Question about 1999 Chevrolet S-10 Pickup

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1999 chevy s 10 doesnt have compression

I checked the timing chain, its good. Piston goes up and down but no compression. Not enough play in the timing chain to jump. Any ideas?

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  • John Savela
    John Savela Mar 13, 2009

    didnt check all cylinders but it turns over like the head is off of it.

  • John Savela
    John Savela Mar 13, 2009

    I have 1 plug out, no comp in that cyl. Its acting like the cam isnt turning. Ill check comp in all cyl and get back to you but it sounds and acts like there is no comp at all in any cyl. Ill get back to you thanks

  • Roberta Smith
    Roberta Smith May 11, 2010

    if you have all the spark plugs out it will... check the compression in each cyclinder with all the spark plugs out.... and let us know what it is

  • Roberta Smith
    Roberta Smith May 11, 2010

    no compression in ALL the cylinders ? how many miles on the motor ?

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If you can see the camshaft.... confirm it is turning... it may have broken.... that did happen to me once. i was able to confim that by removing the cap where i added oil and watching the cam when it was being started

Posted on Mar 13, 2009

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You could have a burnt valve if there is no compression in just one cylinder. It could be a broken valve spring. It could be a hole in the piston. If you have no compression in all the cylinders then most likely it's cam timing.(chain jumped).

Posted on Mar 13, 2009

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2 Answers

What causes bad compression in my cars engine


How many miles on the engine ? Worn piston rings ! worn timing chain , jumped time ! engine worn out !

Feb 15, 2015 | 1999 Lincoln Town Car

1 Answer

I think my timing chain jumped time my truck died going down the road kinda like it bogged down then just stopped running and it wont start back when u try to start it it will turn over for couple seconds...


well first off you need to start by checking the compression on all 8 cylinders!!!! to rule out internal engine failure as oppose to jumped timing. its very rare that timing chains will jump especially a double roller chain. get a compression gauge take the plugs out and get a reading on all the cylinders. you should be no more then 10-20psi difference from cylinder to cylinder. but on the chevy motors if there is a problem they usually show well on a compression test! good luck post back up the results then we can go from there.

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Looking for a 2.2 ecotec timing chain diagram with pictures


Getting the timing chain back on these engines can be tricky and requires more than just a diagram to get right. Here is how the timing chain should be reinstalled. Keep in mind that this engine can cause damage to the valves if the timing chain has any problems while the engine is running so it may not be a bad idea to setup the timing system as follows and do a compression test to make sure that everything is in order there.
Install the crankshaft sprocket with timing mark at the 5 o'clock position. Lower the timing chain through the opening in the top of the cylinder head. Carefully ensure that the chain goes around both sides of the cylinder block bosses (See 1 & 2 in picture): http://gsi.xw.gm.com/image_en_us/gif/000/000/412/412535.gif

Install the intake camshaft sprocket with the INT diamond at the 2 o'clock position. Hand tighten a NEW intake camshaft sprocket bolt. Route the timing chain around the crankshaft sprocket with the matching colored link aligning with the timing mark. Route the timing chain around the intake camshaft sprocket with the uniquely colored link (1) aligning with the INT diamond: http://gsi.xw.gm.com/image_en_us/gif/000/000/466/466558.gif

Install the timing chain tensioner guide through the opening in the top of the cylinder head. Tighten the timing chain tensioner guide bolt to 10 N·m (89 lb in): http://gsi.xw.gm.com/image_en_us/gif/000/000/412/412160.gif

Install the exhaust camshaft sprocket with the timing chain matching colored link (3) at EXH triangle aligned at the 10 o'clock position: http://gsi.xw.gm.com/image_en_us/gif/000/000/466/466570.gif

Ensure the timing marks and the colored links (1,2,3) are correctly aligned: http://gsi.xw.gm.com/image_en_us/gif/000/002/003/2003412.gif

Use a 24 mm wrench to rotate the camshaft slightly, until exhaust sprocket aligns with the camshaft. Hand tighten the NEW exhaust camshaft sprocket bolt: http://gsi.xw.gm.com/image_en_us/gif/000/000/412/412536.gif

Install the fixed timing chain guide. Tighten the fixed timing chain bolts to 10 N·m (89 lb in): http://gsi.xw.gm.com/image_en_us/gif/000/000/412/412165.gif

Apply sealant, GM P/N 12378521 (Canadian P/N 88901148) compound to thread and install the timing chain guide bolt access hole plug. Tighten the chain guide plug to 90 N·m (66 lb ft): http://gsi.xw.gm.com/image_en_us/gif/000/000/412/412164.gif

Install the timing chain upper guide. Tighten the timing chain upper guide bolts to 10 N·m (89 lb in): http://gsi.xw.gm.com/image_en_us/gif/000/000/412/412167.gif

Inspect the timing chain tensioner. If the timing chain tensioner, O-ring seal, or washer is damaged, replace the timing chain tensioner. Measure the timing chain tensioner assembly from end to end. A new tensioner should be supplied in the fully compressed non-active state. A tensioner in the compressed state will measure 72 mm (2.83 in) (a) from end to end. A tensioner in the active state will measure 85 mm (3.35 in) (a) from end to end.

****If the timing chain tensioner is not in the compressed state, perform the following steps. Remove the piston assembly from the body of the timing chain tensioner by pulling it out. Set the J 45027-2 (2) into a vise. Install the notch end of the piston assembly into the J 45027-2 (2). Using the J 45027-1 (1), turn the ratchet cylinder into the piston: http://gsi.xw.gm.com/image_en_us/gif/000/000/797/797246.gif

Inspect the bore of the tensioner body for dirt, debris, and damage. If any damage appears, replace the tensioner. Clean dirt or debris out with a lint free cloth. Install the compressed piston assembly back into the timing chain tensioner body until it stops at the bottom of the bore. Do not compress the piston assembly against the bottom of the bore. If the piston assembly is compressed against the bottom of the bore, it will activate the tensioner, which will then need to be reset again. At this point the tensioner should measure approximately 72 mm (2.83 in) (a) from end to end. If the tensioner does not read 72 mm (2.83 in) (a) from end to end repeat the steps required to return it to it's compressed state above.

Install the timing chain tensioner. Tighten the timing chain tensioner to 75 N·m (55 lb ft). Use a suitable tool with a rubber tip on the end. Feed the tool down through the camshaft drive chant to rest on the timing chain. Then give a sharp jolt diagonally downwards to release the tensioner: http://gsi.xw.gm.com/image_en_us/gif/000/000/412/412158.gif

Use a 24 mm wrench to hold the camshaft. Tighten the NEW camshaft bolts to 85 N·m (63 lb ft) plus 30 degrees: http://gsi.xw.gm.com/image_en_us/gif/000/000/630/630311.gif

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1 Answer

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