Question about 1998 Volvo S70

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Engine heavy smoke,fill oil and can not see any oil on dipstick,i replaced seals on turbo.(was leaking)can sludge block oil going to the pan.

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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glennsmart
  • 818 Answers

SOURCE: oil leak?

Whoa whoa ... You've said that the car takes 7 quarts of oil. That's 14 pints. Depending on which engine variant is fitted, engine oil capacity is either:

  • 5.75 litres + 0.4 litre if the oil cooler is drained
  • Turbo - 3.85 litres + 0.6 litre if the oil cooler is drained
  • These figures are for a UK 3 litre version of the 960
If you've filled the car with 7 quarts of engine oil that's almost twice as much oil as should be in the engine. Did you mean pints when you wrote quarts?

If you've filled it with 7 quarts it's overfull. Way too full. Check your oil dipstick - remove it, wipe it clean and then dip the oil level. At the bottom of the dipstick there is a flattened wider part. The oil level should not be below the bottom of this marker, and nor should it be above it. If the oil level is way above the flattened marker bar - you're overfull and will have to drain some oil out of the engine. An overfilled engine will try and blow oil out from wherever it can as the oil system will over-pressurised.

Ok .. so there's no problem with the engine compression. The crankcase isn't overfilled with oil (the crankcase is known as the oil sump in the UK). There's no oil fouling of the plugs and the car isn't burning oil, just leaking it. There's no misfires or running

If the engine isn't overfilled with oil there may be a problem with a broken/sticking piston ring or piston/cylinder. That high oil loss you mention seems severe. A problem with a piston/ring/cylinder can allow the compression to leak past the rings/piston into the engine oil sump and pressurise it. Under pressure, the oil will try and leak to atmosphere from anywhere it can.

A blue smoky exhaust is also an indication of piston/ring problems. A quick check is to start the car. If there's a cloud of blue smoke at start up which clears quickly, it's like to be worn valve guides. If, when driving the car with a warm engine there's blue smoke on acceleration - it points to a problem with rings/piston.

A quick check is to remove the spark plugs. Is there engine oil on one or more of them? An oiled up plug indicates that the engine oil is finding its way up past the rings/piston - and if oil can find its way up to a spark plug, then exhaust gasses/compressed fuel/air can find its way into the engine oil sump and pressurise it.

Another quick check is to start the engine and remove the oil dipstick. If fumes are 'chugging' out of the tube or oil is spitting out, that's another sure-fire sign that the oil sump is becoming pressurised due to a piston ring/piston/cylinder problem.

If you possess or can borrow an engine compression tester there is a further test you can do yourself to confirm whether or not there are piston/ring problems. Basically, a compression tester is just a gauge that screws into the cylinder head in place of the spark plug.

Warm the engine for 5 minutes so that the pistons expand fully in the bores.
Remove the spark plugs
Fit the compression tester into No1 cylinder and crank the engine for 10 seconds. Make a note of the compression reading on the gauge.
Do the same for each cylinder.

Here's an example of what you might find (the figures are for example only)
Cylinder Reading
1 115
2 120
3 118
4 95
5 96
6 117

Figures vary, but there should not be more than a 10% difference between the readings.
In the example above you can see that cylinders 4 and 5 have readings that are well below those of the other cylinders. This is indicating problems within those two cylinders. The lower compression could be due to a head/gasket fault or piston ring/piston problem. A split or worn exhaust valve in the head may cause low compression, a misfire and uneven running but it won't cause the engine oil sump/crankcase to pressurise. Now, some fine tuning to locate the exact problem:

Put a liberal squirt of oil into each cylinder - something like Redex, WD40 or engine oil.Put a cloth over each spark plug hole and spin the engine to get rid of the excess oil. The idea is that the oil you have squirted into the piston bores will form a 'seal' around the outside of the piston/rings.

