Question about 2002 Suzuki XL-7

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Directions on replacing the oxygen sensor

I am in need of directions on how to replace the oxygen sensor on the vehicle. I am told it is Bank 1 Sensor 1 and I am looking for instructions to replace this myself.

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  • Anonymous Apr 11, 2009

    where can I find the o2 sensor on a Suzuki XL7

  • Anonymous Apr 26, 2009

    i have the same problem but which is port one bank one? driver or passenger side sensor?

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Start at the exsoust manifolds.follow it back and you will find the o/2 sensors. I would spray them with WD 40 before you try to take them out. most of them can be very tight and hard to get to. make sure that you unpulg them and check the wires to make sure they are on.

Posted on Mar 03, 2009

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Where is the oxygen sensor located on a 1999 GMC Yukon with a 350.


You have four O2 sensors in your vehicle. Bank 1 and Bank 2. Typically it is Bank One, sensor Two that goes out from minor oil leaks on your engine. Here are a couple diagrams. Lay down behind your right front tire and look up. Look for cracked wires or burnt areas by connection. You can't always tell by looking. Easy to replace and fairly cheap.
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Feb 08, 2015 | 1999 GMC Yukon

Tip

Which Oxygen Sensor Is It?


There are many inquiries online about which oxygen sensor to change. Oxygen sensor failure codes are very common on a lot of vehicles. With all of today's vehicles having at least two oxygen sensors and many having three or four of them, it can be a little confusing as to which one is causing the problem.

Before we get into which sensor is which, we need to have a little discussion about oxygen sensor fault codes. There are several different types of oxygen sensor fault codes. Here are just some of the most common ones:

P0135 "Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit Bank1 Sensor 1"
P0141 "Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit Bank 1 Sensor 2"
P0147 "Oxygen Sensor Circuit Bank 1 Sensor 3"
P0152 "Oxygen Sensor Voltage High Bank 2 Sensor 1"
P0159 "Oxygen Sensor Slow Response Bank 2 Sensor 2"
P0171 "Oxygen Sensor Lean Sensor 1 Bank 1"
P0172 "Oxygen Sensor Lean Sensor 1 Bank 2"
P0174 "Oxygen Sensor Rich Sensor 1 Bank 1"
P0175 "Oxygen Sensor Rich Sensor 1 Bank 2"

There are many more possible oxygen sensor codes, but I only listed these to make my point. Many times the oxygen sensor code is NOT caused by the oxygen sensor itself. "Lean" or "Rich" oxygen sensor codes (i.e. P0171, P0174) are usually caused by something other than the oxygen sensor. Something is wrong, causing the engine to run lean (not enough fuel or too much air) or causing the engine to run rich (too much fuel or not enough air). In these cases, replacing the oxygen sensor will not fix a thing. (That is, unless you are trying to fix your bank account from having too high of a balance!) The new oxygen sensor will just set the same code as the original one. This is because the oxygen sensor is not CAUSING the problem, it is only REPORTING the problem.

High voltage codes (like P0152 above) can be caused by the oxygen sensor wires being shorted to another wire inside the wiring harness. Sometimes these codes are caused by bad grounds where some other component is trying to ground through the oxygen sensor circuit. Again, replacing the oxygen sensor will not fix this! In short, the problem needs to be diagnosed before running out and buying an oxygen sensor.

Just because a fault code has "Oxygen Sensor" or "O2 Sensor" or "O2S" in its description does not necessarily mean that an oxygen sensor needs to be replaced. Many do-it-yourselfers believe that all there is to fixing the car is to hook it to the "magic box", collect the fault codes and replace the parts the computer tells you to replace. There is nothing further from the truth.

Fault codes only point you toward which SYSTEM is failing. The system must be diagnosed to find the CAUSE of the failure. If this is not done properly, it will only result in wasting a bunch of your money. This is what you were trying to avoid by doing it yourself!

