Question about 2000 Mazda 626

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I just had the car inspected and it failed inspection because of the need to repair evr soilenoid and clean ports. How do you make this repair. Can anyone do it?

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  • Paullycarguy May 11, 2010

    What he said.

  • yadayada
    yadayada May 11, 2010

    what is the EVR solenoid?

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Hello, Your EGR valve is located on the side of your intake manifold. It allows exaust gasses to pass into the engines intake manifold to reduce engine emissions at higher engine speeds. Normally these valves are tested during smog checks and some times fail. The test is usually done with the engine running and the vaccumn line to the EGR valve removed and plugged. The tester attaches a vaccumn line with a vaccumn pump on it and start to pump vaccumn to the line the engine will then start to run bad and shake if the valve is working correctly. If this does not happen then several things could be wrong. The valve is defective and not opening. This can be tested with the engine off and watching the diaphram stem to see if it moves when vaccumn is applied. and stays while vaccumn is applied the the valve is operating properly and the exhaust end of the valve may need to be cleaned. Normally this is where the problem lies, but some times the ports ger really clogged up and need to be cleaned. This means that you are going to have to take some of the motor apart to facilitate the cleaning. You can first start by blowing some air thru the ports to see if they flow air and are open. The one that usually gets plugged is the one on the intake side that fees under the carburator or fuel injection ports. It gets plugged up from fuel and exhaust residue over the years. I have had good results cleaning the ports with Chemtool B-12 cleaner. It usually breaks the blockage down so it can be cleaned out. If you are mechanically inclined you can make the repairs yourself. It may or will require some disassembly of the intake/exhaust system of the vehicle and the purchase of gaskets and seals. Always disconnect the battery negative cable before working on the vehicle for safety reasons. Good Luck, RAC

Posted on Apr 18, 2009

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Runs rich


How can you fail more than once?

After you fail, you go to a repair shop &
resolve ALL Vehicle issues

Then the shop road tests until all 8 I/M Monitors
run clear ,or there is no reason to go back to inspection
knowing your going to fail.

The problem is the shops & peoples inability to explain
what they need taken care of.

If you never work on the vehicle for years,then you don't
go to inspection,it is a given you will fail

Spark Plugs-every 3 years
Check for Cylinder Misfires
Always install a New Air Filter before inspection
Always install new fresh full sys oil before inspection

Oxygen Senors get replaced every 100,000 miles

Have to road test with professional scan tool & look at
all data,check monitors,fuel trim,O2 etc & check for codes

You have to spend the money to evaluate the vehicle, to see
if it is ready to go for inspection,not many are,their just driven
& neglected

Rich could be-- O2 Sensors,Dirty MAF Sensor,Vacuum Leaks,
Injector Leaks & more,I have seen a dirty air filter fail a car

Mar 27, 2014 | Acura Integra Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

P1409


DTC P1409: MEASURE RESISTANCE ACROSS EGR VACUUM REGULATOR SOLENOID
Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) P1409 indicates that Self-Test has detected an electrical fault in the EVR circuit.

Possible causes:

Open EVR circuit.
Open VPWR circuit to EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid.
EVR circuit shorted to VPWR.
EVR circuit shorted to GND.
Damaged EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid.
Damaged PCM.
Key off.
Disconnect EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid.
Measure EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid resistance.
Is solenoid resistance between 26 and 40 ohms?
Yes No
The EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid resistance is within specification. GO to HE111 . REPLACE EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid. RECONNECT all components. COMPLETE PCM Reset to clear DTCs. RERUN Quick Test.

HE111 CHECK VPWR CIRCUIT VOLTAGE AT EGR VACUUM REGULATOR SOLENOID
Key on, engine off.
EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid disconnected.
Measure voltage between VPWR circuit at the EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid vehicle harness connector and chassis GND.
Is voltage greater than 10.5 volts?
Yes No
GO to HE112 . SERVICE open in VPWR circuit to EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid. RECONNECT all components. COMPLETE PCM Reset to clear DTCs. RERUN Quick Test.

HE112 CHECK EVR CIRCUIT RESISTANCE
Key off.
EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid disconnected.
Disconnect PCM. Inspect for damaged or pushed out pins, corrosion, loose wires. Service as necessary.
Install breakout box and leave PCM disconnected.
Measure resistance between Test Pin 47 (EVR) and EVR circuit at the EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid vehicle harness connector.
Is resistance less than 5.0 ohms?
Yes No
GO to HE113 . SERVICE open in EVR circuit. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test.

HE113 CHECK EVR CIRCUIT FOR SHORTS TO POWER OR GROUND
Key off.
EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid disconnected.
Breakout box installed, leave PCM disconnected.
Measure resistance between Test Pin 47 (EVR) and Test Pins 71 and 97 (VPWR) at the breakout box.
Measure resistance between Test Pin 47 (EVR) and Test Pins 24 and 103 (PWR GND) at the breakout box.
Is each resistance greater than 10,000 ohms?
Yes No
REPLACE damaged PCM. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test. SERVICE EVR circuit for short to VPWR or PWR GND. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test.