Do the compression tests again and note the readings. If the readings go up significantly it indicates that the rings/pistons/bore has a problem. Readings that go up significantly are due to the oil forming a seal around the piston which raises the compression whilst testing. Here's an example:Cylinder Reading on 1st test 2nd test
1 115 118
2 120 121
3 118 120
4 95 110 Significant rise - more than 10%
5 96 98
6 117 119

Ok .. all this means is that cylinder 4 has compression problems due to the rings/piston/bore. The 2nd compression reading (with the oil squirted in) is higher simply because the oil formed a seal. Cylinder number 5 still has a low reading which didn't increase significantly on the 2nd 'wet' (when oil is added) test. This suggests that the problem is an exhaust valve/head gasket/head problem.

If there had been no significant increase in the reading on number 4 cylinder, this would suggest valve/gasket head problem. Low readings on adjoining cylinders (and which don't increase with the 2nd compression 'wet' oil test) would indicate a faulty head gasket between those two cylinders.

I'll continue this article ... ran out of word space

Posted on Sep 18, 2008

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  • 36 Answers

SOURCE: 1988 Volvo 740 Smoke from Oil Cap and Dipstick hole when removed

The smoke coming from the valve cover and dipstick is called blowby. It is combustion gases the have passes by the piston rings . A small amount of blowby is normal on all engines. The PCV system(Positve Crankcase Ventilation)pulls the gases out and directs them back into the egine to be burnt again. I would first check the PCV system to make sure it is working proper. Also a compression test of the engine will tell you which cylinder is not sealing proper. If the compression test is ok, a leak down check of the cylinders will determine if the engine is wore out.

Posted on Mar 12, 2009

  • 14036 Answers

SOURCE: 2001 volvo xc70 engine leaking

check turbo oil return pipe make sure it not clogged up .make oil pipe to turbo not leaking oil.

Posted on Apr 20, 2009

  • 74 Answers

SOURCE: Oil Leaking into the exhaust

hi there, there are chemicals on the market that will soften up the seals but these take time to work i would suggest changing the turbo, you will also have to remove the oil from the exhaust system this can be done with other chemicals like an upper cylinder cleaner feed directly in to the air intake but only after the turbo has be fixed
Regards JR

Posted on May 18, 2009

  • 4088 Answers

SOURCE: 2001 Volvo s40 oil leaking in turbo, smokes white

Water in combustion chamber makes white smoke--suspect that the head gasket is leaking water into the chamber. If oil leaking around turbo, it may have a bad bearing and bad oil seal. Check waste gate valve and control.

Posted on Aug 01, 2009

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1992 cadillac deville leaking oil at dipstick


I would look for other leaks. If you are sure it's leaking at the dipstick tube, there is normally an o-ring where the tube presses into the engine. In general, this is an odd place for a leak, as ther eshould be no oil pressure in the pan (where the tube terminates) and unless the engine is overfilled with oil, the tube end shouldn't be immersed in oil to leak. IF there is pressure in the oil pan, that generally indicates bad rings. I have seen engines where the oil dipstick actually pops out of the tube under pressure when the engine is running due to pressure in the oil pan from blow-by at the rings.

Jan 05, 2014 | 1992 Cadillac DeVille

2 Answers

When changing the oil pan on a 2006 town & country do you have tighten the bolts in a sequence?



Removal & Installation

2.4L Engine

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions Section.
  2. Drain the engine oil.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Negative battery cable Structural collar A/C compressor bracket to oil pan bolt Oil pan
  4. Clean the oil pan and all gasket mating surfaces.

To install:
  1. Install or connect the following:

    Oil pan gasket to the block after applying engine RTV at the oil pump parting line Oil pan. Torque the bolts to 105 inch lbs. (12 Nm). Structural collar Negative battery cable
  2. Fill the crankcase to the correct level.
  3. Start the engine, check for leaks and repair if necessary.

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions Section.
  2. Drain the engine oil.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Negative battery cable Structural collar A/C compressor bracket to oil pan bolt Oil pan
  4. Clean the oil pan and all gasket mating surfaces.

To install:
  1. Install or connect the following:

    Oil pan gasket to the block after applying engine RTV at the oil pump parting line Oil pan. Torque the bolts to 105 inch lbs. (12 Nm). Structural collar Negative battery cable
  2. Fill the crankcase to the correct level.
  3. Start the engine, check for leaks and repair if necessary.

