Question about 1996 Dodge Caravan

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I change the crank sensor and camshaft sensor and the ignition coil.i got sparks but no spark on # 3 and #6 cylinder

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  • Dodge Master
  • 412 Answers

Sounds like the engine controller is defective..coil driver circuits..have seen this before

Posted on May 23, 2009

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My 1994 cavalier lost spark to cylinders 1 and 4. Which components are directly related to ignition spark and timing? What about the camshaft sensor?


You listed all the components involved in spark timing and control- coil, ignition module, pcm, wires, plugs, crank sensor, and cam sensor.
Cylinders 1 and 4 have the same coil for both, so concentrate on that coil. You still have a good blue spark on cylinders 2 and 3? If you have spark there, I don't know about the cam sensor-I think it would be good if it works at all. You need to check if you have 12 volts power to the coil for 1 and 4.

Nov 20, 2012 | 1994 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

Spark plugs


Check this SPARK PLUG REPLACEMENT - REMOVAL PROCEDURE

1_23_2012_5_10_32_pm.jpg

1. Remove the ignition coils (lines at end this document), then return here once you have gotten the Coil
Packs off and precede with step 2 from here.
2. Clean the spark plug recesses with low pressure air. CAUTION: Wear safety glasses
when using compressed air, as flying dirt particles may cause eye injury. NOTE:
Clean the spark plug recess area before removing the spark plug. Failure to do so could
result in engine damage because of dirt or foreign material entering the cylinder head, or
by the contamination of the cylinder head threads. The contaminated threads may prevent
the proper seating of the new plug. Use a thread chaser to clean the threads of any
contamination.
3. Remove the spark plugs from the cylinder head. NOTE: Allow the engine to cool before
removing the spark plugs. Attempting to remove the spark plugs from a hot engine may
cause the plug threads to seize, causing damage to cylinder head threads.
4. Inspect the spark plugs.

INSTALLATION PROCEDURE

1_23_2012_5_11_30_pm.jpg

1. Measure the spark plug gap on the spark plugs to be installed. Compare the measurement
to the gap specifications. NOTE:
• Use only the spark plugs specified for use in the vehicle. Do not install spark
plugs that are either hotter or colder than those specified for the vehicle. Installing
spark plugs of another type can severely damage the engine.
• Check the gap of all new and reconditioned spark plugs before installation. The
pre-set gaps may have changed during handling. Use a round feeler gage to ensure
an accurate check. Installing the spark plugs with the wrong gap can cause poor
engine performance and may even damage the engine.
2. Install the spark plugs to the cylinder head. NOTE:
• Be sure that the spark plug threads smoothly into the cylinder head and the spark
plug is fully seated. Use a thread chaser, if necessary, to clean threads in the
cylinder head. Cross-threading or failing to fully seat the spark plug can cause
overheating of the plug, exhaust blow-by, or thread damage.
• Refer to Component Fastener Tightening Notice in Service Precautions.
Tighten the spark plugs to 18 N.m (13 lb ft).
3. Install the ignition coils.

IGNITION COIL(S) REPLACEMENT
REMOVAL PROCEDURE
1. Remove the air cleaner resonator and outlet duct.
2. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connector (1) from the oil pressure sensor (2).
3. Disconnect the engine wiring harness retainers (1) from the power steering pump (2).
4. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors (1, 4) from the following:
• The exhaust camshaft position (CMP) sensor (5)
• The camshaft position (CMP) actuator solenoid valve (6)
5. Disconnect the engine wiring harness retainer (2) from the camshaft cover (3).
6. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors from the following:
• The engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor (1)
• The fuel injector harness (2)
• The ignition coils (4)
• The heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) (5)
7. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connector from the intake camshaft position (CMP) sensor.
8. Carefully disengage the engine wiring harness conduit from the camshaft cover, and position aside.
9. Remove the ignition coil bolts.
10. Remove the ignition coils from the camshaft cover.