So, after reading all of the above, if you think you still want to replace an oxygen sensor, but don't know which one; here is how to figure it out:

Oxygen sensors are always numbered like this:

Bank 1 Sensor 1
Bank 2 Sensor 1
Bank 1 Sensor 2
Bank 2 Sensor 2

Some manufacturers use a kind of shorthand that reads different, but means the same thing:

Sensor 1/1 or O2s 1/1
Sensor 2/1 or O2s 2/1
Sensor 1/2 or O2s 1/2
Sensor 2/2 or O2s 2/2

Bank 1 is always the side of the engine where cylinder #1 is located and, of course, Bank 2 is the opposite side.
On a 4 cylinder engine, there is only one bank and it is always referred to as Bank 1. The exception to the 4 cylinder rule is on certain 4 cylinder engines (specifically, some Toyotas) there are two catalytic converters used. In this case, Bank 1 sensors will still be in the pipe for the catalyst that is connected to cylinder #1 and Bank 2 sensors will be in the other one.

Sensor 1 is always the "upstream" sensor (the one located BEFORE the catalytic converter).
Sensor 2 is always the "downstream" sensor (the one that is located AFTER the catalytic converter).
Sensor 3 refers to the ONLY "downstream" sensor where there are two sensors before the catalyst and only one after the catalyst. On very few vehicles the reference to this reads "Bank 1 Sensor 3".

If you do not know where cylinder #1 is, then you need to get a diagram of the firing order for your engine. Just post a question on FixYa.com and make sure you give the YEAR, MAKE, MODEL, and ENGINE SIZE of your vehicle and one or more of our experts will be happy to tell you how to find cylinder #1.

- DTTECH
ASE Certified Master Automobile Technician


Also check out this article by dttech: What Else Could Be Wrong?

on Apr 29, 2011 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How many o2 sensors are on a 1999 Silverado 5.3


The 1999 5.3 V8 engine had 4 oxygen sensors. There are two catalytic converters on this engine, one on the driver side of the engine, and one on the passenger side of the engine. This is important to know, as the number of oxygen sensors is directly related to the number of catalytic converters on the vehicle. Driver side is referred to as Bank 1, passenger side is referred to as Bank 2. This is very important to know when looking up replacement oxygen sensors. There is one oxygen sensor in front of, or before the catalytic converter, usually referred to as a pre-catalyst O2 sensor. There is also one behind, or after the catalytic converter, usually referred to as a post-catalyst oxygen sensor. So, you have two oxygen sensors on Bank 1, and two oxygen sensors on Bank 2, for a grand total of 4 oxygen sensors.

Oct 03, 2013 | 1999 BMW 318 ti

1 Answer

I just replaced both o2 sensors pre-cat converter and can't clear the service engine light on an 01 yukon. I tried pulling the fuse, disconnect battery with no luck. In research I noticed that the dealer...


I think you need Bosch for that vehicle. here is a rundown how it helps


Every automobile manufactured after the 1980s is equipped with an oxygen sensor. This component measures the ratio of air and gasoline in the engine and feeds the data to the vehicle's computer. With an oxygen sensor, your engine runs more efficiently and produces as few emissions as possible. If your car's running with a busted oxygen sensor, you better get a new one before your engine's efficiency takes a nosedive and your gas bills skyrocket. We know that looking for the right replacement oxygen sensor can be very tricky, that's why we've come up with a guide for you to keep in mind when shopping for a new oxygen sensor.
Which oxygen sensor should you buy?
There are a lot of questions about which oxygen sensor to replace. In fact, failures are common among cars especially when the wrong sensor is installed. With today's automobiles equipped with at least two, or even three or four oxygen sensors, it can be very confusing as to which one is not working correctly. There are probably a lot of sensor codes to choose from and here's a tip to help you sense the right oxygen sensor.
Oxygen sensors are always numbered this way:
Bank 1 Sensor 1
Bank 2 Sensor 1
Bank 1 Sensor 2
Bank 2 Sensor 2
Other manufacturers code their oxygen sensors this way, which is why it can sometimes be very confusing. However, they all mean the same:
Sensor 1/1 or O2s 1/1
Sensor 2/1 or O2s 2/1
Sensor 1/2 or O2s 1/2
Sensor 2/2 or O2s 2/2
Now here's a detailed list to know which is which:
  • Bank 1 is located at the side of the engine where cylinder #1 is found as well.
  • Bank 2 is on the opposite side of Bank 1.
  • On a 4-cylinder engine, there is only one bank that's called Bank 1.
  • Sensor 1 is the upstream sensor located before the catalytic converter.
  • Sensor 2 is the downstream sensor located after the catalytic converter.
  • Sensor 3 is the only downstream sensor in situations where there are two sensors before the catalytic converter and only one after it. On other cars, this is read as Bank 1 Sensor 3.
With these detailed tips on how to sense the right oxygen sensor, you'd be sure to buy the right replacement part at your store. Be sure to purchase one from a trusted brand to avoid any complications you might experience with ones that are bought from local junkyards BEST OF LUCK

