, if it knocks at all it is to late. Do verify the reading with a mechanical gauge if you haven't done so already. The rule is this at least 10-15 pounds at idle with hot oil, 10 PSI per 1000 RPM of engine speed. If engine is not knocking then replace the oil pump with a high pressure high volume pump.

Oct 09, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

1979 chevy 350 modded to 383 stroker i have been


Sounds like the engine can't breath,
make sure pcv valve is good,or oil cap is vented.
your engine is building up pressure and has no where to vent,so it blows the easiest thing,the dip stick

Nov 18, 2009 | 1983 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

Crank no start


JUST REMEMBER THE BASICS,COMP./SPARK/FUEL,IF ONES MISSING ,NO CRANK

Aug 20, 2009 | 1994 Chevrolet S-10 Blazer

1 Answer

383 Stoker Chevy dies when I put it in gear


That converter should make stalling less of an issue, not more. (stall speed is higher than stock) Make sure that you have the cam degreed in properly, that you have the timing set properly (I'd use 8-12 degrees to begin) and make sure that you have no vacuum leaks.
With a stock converter, you shouldn't use any cam with more than 220 degrees duration...With the higher stall converter, you may get a few more degrees leeway. Also, the carb is too small for the application...should have at least a 750 dbl pumper or larger on there depending largely upon the car weight, gearing and what you have as far as intake and exhaust. (header diameter, length and design)...This should have been all figured out on paper before spending a dime for parts...Biggest mistake I see is people putting "mis-matched" parts together and expecting it to work (everything needs to compliment everything else)

Jul 03, 2009 | 1996 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

No timeing marks on a chevy 383 stroker engine


you could bring it up on tdc on comp stroke and make your own mark on crank pulley and block then at least you know where tdc is and google some 383's that have close to same equip as you and see what degree they are running or just play with it and see how it runs .

Jun 04, 2009 | 1997 Chevrolet K1500

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cars & Trucks Logo

Related Topics:

63 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Cars & Trucks Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76673 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22219 Answers

Randy Ohler

Level 3 Expert

14585 Answers

Are you a Car and Truck Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...