Question about 2004 Ford F150

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Oil on the in side of the brake drum

When I change my brakes I find oil on the in side of the brake drum. What would cause the problem.

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  • mike loshbough
    mike loshbough May 11, 2010

    hum it has rear disc not wheel cylinder nice guess

  • yadayada
    yadayada May 11, 2010

    a axle seal leak.

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2 Answers

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Or a leaking wheel cyclinder

Posted on Mar 04, 2009

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You either have a brake wheel cylinder leaking or an axel seal leaking.Either one will cause the brake to lock up on hard applications once the shoes have become contaminated.

Posted on Mar 04, 2009

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1 Answer

The rear brakes on my 1998 PONTIAC GRAND AM are extremely grabby what is causing this


first response is --no brake pads/ linings
second response is ( if drum brakes ---oil on the linings
third response is-- brakes incorrectly assembled
fourth response , brake drums ( if drums ) are oval shaped and need replacing

Mar 10, 2016 | Pontiac Grand Am Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My right rear wheel on a 1999 dodge caravan locked up


There are a few things that can cause this,you will have to remove the wheel and brake drum to inspect it . Seized wheel bearing, grease or oil on brake linings,seized cable,if hydraulic seized wheel cylinder pistons. If the linings have oil or grease on them replace them on both sides for even braking.

Jan 05, 2016 | 1999 Dodge Grand Caravan

1 Answer

Whats happening when 2001 s10 right rear brake grabs first when brakes applied


check for a leaking wheel cylinder on this side as this can cause sticking and grabbing. it could also be an axle seal leak and differential oil has gotten on the brake shoe and drum. incorrect brake adjustment on this side.

Aug 21, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I just changed front and back brakes to much play in brake peddle


Adjust the rear drum brakes if equipped, too much distance between the rear drum lining and the drum will cause this, if it has all 4 disc brakes better look at the master cylinder for a leak internally.

Jul 14, 2014 | Toyota Pickup Cars & Trucks

4 Answers

My left break keeps locking up when i stop


Not likely, but if you take it off and to a shop they can check it for roundness with a gauge for a nominal cost. If one drum needs replacing, it is good practice to replace both at the same time.
When the drum is off, you may spot the problem with the brakes not retracting properly. Check for broken brake springs, some holder that has come loose, the emergency cable sticking on that side. Take both drums off and compare both sides of the brakes to look for problems. See if the self adjusters threads appear to be about even on both sides. The left side may need adjusting more inward if it looks to be spread further than the right side.

Jan 29, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

Brake fluid leak on rear drum


If you have no evidence of leaking outside the drum, most likely your brake piston is leaking or the drive shaft seal is leaking. Pull off the drum and look for the piston which spreads the two brake pads normally situated at the top. Inspect for leaks. If the fluid is thin, it is most likely brake fluid. If it is heavier like oil and really stinks, it is gear oil from a leaking seal.

Sep 07, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

1994 c2500 rear drum removal problems


Hi,

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The information set forth below is the approach used in our shop.

There is a high probability that one of the conditions set forth below is causing your drum to bind as you try to remove it. The simplest solution is to use your brake spoon develop the maximum amount of spacing between the brake shoe and the drum.

If that doesn't work, on occasion we've had to use a chisel or a cutting torch to remove the drum. It is very seldom that such drastic measures must be taken but it has happened.

Surface/Heat Checks/Cracked Drum/Out-Of-Round Drum Brake drums act as a heat sink. They absorb heat and dissipate it into the air. As drums wear from normal use or are machined, their cooling surface area is reduced and their operating temperatures increase. Structural strength also reduces. This leads to overdistortion, which causes some of the drum conditions covered here.

Scored Drum Surface
A scored drum surface shows a scored drum surface. The most common cause of this condition is buildup of brake dust and dirt between the brake lining and drum. A glazed brake lining, hardened by high heat or in some cases by very hard inferior grade brake lining, can also groove the drum surface. Excessive lining wear that exposes the rivet head or shoe steel will score the drum surface. If the grooves are not too deep, the drum can be turned.
f45-17.gif Example of a scored brake drum. Courtesy of Wagner Brake Products. Bell-mouthed Drum
Bell-mouthed drum shows a distortion due to extreme heat and braking pressure. It occurs mostly on wide drums and is caused by poor support at the outside of the drum. Full drum-to-lining contact cannot be achieved and fading can be expected. Drums must be turned.
f45-18.gif Example of a bell-mouhed brake drum. Courtesy of Wagner Brake Products.