3.0L Engine
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions Section.
  2. Drain the engine oil.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Negative battery cable Starter motor Front motor mount bracket Bending braces Torque converter dust shield Oil pan

    0996b43f8020961b.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig. Oil pan mounting bolt tightening sequence-3.0L engine


To install:
  1. Clean the oil pan all mating surfaces.
  2. Apply RTV gasket material to the oil pan.
  3. Install or connect the following:

    Oil pan. Tighten the bolts in sequence to 50 inch lbs. (6 Nm). Torque converter dust shield Bending braces Front motor mount bracket Starter motor Negative battery cable
  4. Fill the crankcase to the correct level.
  5. Start the engine, check for leaks and repair if necessary.

3.3L & 3.8L Engines
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions Section.
  2. Drain the engine oil.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Negative battery cable Engine oil dipstick Drive belt splash shield Strut to transaxle attaching bolt and loosen the strut to engine attaching bolts Transaxle case cover Oil pan fasteners Oil pan and gasket

To install:
  1. Clean the oil pan and all mating surfaces.
  2. Apply a 1 / 8 inch bead of gasket material at the parting line of the chain case cover and the real seal retainer.
  3. Install or connect the following:

    New gasket on the oil pan Oil pan. Torque the bolts to 105 inch lbs. (12 Nm). Transaxle case cover All bending brace bolts Drive belt splash shield Engine oil dipstick Negative battery cable
  4. Fill the crankcase to the correct level.
  5. Start the engine, check for leaks and repair if necessary.

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions Section.
  2. Drain the engine oil.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Negative battery cable Engine oil dipstick Drive belt splash shield Strut to transaxle attaching bolt and loosen the strut to engine attaching bolts Transaxle case cover Oil pan fasteners Oil pan and gasket

To install:
  1. Clean the oil pan and all mating surfaces.
  2. Apply a 1 / 8 inch bead of gasket material at the parting line of the chain case cover and the real seal retainer.
  3. Install or connect the following:

    New gasket on the oil pan Oil pan. Torque the bolts to 105 inch lbs. (12 Nm). Transaxle case cover All bending brace bolts Drive belt splash shield Engine oil dipstick Negative battery cable
  4. Fill the crankcase to the correct level.
  5. Start the engine, check for leaks and repair if necessary.

May 05, 2012 | 2006 Chrysler Town & Country

2 Answers

WHY DOES MY 1993 7.3 TURBO SMOKE SO BAD WHEN IT FIRST STARTS


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You did not tell us what color of smoke you see when you start the engine. If its white smoke, you could have some injectors leaking or some of the glow plugs are beginning to go


If its blue smoke you could have problems with the valve seals leaking or even leaking from the turbo. If the turbo seals are leaking leaking into the down pipe, there would be a lot of very oily black sludge built up and if you looked into the turbine there was a lot of oil around the wheel as well. You can check your turbo for end play and even disconnect your down pipe and stick a finger inside to check for oily sludge. Black soot is normal, but it should be bone dry in there.


And of course black smoke can be a combination but most likely dirty air filter and air system.

Mar 07, 2011 | 1993 Ford F350

1 Answer

Have a 1999 eclipse 2.0 L...Need to replace oil pan. Do I have to remove any other parts to get the pan off


2.0L Engine
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Drain the engine oil.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:
    Engine undercover Front exhaust pipe Lower oil pan bolts and lower pan Cover Upper oil pan bolt and upper pan Baffle plate

    0996b43f8023193a.jpg Fig. Oil pan and related components-2.0L engine

To install:
  1. Clean all gasket surfaces of the cylinder block and the upper and lower oil pan.
  2. Install or connect the following:
    Baffle plate
  3. Apply a 0.16 in. (4mm) bead of sealant to the gasket surfaces of the upper oil pan.
    Upper oil pan onto the cylinder block within 15 minutes after applying sealant. Tighten the bolts as shown in the accompanying figure.