INSTALLATION PROCEDURE
1. Install the ignition coils into the camshaft cover. IMPORTANT: Ensure the ignition coil seals are properly seated to the camshaft cover.
2. Install the ignition coil bolts. NOTE: Refer to Fastener Notice in Service Precautions. Tighten the ignition coil bolts to 10 N.m (89 lb in).
3. Attach the engine wiring harness conduit to the camshaft cover.
4. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connector to the intake CMP sensor.
5. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors to the following:
• The ECT sensor (1)
• The fuel injector harness (2)
• The ignition coils (4)
• The HO2S (5)
6. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors (1, 4) to the following:
• The exhaust CMP sensor (5)
• The CMP actuator solenoid valve (6)
7. Connect the engine wiring harness retainer (2) to the camshaft cover (3).
8. Connect the engine wiring harness retainers (1) to the power steering pump (2).
9. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connector (1) to the oil pressure sensor (2).
10. Install the air cleaner resonator and outlet duct.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jan 23, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to change spark plugs in a 2005 chev colorado


SPARK PLUG REPLACEMENT - REMOVAL PROCEDURE

1_23_2012_5_10_32_pm.jpg

1. Remove the ignition coils (lines at end this document), then return here once you have gotten the Coil
Packs off and precede with step 2 from here.
2. Clean the spark plug recesses with low pressure air. CAUTION: Wear safety glasses
when using compressed air, as flying dirt particles may cause eye injury. NOTE:
Clean the spark plug recess area before removing the spark plug. Failure to do so could
result in engine damage because of dirt or foreign material entering the cylinder head, or
by the contamination of the cylinder head threads. The contaminated threads may prevent
the proper seating of the new plug. Use a thread chaser to clean the threads of any
contamination.
3. Remove the spark plugs from the cylinder head. NOTE: Allow the engine to cool before
removing the spark plugs. Attempting to remove the spark plugs from a hot engine may
cause the plug threads to seize, causing damage to cylinder head threads.
4. Inspect the spark plugs.

INSTALLATION PROCEDURE

1_23_2012_5_11_30_pm.jpg

1. Measure the spark plug gap on the spark plugs to be installed. Compare the measurement
to the gap specifications. NOTE:
• Use only the spark plugs specified for use in the vehicle. Do not install spark
plugs that are either hotter or colder than those specified for the vehicle. Installing
spark plugs of another type can severely damage the engine.
• Check the gap of all new and reconditioned spark plugs before installation. The
pre-set gaps may have changed during handling. Use a round feeler gage to ensure
an accurate check. Installing the spark plugs with the wrong gap can cause poor
engine performance and may even damage the engine.
2. Install the spark plugs to the cylinder head. NOTE:
• Be sure that the spark plug threads smoothly into the cylinder head and the spark
plug is fully seated. Use a thread chaser, if necessary, to clean threads in the
cylinder head. Cross-threading or failing to fully seat the spark plug can cause
overheating of the plug, exhaust blow-by, or thread damage.
• Refer to Component Fastener Tightening Notice in Service Precautions.
Tighten the spark plugs to 18 N.m (13 lb ft).
3. Install the ignition coils.

IGNITION COIL(S) REPLACEMENT
REMOVAL PROCEDURE
1. Remove the air cleaner resonator and outlet duct.
2. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connector (1) from the oil pressure sensor (2).
3. Disconnect the engine wiring harness retainers (1) from the power steering pump (2).
4. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors (1, 4) from the following:
• The exhaust camshaft position (CMP) sensor (5)
• The camshaft position (CMP) actuator solenoid valve (6)
5. Disconnect the engine wiring harness retainer (2) from the camshaft cover (3).
6. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors from the following:
• The engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor (1)
• The fuel injector harness (2)
• The ignition coils (4)
• The heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) (5)
7. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connector from the intake camshaft position (CMP) sensor.
8. Carefully disengage the engine wiring harness conduit from the camshaft cover, and position aside.
9. Remove the ignition coil bolts.
10. Remove the ignition coils from the camshaft cover.