Aug 26, 2013 | Dodge Grand Caravan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

What does the oxygen sensors look like in a 2003 Chevy Venture (warner Brothers Edition) ? How many are there? Where are they located? Can you show a picture of them in place? How do i replace them? Chevy...


There should be an O2 sensor before and after the catalytic converter on your vehicle, so it will have 2 sensors. You'll need a 7/8" open end wrench or an O2 sensor socket to replace them.

It'll look something like this: http://www.carsteering.com/data/all_images/48-01718.jpg

May 20, 2011 | 2003 Chevrolet Venture Passanger

1 Answer

1995 Cadi SLS Codes, P0030 & P0036, Ckt Fuse or Relay Defective, checked fuse ok, where is relay located?


Hi there,

P0030 = HO2S Heater Control Circuit (Bank 1 Sensor 1) - No.1 Heated Oxygen sensor on bank 1.
P0036 = HO2S Heater Control Circuit (Bank 1 Sensor 2) - No. 2 Heated Oxygen sensor on bank 1

For both of these to trigger on the same bank, means most likely an Open or Short to Ground condition (somewhere on the Bank 1 circuit) stopping the HO2 sensors from reaching their working temperature.

Check the following in this order:

1) Using a multimeter, check 'continuity' of the Oxygen circuit FUSE terminals (don't rely on visual inspection alone) or replace fuse with a known good one.
2) Check for moisture getting into both oxygen sensor connector terminals (bank 1).
3) Check for good connection at Oxygen sensors (bank 1).
3) Have both heated oxygen sensors on Bank 1 tested (ensure their values are to specification).
4) Check HO2 pin-outs of the PCM for correct voltage.

Only replace the HO2 sensors as a last resort (if out of spec).

Then engine department relay centre & fusebox location is behind the washer bottle, but I believe the HO2 sensors are connected direct to the PCM, not a relay.

Cheers,


"If this has helped you in any way, please rate this solution"

May 07, 2011 | Cadillac Seville Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

What is p1148


P1148 - Closed Loop Control Function Bank 1
This mean that the closed loop control function for bank 1 does not operate even when vehicle is driving in the specified condition.

The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) or Electronic Control Module(ECM) monitor the function of the Front Oxygen (O2) sensor or Air/Fuel (A/F) sensor by comparing the signal with the Rear O2 sensor.

Symptoms:
- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)

Possible causes:
- Harness or connectors Front Oxygen (O2) sensor or Air/Fuel (A/F) sensor 1 circuit is open or shorted.
- Front Oxygen (O2) sensor or Air/Fuel (A/F) sensor bank 1
- Front Oxygen (O2) sensor or Air/Fuel (A/F) sensor bank 1 heater

Possible solution:
- Repair harness or connector. If repair is needed
- Replaced Front Oxygen (O2) sensor or Air/Fuel (A/F) sensor bank 1


Then, possible causes are faulty harness or connectors to the air fuel ratio sensor, a faulty air fuel ratio sensor (1) or faulty air fuel ratio sensor (1) heater. Most likely yes it is just faulty sensor. Just replace this devices and reset the stored codes.

Keep us updated.