    0996b43f8023192d.jpg Fig. Upper oil pan bolt location and torque sequence-2.0L engine

  4. Apply 0.16 in. (4mm) bead of sealant to the gasket surfaces of the lower oil pan.
    Lower oil pan and tighten the bolts, in the sequence shown, to 88-106 inch lbs. (10-12 Nm)

    0996b43f8023192e.jpg Fig. Lower oil pan bolt tightening sequence-2.0L engine
    Front exhaust pipe Engine undercover Oil drain plug with a new gasket and tighten to 29 ft. lbs. (40 Nm)

    0996b43f8023192f.jpg Fig. Make sure to the install the new drain plug gasket as shown, or leaks will occur

  5. Lower the vehicle and fill the crankcase to the proper level with clean engine oil.
  6. Connect the negative battery cable. Start the engine and check for leaks.
Non-Turbo Engine
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Raise and safely support the vehicle.
  3. Drain the engine oil into a suitable container.
  4. Once the oil has completely drained, install the plug and tighten to 25 ft. lbs. (34 Nm).
  5. Remove the front exhaust pipe.
  6. Remove the engine oil dipstick and tube assembly.
  7. Remove the front plate.
  8. Unfasten the oil pan mounting bolts, then remove the oil pan and gasket.

    0996b43f80222121.jpg Fig. Exploded view of the oil pan and related components-1999 2.0L non-turbo engine

To install:
  1. Apply sealant at the point where the engine block meets the oil pump.
  2. Use a new gasket and install the oil pan. Tighten the mounting bolts to 8.9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm).
  3. Install the front plate.
  4. Install the front exhaust pipe.
  5. Install the dipstick and tube assembly.
  6. Safely lower the vehicle to the floor.
  7. Refill the crankcase with oil to the proper level.
  8. nnect the negative battery cable.
  9. Start the engine and check for leaks.

Turbo Engine
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Safely raise and support the vehicle.
  3. Remove the front exhaust pipe.
  4. Remove the exhaust pipe and muffler assembly.
  5. Drain the engine oil into a suitable container. Once the oil has drained completely, tighten the plug to 29 ft. lbs. (39 Nm).
  6. Remove the dipstick and tube.
  7. For AWD vehicles, remove the transfer case assembly as follows:
    1. With the propeller shaft still installed, remove the transfer mounting bolt.
    2. Insert a suitable prytool in between the transfer case and transaxle, then remove the transfer case from the center shaft.
    3. Remove the transfer case from the center shaft. Do NOT tilt the transfer assembly to the rear or oil will leak out.
    4. After removing the transfer assembly, insert tool MB991193 or equivalent, to prevent the oil from leaking out. Use a piece of wire to suspend the transfer case from the body.

      0996b43f80222122.jpg
      Fig. View of the transfer case with the tool installed to prevent oil from leaking out-1999 2.0L turbo engines
  8. Remove the bell housing cover.
  9. Disconnect the oil return pipe from the oil pan.
  10. Remove the oil pan mounting bolts. Tap the oil pan seal breaker MB998727 or equivalent between the oil pan and the engine block to break the seal and remove the oil pan.

    0996b43f80222123.jpg Fig. Exploded view of the oil pan and sealant application-1999 2.0L Turbo engine

To install:
  1. Clean the sealing surface on the oil pan and engine block. Apply a continuous bead of sealant MD970389 or equivalent to the oil pan.
  2. Clean the oil pan mounting bolt holes in the oil seal case.
  3. Install the oil pan to the engine block. Tighten the mounting bolts to 5.1 ft. lbs. (6.9 Nm).
  4. Use a new gasket and connect the oil return pipe to the oil pan.
  5. Install the bell housing cover.
  6. If equipped with AWD, install the transfer case assembly.
  7. Install the dipstick and tube assembly.
  8. Install the front exhaust pipe.
  9. Install the exhaust pipe and muffler.
  10. Install a new oil filter.
  11. Safely lower the vehicle to the floor and add five quarts of oil to the crankcase.
  12. Connect the negative battery cable.
  13. Start the engine and check for leaks.