INSTALLATION PROCEDURE
1. Install the ignition coils into the camshaft cover. IMPORTANT: Ensure the ignition coil seals are properly seated to the camshaft cover.
2. Install the ignition coil bolts. NOTE: Refer to Fastener Notice in Service Precautions. Tighten the ignition coil bolts to 10 N.m (89 lb in).
3. Attach the engine wiring harness conduit to the camshaft cover.
4. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connector to the intake CMP sensor.
5. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors to the following:
• The ECT sensor (1)
• The fuel injector harness (2)
• The ignition coils (4)
• The HO2S (5)
6. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors (1, 4) to the following:
• The exhaust CMP sensor (5)
• The CMP actuator solenoid valve (6)
7. Connect the engine wiring harness retainer (2) to the camshaft cover (3).
8. Connect the engine wiring harness retainers (1) to the power steering pump (2).
9. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connector (1) to the oil pressure sensor (2).
10. Install the air cleaner resonator and outlet duct.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jan 23, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Hi my 2006 cadillac cts has error codes po 300 303 305 343 347 368 392 and 496 can u tell me what they are or a website to find out thank u


P0300 is multiple engine misfire detected
P0303 is misfire in cylinder 3
P0305 is misfire in cylinder 5
P0343 is camshaft position sensor A (bank 1)
P0347 is camshaft position sensor A (bank 2)
P0368 is camshaft position sensor B (bank 1)
P0392 is camshaft position sensor B (bank2)
P0496 is EVAP Canister Purge System High Purge Flow

Jan 28, 2011 | 2006 Cadillac CTS

2 Answers

I have a 93 dodge caravan van that wont start it wants to turn over but won't.


For an engine to run, you need three things to happen inside the engine, compression, fuel and ignition, without any one of these components the engine will not run.
  • Compression - Engine compression caused by crankshaft rotation and pistons moving up and down inside the engine block. If the timing belt or timing chain fails it will cause the camshaft to become out of correlation with the crankshaft or allow the camshaft to stop rotating. Either of these conditions will cause the engine to lose compression and sometimes cause internal engine damage.
  • Fuel Delivery System - The fuel system includes: fuel pump, fuel injectors, pressure regulator, fuel filter and pressure lines. This system is used to supply fuel under pressure to the fuel injection system, the lack of fuel pressure or volume will cause the fuel delivery system to fail and the engine to stall or not start.
  • Ignition Spark Delivery System - The ignition system components include: spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor (if applicable), crankshaft angle sensor, camshaft angle sensor, ignition coil, ignition module, knock sensor and ECM (engine control module). The engine relies on the ignition spark to be delivered to the combustion camber at the correct time. If the ignition spark stops or is delivered at the wrong time the engine will not run or run poorly.
If Your Engine Cranks but Does Not Start Follow this Troubleshooting Guide
Most vehicles operate by the same principle; basic troubleshooting procedures apply to most cars.
  • Step 1: Anytime you have a problem with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) inspect all fuses using a test light and check the under hood power distribution center and under dash fuse panels. If all fuses test ok continue to the next step.
  • Step 2: To check for problems with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) and the fuses test ok a trouble code scan is needed to identify any system trouble. Use a simple scanner tool to retrieve trouble codes and see if they relate to the specific problem, like a crank angle sensor failure code. If the trouble code present does not pertain to the immediate problem like an EVAP code ignore it until a later time, after the car is running. The reason we repair non-related codes after the engine is running is because sometime false codes can be triggered by the engine not running. Once the engine is running again the code present might cycle and turn itself off. You might say "if the engine doesn't run shouldn't it have a trouble code?" Sometimes conditions occur that will not be detected by the computer, example: if the fuel pump fails the computer cannot detect the failure, so the engine doesn't start and the computer thinks everything is ok with no codes. If no trouble codes are present proceed to the next step.
poster.jpg?1292981965 Scan for Trouble Codes
  • Step 3: The spark plugs in your engine are used to ignite the compressed fuel air mixture. If the condition of the spark plugs are fouled by excessive fuel or carbon the engine will not start, backfire or run rough. Remove all spark plugs to inspect their condition. Please use this spark plug condition reference guide to see how the spark plugs are operating.
  • Step 4: Determine if the engine has compression, this can be done a number of ways but the most complete method is to perform a compression check. Remove the spark plugs and perform a compression test on one cylinder. If one cylinder has compression then the remaining cylinders usually will be close to the same. Crank the engine over about 5 seconds, normal compression readings should be between 125 psi and 160 psi on each cylinder. If no or little compression exists additional tests will be needed. The most common reason for an engine to lose compression is a timing belt or timing chain failure. If low or no compression exists remove the oil fill cap and observe camshaft rotation when the engine is cranked over. If no rotation exists the timing belt or chain has failed. If your engine has a timing belt and you cannot see the camshaft easily remove the upper bolts to the timing cover and gain visual access to the belt, recheck cam rotation by cranking the engine over. Sometimes a timing belt or chain can jump causing the camshaft to lose correlation with the crankshaft and therefore causing low compression. The best test for this condition is to remove the timing belt/chain cover and inspect timing marks. If the compression is ok proceed to next step.
  • Step 5: Test the ignition system output, ignition systems can vary in configuration but operate on the same principal. Ignition systems can consist of a coil, pick up coil, crank angle sensor, cam angle sensor, spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, ignition rotor and a distributor and any variations of these components. An ignition coil is a voltage stepper coil that transforms a low voltage (12 volts) signal into tens of thousands of volts needed to jump the gap of the spark plug. This coil is activated by an ignition module triggered by using the camshaft/crankshaft angle sensor; timing is adjusted by the ECM (computer).
    This primary electrical signal is generated by the ECM which calculates spark timing by using a variety of sensors including coolant temperature, mass air flow, and oxygen sensors. To perform a basic ignition output test you must have a test light and follow this ignition system output test video.
    crank_trigger_ignition_system.jpg
    Distributor less Ignition System Configuration
    Some ignition systems have a coil for each spark plug. This is called Direct Ignition (DI) system; there are no plug wires in this system just individually controlled ignition coils. The amount of coils or spark plugs depend on the number of cylinders the engine is designed with, example: four cylinders, six cylinders etc. To perform a basic ignition output test you must have a test light follow this ignition system output test video and substitute the ignition coil for the plug wire (Note: leave the coil trigger wires connected).
    coil_over_plug.jpg
    Coil Over Spark Plug
    If the ignition system test is weak or non-existent test the car fuses, both under hood power distribution center and the fuse panel under dash. This test is performed with a test light tool. The test light should illuminate on both sides of the fuse, if not the fuse has failed and needs to be replaced. If the fuses are ok a manufacturer specific repair procedure is required and an online auto repair manual is needed to continue. If the ignition system tests ok proceed to the next step.
poster.jpg?1292969781 Test Ignition System Video