Feb 10, 2011 | 2005 Nissan Altima

1 Answer

I have a 07 f150 4.6L V8 and I need to replace the Bank 1 sensor 1 oxygen sensor but cant figure out which sensor it is since there are 4 sensors. Where can I find a picture of the location?


Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S)- The Bank 1 Sensor 1 tells me that it's an upstream O2 sensor. The larger the number the further down the line of the exhaust it is. Removal & Installation 4.2L Engine ford-04-42-2750.gif
To Remove:
  1. Raise and safely support vehicle.
  2. Disconnect battery ground cable.
  3. Detach electrical connector from right inner fender splash shield (if necessary).
  4. Remove right inner fender splash shield (if necessary).
  5. Disconnect heated oxygen sensor electrical connector.
  6. Remove heated oxygen sensor.
To Install:
  1. Apply anti-seize lubricant to heated oxygen sensor threads.
  2. Install heated oxygen sensor. Torque to: 34 ft-lbs (46 Nm)
  3. Connect heated oxygen sensor electrical connector.
  4. Install right inner fender splash shield (if necessary).
  5. Attach electrical connector to right inner fender splash shield (if necessary).
  6. Connect battery ground cable.
  7. Lower vehicle.
4.6L and 5.4L Engines ford-04-46-2751.gif
To Remove:
  1. Raise and safely support vehicle.
  2. Disconnect battery ground cable.
  3. Disconnect heated oxygen sensor electrical connector.
  4. Remove heated oxygen sensor.
To Install:
  1. Apply anti-seize lubricant to heated oxygen sensor threads.
  2. Install heated oxygen sensor. Torque to: 34 ft-lbs (46 Nm)
  3. Connect heated oxygen sensor electrical connector.
  4. Connect battery ground cable.
  5. Lower vehicle.

Nov 07, 2010 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 2003 Kia Optima check engine light keeps coming on. I was told "Bank 1 Sensor 1" needs to be replaced. Where is Bank 1 Sensor 1?


P0130 Oxygen Sensor Circuit Malfunction - Bank 1 Sensor 1.
P0131 Oxygen Sensor Circuit Low Voltage - Bank 1 Sensor 1.
P0132 Oxygen Sensor Circuit High Voltage - Bank 1 Sensor 1.
P0133 Oxygen Sensor Circuit Slow Response - Bank 1 Sensor 1.
P0134 Oxygen Sensor Circuit No Activity detected - Bank 1 Sensor 1.
P0135 Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit Malfunction - Bank 1 Sensor 1


Jun 23, 2010 | 2003 Kia Optima

1 Answer

My check engine light has come on in my 2006 Pontiac G6 after 2 and a half years. What could possibly be wrong since I keep my car serviced and the guys had just told me that my car was in tip top shape?


P0016 - Crankshaft Position Camshaft Position Correlation Bank 1 Sensor A
P0030 - Heated Oxygen Sensor (H02S) Heater Control Circuit Bank 1 Sensor 1
P0031 - Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Heater Circuit Low Voltage Bank 1 Sensor 1
P0032 - Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Heater Circuit High Voltage Bank 1 Sensor 1
P0036 - Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Heater Control Circuit Bank 1 Sensor 2
P0037 - Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Heater Circuit Low Voltage Bank 1 Sensor 2
P0038 - Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Heater Circuit High Voltage Bank 1 Sensor 2
P0050 - Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Heater Circuit Bank 2 Sensor 1
P0051 - Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Heater Circuit Low Voltage Bank 2 Sensor 1
P0052 - Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Heater Circuit High Voltage Bank 2 Sensor 1
P0053 - HO2S Heater Resistance Bank 1 Sensor 1 (PCM)
P0054 - HO2S Heater Resistance Bank 1 Sensor 2 (PCM)
P0056 - Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Heater Circuit Bank 2 Sensor 2
P0057 - Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Heater Circuit Low Voltage Bank 2 Sensor 2
P0058 - Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Heater Circuit High Voltage Bank 2 Sensor 2
P0068 - Throttle Body Airflow Performance (PCM)
P0100 - MAF Sensor Circuit Insufficient Activity

Jun 25, 2009 | 2006 Pontiac G6

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