Question about 2007 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited

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Wheel alignment 2007 Santa Fe needs a camber kit

I had this vehicle aligned at hyundai and tires wore on the inside after alignment when I brought it back they said that I didn't know what I was talking about. I brought it to a Goodyear tire place they told me that the vehicle was way out and that i need to buy a camber kit because ther is no way to get this vehicle into proper alignment without this camber kit. the only thing that bothered me is on the print out that I got had 2005 Sana Fe on it and when I asked I was told that they are the same. ARE THEY?

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  • flesto Mar 12, 2009

    Are the spec's the same for a 2005 and a 2007 which has a whole new chassis and body which is wider and longer?

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I do alignments.. Some programs require a certain amount of weight to be distributed inside the vehicle.. some programs compensate.. some programs dont even care..Find out what they are using.. However , the camber kit sounds right. I recommend hunter alignment equipment be used on mine.. Hope this helps.. Good luck

Posted on Mar 12, 2009

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Wheel alignment santa fe 2001


did u do the alignment yourself or sameone did it for u, if so take the car to kwikfit for wheel alignment so that they can put it in the machine for a proper alignment.

Oct 16, 2013 | 2001 Hyundai Santa Fe

Tip

Should I worry about my vehicle's alignment


Alignment refers to the way your car's wheels are positioned. Your wheels should be parallel and facing forward.

How does alignment affect my vehicle?
When your wheels are properly aligned, you'll get better gas mileage, your tires will last longer, steering will be easier, and your ride will be smoother and safer.

What could go wrong with my alignment?
Several factors could contribute to a shift in alignment including old, worn-out components including Ball Joints, Control arm bushings, and poor road conditions, resulting in a few different problems including Camber, Toe and Caster, and if any of these problems develop, they will take a toll on your vehicle's tires, performance and manageability. Worn out shocks and struts can also be a serious problem with un-even tire wear.


Camber
The wheels are tilted, either inward or outward. This will create pulling and tire wear.


Toe
A change in the distance between the front and back of the front or rear tires. This will wear on the tires, too.


Caster
A backward or forward tilt at the top of the wheel's spindle support arm. This will cause either loose or difficult steering.



If any of these problems develop, they will begin to take their toll on your car's tires and performance, as well as steering

How will I recognize a problem with my alignment?
Check your steering wheel when you're driving. Does it stay straight? Does it vibrate? When you are traveling along a straight road, does your vehicle pull to one side? Is your steering loose, or difficult to control? Have you noticed uneven tire wear?


Check your tires periodically. A number of different things can affect your tires - from alignment to suspension components.
As a general rule, you should have your alignment and related components, such as ball joints, control arm bushings, checked every 10,000 miles or once a year, and there are three types of alignment jobs with a good-better-best approach.

GOOD
Two-wheel geometric centerline alignment.
This adjusts the toe on your front wheels only. This will work only if your rear wheels are properly aligned. (Used mostly on trucks and older rear-wheel drive cars).

BETTER
Four-wheel thrust line alignment.
This aligns the front wheels to the rear-wheel alignment.

BEST
Complete four-wheel thrust line alignment.
This is the optimal approach: aligning all wheels straight ahead and parallel.

After a thorough review of your alignment, your The Wright Import technician will present you with the findings and all of your options before beginning any work on your vehicle.

What is a wheel alignment? How does it effect handling and tire wear? When should I do an alignment? What causes alignments to go out? How would I know if my alignment is out?

A wheel alignment is nothing more than setting the angle of the hub/wheel so it tracks in the right direction. Most vehicles have four-wheel alignments, meaning each of the four wheels is separately aligned. Your basic alignment consists of three angles: camber, caster and toe-in. Camber is the tilt of the tire when viewed from the front of the car. Positive camber means the top of the tire is tilted away from the car. Negative camber means the top is tilted in. Camber has a lot to do with cornering performance. Too much negative camber will wear the inside of the tires prematurely. Too much positive camber will wear the outside tread.

Caster is the inclination of the front spindle. Picture the angle of the forks on a bike top to bottom. When the caster is out, it creates a pull or wandering condition and sometimes a slow responding steering wheel. Toe-in is measured in inches or degrees. Viewing from the front of the car, it is the difference between the front and rear center-line of the tire. Toe-in means the fronts of the tires are closer together. Toe-out means, the fronts of the tires are farther apart. Toe-in or out has the most effect on tire wear.

When your car is out of alignment, the tires will wear prematurely. In some extreme cases, new tires will be gone within 500 miles. At the price of tires, especially high performance tires with soft compounds, you want to keep your vehicle in alignment as long as possible. Other symptoms of an out-of-alignment car are poor handling, pulling to one side, or wandering from side-to-side. An alignment will also affect the steering wheel response and how quickly it returns to the center.

Your vehicle's alignment should be checked every 10,000 to 12,000 miles. Any harsh impact such as potholes, curbs, objects in the road, or the damage of an accident, should prompt you to have your alignment checked. If you do any modifications to your suspension, raising or lowering your car, that will affect the alignment angles. Even changing the tire size will effect the alignment. Loose, worn or bent suspension parts such as ball joints, springs, bushings, and control arms will have an adverse affect on your alignment, too. In most cases you do not know if your alignment is out. The best way to check it is with a precision alignment machine. Laser optics combined with a computer allow for the most accuracy in alignment readings.