Jan 12, 2011 | 1993 Dodge Caravan

3 Answers

The engine turnes but it wont start.


Free Auto Repair Advice by Professional Mechanics




Troubleshooting / Car Engine Cranks but Will Not Start / Engine Crank But Wont Start 2

* Why does my engine stall at idle?
* How do I change my spark plugs?
* Why does my engine stall?
* Why does the engine stall after replacing the battery?
* Why won't my engine crank over?
* How to retrieve trouble codes
* How to test fuel delivery system
* Engine cranks excessively
* Engine has excessive smoke
* Rapid ticking sounds when engine is cranked
* How to tune up your engine
* How to jump start your engine
* How to test an oxygen sensor
* How to open a car hood
* How a flywheel - flex plate works

Engine Cranks But Will Not Start

For an engine to run, you need three things to happen inside the engine, compression, fuel and ignition, without any one of these components the engine will not run. Follow the repair guide below:


Engine Configuration with Camshaft Operation

*

Compression - Engine compression caused by crankshaft rotation and pistons moving up and down inside the engine block. If the timing belt or timing chain fails it will cause the camshaft to become out of correlation with the crankshaft or allow the camshaft to stop rotating. Either of these conditions will cause the engine to lose compression and sometimes cause internal engine damage.
*

Fuel Delivery System - The fuel system includes: fuel pump, fuel injectors, pressure regulator, fuel filter and pressure lines. This system is used to supply fuel under pressure to the fuel injection system, the lack of fuel pressure or volume will cause the fuel delivery system to fail and the engine to stall or not start.
*

Ignition Spark Delivery System - The ignition system components include: spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor (if applicable), crankshaft angle sensor, camshaft angle sensor, ignition coil, ignition module, knock sensor and PCM (engine control module). The engine relies on the ignition spark to be delivered to the combustion camber at the correct time. If the ignition spark stops or is delivered at the wrong time the engine will not run or run poorly.