Good luck (remember rated this help).

Mar 06, 2010 | 1999 Mitsubishi Eclipse

1 Answer

1991 oldsmobile toronado engine wont turn over


YOU SEEN WHITE SMOKE THAT HEAD GASKET LEAK.CHECK ENGINE OIL DIPSTICK.IF IT LOOKS LIKE CHOCOLATE MILKSHAKE THATS HEAD GASKET LEAKING CAUSING A LOT OF ANTIFREEZE ENTER THE OIL PAN.CAUSING THE ENGINE TO HYDRASTATIC LOCK.WHEN TOO MUCH ANTIFREEZE GETS IN THE CRANKCASE IT DILUTES OIL UNTIL IT STOP LUBRICATING ENGINE CAUSING CRANKSHAFT BEARINGS AND PISTON TO SEIZED UP LOCK UP THE ENGINE.ENGINE HAS TO BE REPLACED.

Mar 01, 2010 | 1991 Oldsmobile Toronado

1 Answer

I would like some advise on my saab se turbo please my car is blowing blue smoke ive been told it is my turbo if so could it of done any damage to my engine


IS the smoking extremly heavy ? Extreme heavy smoke where you cant see behind the car would indicate turbo. If this is the case no engine damage should have occured. The turbo on these cars are oil and water cooled, The heavy smoke indicates a worn seal in the turbocharger is leaking oil directly into the exhaust system and burning there. Catylitic and oxygen sensor damage may occur but engine damage is unlikely.

Oct 17, 2009 | Saab 9 5 Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

1997 volvo850gtl extreme smoking from exhaust


black smoke ( burning too much gas)
blue smoke (burning oil)
white smoke ( burning coolant)
hope this helps

Jun 15, 2009 | 1999 Oldsmobile Bravada

2 Answers

Instructions on performing an oil chane on a 1993 crown victoria


Lift the front of the car and support it on jack stands. Open the hood. Run the engine for a max of 5 mins. The goal is to warm the oil without making it (or anything you may touch) too hot (avoiding burns). remove the oil filler cap on the valve cover.

Put a pan below the oil filter (drivers side on the 4.6l v-8 engine). Unscrew the oil filter with a suitable oil filter wrench. Counterclockwise rotation will remove it. allow the oil in this area to drain fully.

Move the pan under the engine's oil pan. At it's lowest point there will be an angled bolt. Carefully loosen the bolt (counterclockwise rotation). Expect a healthy stream of oil to flow out quickly. Dont drop the bolt, it has a magnet on the end that will show if you have and metal debris in the engine oil. A few little flakes are nornal, chunks are not and indicates some engine problems.

When the oil has drained out, replace the bolt being careful not to overtighten (it's easy to strip the threads then you will have bigger problems). The washer on the bolt will seal from leaks so no need to overtorque it.

Next fill the filter with fresh oil and rub a slight amount on the rubber gasket seal at the perimeter of the filter. Install the oil filter until the gasket seal touches the milled face of the engine block. Turn 1/4 to 1/2 turn further to seal correctly.

Fill with the required amount of oil. Install the oil filler cap, visually inspect for any oil leaks. If none, start the engine and make sure the oil pressure dash light goes out (or the needle indicates pressure) within 5 seconds. If not, turn off engine quickly. If oil pressure is good, let it run for 1-2 mins. Turn it off, check under the car, and around the fliter for any fresh leaks. With the engine off, check the oil level on the dipstick with the car on level ground. If you need a little more oil to keep the level in the marked area on the dipstick, add some. DO NOT overfill the engine. Engine damage will occur. If you've put too much oil in, remove the drain bolt (as explained above).
Drop your used oil off at a collection depot (dont pour it down the drain, it's totally toxic to organic life).

You're done.

May 01, 2009 | 1993 Ford Crown Victoria

3 Answers

White smoke and engine pressure


White smoke out of the exhaust; blown head gasket.

Apr 17, 2009 | 1998 Volvo V70

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