Remember you are aligning the hub of your vehicle. Check to see if the alignment shop or dealer has equipment that attaches to the hub, not the wheel. Many independent shops that do alignments have a specialty tool called "Tru Align" that attaches to the hub. This will make for a much more accurate alignment with the added bonus of not damaging the delicate finish on your wheels.

There is a lot more to suspension alignment, especially if you push your vehicle on the track. The modifications you make on your suspension are just the beginning. Once you start down this road you will be concerned with things like bump steer, weighting (vertical load), pre-loading, tire traction versus tire load, and more. Now you're thinking under-steer, over-steer, tire compound, sway bar design, and other topics that can be covered in a later article. For now, just remember to have your vehicle aligned every 10,000 to 12,000 miles in normal driving conditions.
If you accidentally hit a curb, or drive through a nasty pothole or other road obstruction, that would be a cue to have your car's alignment checked more often. Proper alignment is good for your car. It will save unnecessary wear on your tires. It will ensure that your vehicle is giving you the handling the factory designed the car to have. And, most importantly, a properly aligned car is safer and more fun to drive. Have your alignment, ball joints and suspension checked regularly checked regularly

on Dec 11, 2009 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 2007 santa fe has had two wheel alignments, and I have replace all four tires twice. It's now on third set of tires and still all tires are wearing on the inside. Rotating the tires will change...


56,000 miles and 2 sets of tires. I would question the alignment process. Yes there could be some thing wrong with the vehicle, ie ball joints, control arm bushings, even a bent or out of aligned frame. But the alignment shop should have caught this. I align most vehicles, including front and four wheel drive by sight and driving them. Never had any one complain. I don't use sophisticated alignment racks, do it by the book and a tape measure. Also I haven't heard of any problems with your vehicle about alignments. I would try another shop. Keeping 4 wheels straight with each other is not that big of deal. Especially with newer vehicles. Old I beam suspensions are tough.

Jul 19, 2011 | Hyundai Santa Fe Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Front tires seemed to be bent in a little causing uneven and fast ware on tires


Take it to your mechanic and ask them to check your tie rods and then an alignment.

Aug 05, 2010 | 1995 Nissan Pickup

2 Answers

Mechanics say they cannot align the wheels that the adjustments are maxed out. Tires are still riding on inside edge??? Tire wear out in 12,oooomiles, inside edges are worn off


Tire riding on the inside edge means camber issue. Take it to another shop. Camber adjustment kits are available several places. Here is one example: http://www.stillen.com/product.asp?id=STICMBR01&c=SU&r=&b=&m=all

The factory didn't build enough adjustment into some vehicles. My Mustang GT has a similar issue easily fixed with an adjustment kit. Kit needs to be installed and vehicle re-aligned.

Hope this helps.

Bob

Nov 05, 2009 | 2004 Infiniti G35 Sport Coupe

3 Answers

Tires wearing inside on 2008 Impala LT


this is a wheel camber (in and out tilt of wheel and tire) problem, u may have to have a Camber adjustment kit put in, most new cars have no adjustment provided for this. the bottom line here is you need to see a really good front end shop to get this taken care of, also the tires will continue to wear this way even if problem is corrected, so may want to replace them or rotate them.

Jun 05, 2009 | 2008 Chevrolet Impala

2 Answers

Negative rear right camber


If you bought this vehicle second hand then you need to get your vehicle checked for crash damage. Your insurer can do a check on a vehicle register for a small cost, but that is only if the vehicle was damaged AND repaired/written off via an insurer. this does not guarantee that the vehicle has never been in an accident, you need to look underneath to see if there are any kinks, tears or ripples that don't look quite right. But I would advise taking to a professional repair shop for a good look over.
If the bolt has been replaced, and the readings are correct, then you should be safe enough, just drive steady. But if you are suspect of this vehicle get it checked .

May 21, 2009 | 2004 Hyundai Santa Fe

1 Answer

How can the rear suspension be adjusted?


REAR WHEEL ALIGNMENT
TOE-IN : 0±2 mm (0±0.08 in.)
note_icon.gif 1. The rear suspension lower arm mounting cam bolt should be turned an equal amount on both sides during adjustment. Right wheel : Clockwise direction : toe-in Left wheel : Clockwise direction : ton-out Maximum difference between LH and RH : 3mm 2. The cam bolt should be adjusted within a 90° range left or right from the center position. CAMBER Standard value : 0°±30´ Maximum difference between LH and RH : 3mm : 0±2 mm (0±0.08 in.) note_icon.gif 1. The rear suspension upper arm mounting cam bolt should be turned an equal amount on both sides during adjustment. 2. Install the left and right springs which have the same identification color. 3. The cam bolt should be adjusted within a 90° range left and right from the center position.e55b100.gif TIRE WEAR 1. Measure the tread depth of the tires. Tread depth of tire [Limit] : 1.6 mm (0.06 in.) 2. If the remaining tread depth is less than the limit, replace the tire. note_icon.gif When the tread depth of the tire is reduced to 1.6 mm (0.06 in.) or less, the wear indicators will appear.

Jun 16, 2008 | 2004 Hyundai Santa Fe

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