If your engine cranks but does not start follow this troubleshooting guide:
* Step 1 - Anytime you have a problem with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) inspect all fuses using a test light and check the under hood power distribution center and under dash fuse panels. If all fuses test ok continue to the next step.
* Step 2 - To check for problems with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) and the fuses test ok a trouble code scan is needed to identify any system trouble. Use a simple scanner tool to retrieve trouble codes and see if they relate to the specific problem, like a crank angle sensor failure code. If the trouble code present does not pertain to the immediate problem like an EVAP code ignore it until a later time, after the car is running. The reason we repair non-related codes after the engine is running is because sometime false codes can be triggered by the engine not running. Once the engine is running again the code present might cycle and turn itself off. You might say "if the engine doesn't run shouldn't it have a trouble code?" Sometimes conditions occur that will not be detected by the computer, example: if the fuel pump fails the computer cannot detect the failure, so the engine doesn't start and the computer thinks everything is ok with no codes. If no trouble codes are present proceed to the next step.
* Step 3 - The spark plugs in your engine are used to ignite the compressed fuel air mixture. If the condition of the spark plugs are fouled by excessive fuel or carbon the engine will not start, backfire or run rough. Remove all spark plugs to inspect their condition. Please use this spark plug condition reference guide to see how the spark plugs are operating.
* Step 4 - Determine if the engine has compression, this can be done a number of ways but the most complete method is to perform a compression check. Remove the spark plugs and perform a compression test on one cylinder. If one cylinder has compression then the remaining cylinders usually will be close to the same. Crank the engine over about 5 seconds, normal compression readings should be between 125 psi and 160 psi on each cylinder. If no or little compression exists additional tests will be needed. The most common reason for an engine to lose compression is a timing belt or timing chain failure. If low or no compression exists remove the oil fill cap and observe camshaft rotation when the engine is cranked over. If no rotation exists the timing belt or chain has failed. If your engine has a timing belt and you cannot see the camshaft easily remove the upper bolts to the timing cover and gain visual access to the belt, recheck cam rotation by cranking the engine over. Sometimes a timing belt or chain can jump causing the camshaft to lose correlation with the crankshaft and therefore causing low compression. The best test for this condition is to remove the timing belt/chain cover and inspect timing marks. If the compression is ok proceed to next step.
* Step 5 - Test the ignition system output, ignition systems can vary in configuration but operate on the same principal. Ignition systems can consist of a coil, pick up coil, crank angle sensor, cam angle sensor, spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, ignition rotor and a distributor and any variations of these components. An ignition coil is a voltage stepper coil that transforms a low voltage (12 volts) signal into tens of thousands of volts needed to jump the gap of the spark plug. This coil is activated by an ignition module triggered by using the camshaft/crankshaft angle sensor; timing is adjusted by the ECM (computer).

Hope helps (remember rated and comment this).

Aug 11, 2010 | 1999 Chevrolet Blazer

2 Answers

2007 Toyota Rav 4 ignition coil. Is the ignition coil or the ecm responsible for the firing order?


The crankshaft sensor and the camshaft sensor tell the ECM what to do and when the injectors/spark to occur.

Mar 28, 2010 | 2007 Toyota RAV4

1 Answer

How to change spark plugs on 2002 mk4 automatic golf


1 - High Tension cable
  • 4 to 8 Kohms
  • With suppression connector and spark plug connector
  • Only remove and install spark plug connector using tool T10029
2 - Ignition coil with output stage (-N70-, -N127-, -N291-, -N292-)
Connection, ignition wires:
  • HV1 = Cylinder 1
  • HV2 = Cylinder 2
  • HV3 = Cylinder 3
  • HV4 = Cylinder 4
3 - 10 Nm 4 - Connector
  • 6 pin
5 - Knock sensor 1 -G61-*
  • Contacts gold plated
  • Fitting location: Cylinder block intake side
6 - 2-pin connector
  • For knock sensor 1 -G61-
  • Contacts gold plated
  • Do not interchange
7 - Knock sensor 2 -G66-*
  • Contacts gold plated
  • Fitting location: Cylinder block intake side
8 - 2-pin connector
  • For knock sensor 2 -G66-
  • Contacts gold plated
  • Do not interchange
9 - 20 Nm
  • Tightening torque influences the function of the knock sensor
10 - Spark plug, 30 Nm
  • Type and electrode gap See test data, spark plugs.
  • Remove and install with 3122B
11 - Connector
  • Contacts gold plated
  • 3 pin
12 - 10 Nm 13 - 100 Nm
  • Use counter- hold tool 3415 to loosen and tighten
14 - Camshaft sprocket
  • With rotor for Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor
15 - Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor -G40-* 16 - Bracket
  • For Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor

Jun 04, 2009 | 2002 Volkswagen Golf

1 Answer

Timing the cams and crank with a belt


  1. Note: Electronic Ignition engine timing is entirely controlled by the PCM. Electronic Ignition engine timing is NOT adjustable. Do not attempt to check base timing. You will receive false readings.