HE120 CONTINUOUS MEMORY DTC P1409: WIGGLE EGR VACUUM REGULATOR SOLENOID WHILE MONITORING VPWR
Continuous Memory DTC P1409 indicates that Continuous Memory Self-Test has detected an electrical malfunction in the EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid sometime during vehicle operation.

Note: If DTC P1409 was output in Key On Engine Off (KOEO) or Key On Engine Running (KOER) Self-Test, go to HE110 to diagnose present fault.

Possible causes:

Open EVR circuit.
Open VPWR circuit to EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid.
EVR circuit shorted to VPWR.
EVR circuit shorted to GND.
Damaged EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid.
Damaged PCM.
Disconnect PCM. Inspect for damaged or pushed out pins, corrosion, loose wires.
Install breakout box, leave PCM disconnected.
Measure voltage between Test Pin 47 (EVR) and Test Pins 24 (PWR GND) at the breakout box.
Key on.
Voltage must read greater than 10.5 volts. For an indication of a fault, look for this voltage to drop while performing the following:
Lightly tap on the EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid.
Wiggle the EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid connector.
Grasp the EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid vehicle harness connector and wiggle wires between solenoid and PCM.
Is a fault indicated?
Yes No
ISOLATE fault and SERVICE as necessary. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test. Unable to duplicate or identify fault at this time. GO to Pinpoint Test Step Z1 with the following data: DPFEGR and EGRVR PIDs and list of possible causes.

Sep 25, 2011 | 2001 Mazda Tribute

1 Answer

Check engine light on 2004 GMC Envoy. Had air intake sensor replaced. Failed inspection diagnostic code came up P0128. I have been told I needed an air pump, a tune -up, injectors cleaned etc. etc., I have...


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My suggestion is to find a different repair shop.

Oct 31, 2010 | 2004 GMC Envoy

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Failed inspection due to obd fails to communicate with test equip.


thats their problem with their equipment ,just tell them it encrypted software then the onus is on the test station to obtain it ?? trade secrets and all that ??then they will have to use a sensor up its exhaust like we do in europe

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1 Answer

How often should i change my air filter and spark plugs?


Hello there
here is the maintenance schedule in detail
Group 4:2002 and newer X-Type, 2000 and newer S-Type, 2003 and newer XK8 and XJ8 Annually or every 7,500 miles
  1. Change engine oil and filter with Mobil 1 0-40 or extended performance 5-30
  2. Check and top all other fluids
  3. Visually inspect undercarriage for problems
  4. Inspect tires and rotate every second small service
  5. Check wiper blades, replace if streaky
  6. Check windshield washers
  7. Check lights
  8. Check belts and hoses
  9. Check operation of air conditioner and heater
  10. Road test car and note any problems
Every 15,000 miles this work is added:
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Every 30,000 miles this work is added:
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  2. Replace air filter
  3. Replace cabin filter
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  10. Inspect engine
  11. Inspect engine mounts
  12. Inspect exhaust system
  13. Inspect fuel system
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  15. Inspect headlights, check aiming
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  18. Inspect steering system
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  20. Inspect wheel lug nuts
  21. Lubricate accelerator linkage
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  23. Lubricate weatherstripping
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1 Answer

The air conditioner doesn't work


HI. Here is a complete check list that will help you trouble shot thsi issue. You will find the problem in one or more of these areas stated below.

1. Check Drive Belts - The air conditioner utilizes a drive belt that supplies power to rotate the compressor, which is basically a refrigerant pump. If the belt fails the compressor has nothing to drive it, inspect and replace as needed to restore operation. If belt is intact proceed to the next step.

2. Check for Compressor Clutch Engagement - Turn the air conditioner to the "on" position and set controls to the coldest setting. Start the engine and allow to idle. Then open the hood and inspect the clutch at the front of the compressor, is it turning? "Engaged" if so, the system has enough refrigerant to activate. If the system is low on refrigerant it will not work properly. In this case an air conditioner recharge kit is needed to recharge the system. If the system is low on refrigerant it could cycle on and off, making a ticking noise. If the compressor clutch is not turning proceed to next step.

3. Inspect for Refrigerant Leaks - If the system has a large leak and no refrigerant remains it will not activate. First test system for a static pressure charge, with the engine off attach an ac gauge to the low side pressure port and check the state of charge. Depending on outside temperature there should be between 50 psi and 80 psi. (Cool and warm). A refrigerant leak detector is needed to inspect for leak, but if you do not have a leak detector there is an alternative method. The air conditioner system is designed to run with oil suspended in the refrigerant to lubricate the system. Check for oily residue outside the system by inspecting all hoses, compressor, condenser, evaporator or receiver drier and replace any component that has failed.

4. Inspect Fuses - Check under dash panel and under hood power distribution center. Replace failed fuses as needed, recheck system. If the new fuse fails when reinstalled a short circuit is present and requires diagnosing with a wiring schematic, follow circuits to locate short, repair as needed and recheck system.

