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Choking Why does using choke in cold weather improve performance?

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Hello, the reason the choke improves performance in the colder weather is, because an engine needs more fuel in the cold temp. It doesn't burn as easily as it does when the temperature is warm or after engine is warm.Please rate this answer. Thank you

Posted on Mar 04, 2009

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Rough running on acceleration all the time back fires and misses choking


Have the car scanned for diagnostic trouble codes " DTL's ". That should give you a starting point

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Jeep grand cherokee choking problem after a few minutes.


Check your idle air control valve. Sounds as though it may be the problem. The other item could be the TPS, but I doubt it because it would idle poorly all the time even after warming up.

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Hi i have a 2000 bonneville ssei supercharged 3.8 my car keeps choking up when i push on the gas pedel and on the highway on cruise at 80kms keep sputtering and get a black smoke from my exaust and...


i had a 91 gmc car, it was fuel injected &(if it was carburated) ran like the choke was stuck,i changed the thermostate sensor & relay(relay cost more)sounds like your car.the computer was getting information that the car was cold.if you can find a manual for your car check trouble shooting. i dont want to plug a company but HAYNES makes a quality manual.hpe this helps

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Engine oil capacity & type


Hello,

Visco 2000 or mobil oil, use the dipstick to check do not let it be too full.

The type specified by the vehicle manufacturer in your owner's manual. For most passenger car and light truck gasoline engines today, it's any oil that meets the American Petroleum Institutes "SH" rating.
As for the viscosity of oil to use, most new engines today require a multiviscosity 5W-30 oil for all-round driving. The lighter 5W-30 oils contain friction reducing additives that help improve fuel economy, and also allow the oil to quickly reach critical upper valvetrain components when a cold engine is first started. Most engine wear occurs immediately after a cold start, so it's important to have oil that is thin enough to circulate easily -- especially at cold temperatures.
For older engines and ones that are driven at sustained highways speeds during hot weather, 10W-30 or 10W-40 is a good choice. Heavier multiviscosity oils such as 20W-40 are for high rpm, high-load applications primarily and are not recommended for cold weather driving.
Straight weight 30W and 40W oils aren't very popular anymore, but some diehards insist on using them. They say the thicker oil holds up better under high temperature (which it does), increases oil pressure and reduces oil consumption in high mileage engines. But straight 30W and 40W oils are too thick for cold weather and may make an engine hard to start. They may also be too thick to provide adequate start-up lubrication to critical upper valvetrain components during cold weather. So switching to a straight 20W oil would be necessary for cold weather driving. Straight 10W oil can also improve cold starting, but is very thin and should only be used in sub-zero climates. A multiviscosity 10W-30 or 10W-40 will provide the same cold starting benefits of a 10W oil and the high temperature protection of a 30W or 40W oil.
For the ultimate in high temperature protection, durability and all-round performance, synthetic oils are the way to go. Unfortunately, most synthetic oils cost up to three times as much as ordinary petroleum-based oils. They cost more because synthetics are manmade rather than refined from petroleum. But this improves their performance in virtually every aspect:
  • Superior temperature resistance. Synthetics can safely handle higher operating temperatures without oxidizing (burning) or breaking down. The upper limit for most mineral based oils is about 250 to 300 degrees F. Synthetics can take up to 450 degrees F. or higher. This makes synthetics well-suited for turbo applications as well as high rpm and high output engine applications.
  • Better low temperature performance. Synthetics flow freely at subzero temperatures, pouring easily at -40 or -50 degrees F. where ordinary oils turn to molasses. This makes for easier cold starts and provides faster upper valvetrain lubrication during the first critical moments when most engine wear occurs.
  • Better engine performance. Synthetics tend to be more slippery than their petroleum-based counterparts, which improves fuel economy, cuts frictional horsepower losses and helps the engine run cooler. The difference isn't great, but it can make a noticeable difference.
  • Longer oil change intervals. Because synthetics resist oxidation and viscosity breakdown better than ordinary motor oils, some suppliers say oil change intervals can be safely extended -- in some cases stretched to as much as 25,000 miles. Such claims are justified by the fact that synthetics don't break down or sludge up as fast as ordinary mineral-based oils do in use. CAUTION: For vehicles under warranty, extending the normal change interval is not recommended because failing to follow the OEM's maintenance schedule can void your warranty.
    Synthetics are available in the same grades as ordinary motor oils (5W-30, 5W-20 and 10W-30) as well as "extended" grades such as 15W-50 and even 5W-50.
    There are also lower-cost synthetic "blends" that combine synthetic and petroleum-based oils in the same container. But you can do your own blend to save money by simply substituting a quart or two of synthetic oil for conventional oil when you change oil. Synthetics are compatible with conventional motor oils.
    Who should use a synthetic oil? The premium-priced oil is best for:
    • Turbocharged or supercharged engines
    • Performance or high output engines
    • Vehicles used for towing (especially during hot weather)
    • Vehicles that are operated in extremely cold or hot climates
    • Anyone who wants the ultimate in lubrication and protection

Take care and good luck

Dec 03, 2010 | 2008 Nissan Xterra

1 Answer

I have an 1986 dodge aries se station wagon that is having some problems. The engine sputters out when ever it is chilly out. No matter what the engine tempt is it seems to be choking when its even...


Sounds to me like the automatic choke assembly is out of adjustment or not functioning correctly. On a cold day, you will note that the choke assembly is closed, try manually opening it and proping it open to see if this improves the problem. If your not sure where the choke assembly is, I suggest you buy a Hanes Repair Manual for this vehicle from your local auto parts store to help troubleshoot this problem.

Oct 10, 2009 | 1986 Dodge Aries 4 Door

2 Answers

2002 Nissan Altima 3.5 "Choking & Jerking"


I just had the same problem with my '02 altima SE.
Took it to Buckeye Nissan in Hilliard OH. and they had to replace the two crank sensors which.
The sensors themselves were about $44.00 a piece, but w/labor about $300.00 was the total. Hope this helps.....Now if I can just get the heater working!

Oct 08, 2009 | 2002 Nissan Altima

1 Answer

Car can stall in warm weather


Most likely if it is temperature related you may have a temperature sensor that is failing. The sensor may not be reacting properly to the actual temperature and causing the engine to run rich in warmer weather when a richer setting is not required.
You could have a sticking injector or sticking EGR valve or a faulty TPS switch, all can cause a rich condition and a poor running engine.
Is the service engine light on or come on at some point?
I would start by having the car scanned for trouble codes. You can have the scanned at no cost to you at your local Auto Zone or Advance Auto Parts. Write the codes down and respond back.

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1 Answer

My 2000 mitsubishi mirage check engine lights on and it choking when im in idle wants to konk out but doesnt


Spray some carb cleaner ta the fuel intake to see if it improves, if yes then add some carb cleaner fluid in the fuel line to clear the nozzles..sodeep

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1 Answer

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try disconnecting vacuum advance tube from the distributor,block it off and see how the car reacts.you may have to do it to both if it has 2 Could also have a vacuum leak somewhere around the intake system

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