Concave Drum
A concave drum exhibits an excessive wear pattern in the center area of the drum brake surface. Extreme braking pressure can distort the shoe platform so braking pressure is concentrated at the center of the drum.
f45-19.gif Examples of concave and convex brake drums. Courtesy of Wagner Brake Products.

Convex Drum
A convex drum exhibits excessive wear at the closed end of the drum. It is the result of excessive heat or an oversized drum, which allows the open end of the drum to distort.

Hard Spots On The Drum
This condition in the cast-iron surface, sometimes called chisel spots or islands of steel, results from a change in metallurgy caused by braking heat. Chatter, pulling, rapid wear, hard pedal, and noise occur. These spots can be removed by grinding. However, only the raised surfaces are removed, and they can reappear when heat is applied. The drum must be replaced.

Threaded Drum Surface
An extremely sharp or chipped tool bit or a lathe that turns too fast can result in a threaded drum surface. This condition can cause a snapping sound during brake application as the shoes ride outward on the thread, then snap back. To avoid this, recondition drums using a rounded tool and proper lathe speed. Check the edge of the drum surface around the mounting flange side for tool marks indicating a previous rebore. If the drum has been rebored, it might have worn too thin for use. Check the diameter.

Heat Checks
Heat checks are visible, unlike hard spots that do not appear until the machining of the drum. Extreme operating temperatures are the major cause. The drum might also show a bluish/gold tint, which is a sign of high temperatures. Hardened carbide lathe bits or special grinding attachments are available through lathe manufacturers to service these conditions. Excessive damage by heat checks or hard spots requires drum replacement.
f45-20.gif Example of a heat checked and over-heated brake drum. Courtesy of Wagner Brake Products.

Cracked Drum
Cracks in the cast-iron drum are caused by excessive stress. They can be anywhere but usually are in the vicinity of the bolt circle or at the outside of the flange. Fine cracks in the drums are often hard to see and, unfortunately, often do not show up until after machining. Nevertheless, should any cracks appear, no matter how small, the drum must be replaced.

Out-Of-Round Drum
Drums with eccentric distortion might appear fine to the eye but can cause pulling, grabbing, and pedal vibration or pulsation. An out-of-round or egg-shaped condition is often caused by heating and cooling during normal brake operation. Out-of-round drums can be detected before the drum is removed by adjusting the brake to a light drag and feeling the rotation of the drum by hand. After removing the drum, gauge it to determine the amount of eccentric distortion. Drums with this defect should be machined or replaced.
f45-21.gif Measure the inside diameter of the drum in several spots to determine out-of-roundness.

An out of round or tapered drum prevents accurate brake shoe adjustment prevents not only difficult removal but also can cause excessive wear of other brake parts; excessive tire wear; and, a pulsating brake pedal.

All the best

Ben

Jun 15, 2011 | Chevrolet 2500 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Back brakes lock up


There are several conditions that can cause this to happen. You want to start out by checking the parking brake assembly, particularly the cable for the right rear or passenger side brake. Make certain the cable moves freely when the park brake is applied and released completely when the park brake is disengaged.
Next, remove the rear brake drum and check for any oil, grease or brake fluid contamination of the brake shoes. Any contamination of this type will cause the brake to hang up when applied.
If that checks good, make sure the brake system hardware if working properly and components have not dislodged from there installed position be sure there are no broken return springs or very rusted and weak components.
Generally what happens is a wheel cylinder begins to leak, contaminated the shoes and cause them to become sticky when the shoe contacts the drum or a return spring breaks or comes off for various reasons.
Check it out and let me know.
Regards,

Oct 04, 2009 | 1997 Pontiac Sunfire

1 Answer

Wheel is locking up on 88 ranger


U need to pull the rear drum off to see what's going on. Check to see if the brakes and drum look wet. There may be a leak in the brake cylinder or axle seal. The leaking oil/brake fluid can cause what u describe. Does this happen all the time, or only after using the brakes for a while? If there is some type of fluid leak, it needs to be fixed, and your should replace the brake shoes and all hardware. Let me know what u find, or if u need further help.

Jan 07, 2009 | 1988 Ford Ranger

3 Answers

REAR BRAKE DRUM WON,T COME OFF


I just had a similar problem with 1997 Hardbody.

Cause: The E-brake cable was binding up inside the drum causing the e-brake not to disengage - despite the handle being released inside the cab.

Solution: Look for 2 threaded holes in the drum. Insert two bolts and crank these bolts in. They will eventually work to push the drum off the wheel. Be careful to go slow and evenly (don't snap off the bolts!). Penetrating oil and mallet will help the process.

Sep 29, 2008 | 1999 Nissan Pathfinder

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