The CKP sensor is used to indicate crankshaft position and speed by sensing a missing tooth on a pulse wheel mounted to the crankshaft. The CMP sensor is used by the COP Integrated EI System to identify top dead center of compression of cylinder 1 to synchronize the firing of the individual coils.
  1. The PCM uses the CKP signal to calculate a spark target and then fires the coil pack(s) to that target shown in Figure 51. The PCM uses the CMP sensor not shown in Figure 51 on COP Integrated EI Systems to identify top dead center of compression of cylinder 1 to synchronize the firing of the individual coils.
  1. The coils and coil packs receive their signal from the PCM to fire at a calculated spark target. Each coil within the pack fires two spark plugs at the same time. The plugs are paired so that as one fires during the compression stroke the other fires during the exhaust stroke. The next time the coil is fired the situation is reversed. The COP system fires only one spark plug per coil and only on the compression stroke.

    The PCM acts as an electronic switch to ground in the coil primary circuit. When the switch is closed, battery positive voltage (B+) applied to the coil primary circuit builds a magnetic field around the primary coil. When the switch opens, the power is interrupted and the primary field collapses inducing the high voltage in the secondary coil windings and the spark plug is fired. A kickback voltage spike occurs when the primary field collapses. The PCM uses this voltage spike to generate an Ignition Diagnostic Monitor (IDM) signal. IDM communicates information by pulsewidth modulation in the PCM.
  1. The PCM processes the CKP signal and uses it to drive the tachometer as the Clean Tach Out (CTO) signal.

2.5L V6

The ignition system consists of an ignition coil, spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The crankshaft position sensor signal is the basis for ignition timing calculations. The alternating voltage signal from the crankshaft position sensor is digitized by a pulse former within the powertrain control module. This digitized signal is then used to position the closing time of the primary circuit of the ignition coil.
Ignition timing is determined by the powertrain control module in response to engine operating conditions based on stored data tables or maps. Once ignition timing has been determined, the powertrain control module interrupts the current to the primary circuit of the ignition coil thus triggering the ignition spark which is supplied to the cylinders through the spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The ignition coils are triggered by the powertrain control module in pairs (cylinders 1 and 5, cylinders 4 and 3 and cylinders 2 and 6) sending one ignition spark to the firing cylinder and one ignition spark to the corresponding cylinder on the exhaust stroke. This ensures that any unburnt fuel residues remaining in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke are re - ignited to provide cleaner exhaust emissions.
---------------------------------------------------------------
2.0L 4 cynder

The ignition system consists of an ignition coil, spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The crankshaft position sensor signal is the basis for ignition timing calculations. The alternating voltage signal from the crankshaft position sensor is digitized by the powertrain control module. This digitized signal is then used to position the closing time of the primary circuit of the ignition coil.
Ignition angle is determined by the powertrain control module in response to engine operating conditions. Once ignition angle has been determined, the powertrain control module interrupts the current to the primary circuit of the ignition coil thus triggering the ignition spark which is supplied to the cylinders through the spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The ignition coils are triggered by the powertrain control module in pairs (cylinders 1 and 4 and cylinders 3 and 2) sending one ignition spark to the firing cylinder and one ignition spark to the corresponding cylinder on the exhaust stroke. This make sures that any unburnt fuel residues remaining in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke are re - ignited to provide cleaner exhaust emissions.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Integrated Electronic Ignition System The Integrated Electronic Ignition (EI) System consists of a crankshaft position (CKP) sensor, coil pack(s), connecting wiring, and PCM. The Coil On Plug (COP) Integrated EI System uses a separate coil for each spark plug and each coil is mounted directly onto the plug. The COP Integrated EI System eliminates the need for spark plug wires but does require input from the camshaft position (CMP) sensor.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Apr 05, 2009 | 1998 Ford Contour

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