5. Check Temperature Control Vents - The vents inside your car are controlled by a cable, electrical servo or vacuum servo. If the temperature blend door is not functioning properly it will cause warm air from the heater to exit the vents. To check this start the car and allow the engine idle, next turn the blower motor speed on low, switch the temperature control from warm to cold while your ear is close to the vents. You should hear the door move inside the heater box as it swings from open to close. If not, insect for a vacuum leak or a shorted motor in the servo, repair the leak or replace the servo motor.

Oct 02, 2009 | 1992 Honda Accord

1 Answer

Air conditioner not working. Coolant seems to be full.


Check the following areas in order to address this issue.

1. Check Drive Belts - The air conditioner utilizes a drive belt that supplies power to rotate the compressor, which is basically a refrigerant pump. If the belt fails the compressor has nothing to drive it, inspect and replace as needed to restore operation. If belt is intact proceed to the next step.

2. Check for Compressor Clutch Engagement - Turn the air conditioner to the "on" position and set controls to the coldest setting. Start the engine and allow to idle. Then open the hood and inspect the clutch at the front of the compressor, is it turning? "Engaged" if so, the system has enough refrigerant to activate. If the system is low on refrigerant it will not work properly. In this case an air conditioner recharge kit is needed to recharge the system. If the system is low on refrigerant it could cycle on and off, making a ticking noise. If the compressor clutch is not turning proceed to next step.

3. Inspect for Refrigerant Leaks - If the system has a large leak and no refrigerant remains it will not activate. First test system for a static pressure charge, with the engine off attach an ac gauge to the low side pressure port and check the state of charge. Depending on outside temperature there should be between 50 psi and 80 psi. (Cool and warm). A refrigerant leak detector is needed to inspect for leak, but if you do not have a leak detector there is an alternative method. The air conditioner system is designed to run with oil suspended in the refrigerant to lubricate the system. Check for oily residue outside the system by inspecting all hoses, compressor, condenser, evaporator or receiver drier and replace any component that has failed.

4. Inspect Fuses - Check under dash panel and under hood power distribution center. Replace failed fuses as needed, recheck system. If the new fuse fails when reinstalled a short circuit is present and requires diagnosing with a wiring schematic, follow circuits to locate short, repair as needed and recheck system.

5. Check Temperature Control Vents - The vents inside your car are controlled by a cable, electrical servo or vacuum servo. If the temperature blend door is not functioning properly it will cause warm air from the heater to exit the vents. To check this start the car and allow the engine idle, next turn the blower motor speed on low, switch the temperature control from warm to cold while your ear is close to the vents. You should hear the door move inside the heater box as it swings from open to close. If not, insect for a vacuum leak or a shorted motor in the servo, repair the leak or replace the servo motor.

Aug 13, 2009 | 2006 Dodge Ram 3500 Truck

1 Answer

Air conditioning systems don't work


HI. I have put together some very important check points that you should use to isolate the issue that concerns this inoperable AC system.

1. Check Drive Belts - The air conditioner utilizes a drive belt that supplies power to rotate the compressor, which is basically a refrigerant pump. If the belt fails the compressor has nothing to drive it, inspect and replace as needed to restore operation. If belt is intact proceed to the next step.

2. Check for Compressor Clutch Engagement - Turn the air conditioner to the "on" position and set controls to the coldest setting. Start the engine and allow to idle. Then open the hood and inspect the clutch at the front of the compressor, is it turning? "Engaged" if so, the system has enough refrigerant to activate. If the system is low on refrigerant it will not work properly. In this case an air conditioner recharge kit is needed to recharge the system. If the system is low on refrigerant it could cycle on and off, making a ticking noise. If the compressor clutch is not turning proceed to next step.

3. Inspect for Refrigerant Leaks - If the system has a large leak and no refrigerant remains it will not activate. First test system for a static pressure charge, with the engine off attach an ac gauge to the low side pressure port and check the state of charge. Depending on outside temperature there should be between 50 psi and 80 psi. (Cool and warm). A refrigerant leak detector is needed to inspect for leak, but if you do not have a leak detector there is an alternative method. The air conditioner system is designed to run with oil suspended in the refrigerant to lubricate the system. Check for oily residue outside the system by inspecting all hoses, compressor, condenser, evaporator or receiver drier and replace any component that has failed.

4. Inspect Fuses - Check under dash panel and under hood power distribution center. Replace failed fuses as needed, recheck system. If the new fuse fails when reinstalled a short circuit is present and requires diagnosing with a wiring schematic, follow circuits to locate short, repair as needed and recheck system.

5. Check Temperature Control Vents - The vents inside your car are controlled by a cable, electrical servo or vacuum servo. If the temperature blend door is not functioning properly it will cause warm air from the heater to exit the vents. To check this start the car and allow the engine idle, next turn the blower motor speed on low, switch the temperature control from warm to cold while your ear is close to the vents. You should hear the door move inside the heater box as it swings from open to close. If not, insect for a vacuum leak or a shorted motor in the servo, repair the leak or replace the servo motor.


Jul 28, 2009 | 1995 Audi 90

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