Question about 2003 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

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I need to replace a glow plug on my 2002 Jetta TDI.

I have a Chiltons manual and it says to disconnect the engine coolant temperature sensor, but I can't find it with the picture they provide.

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  • jrjakes Mar 03, 2009

    I did do an engine scan, I don't have the scan number but it said the #3 glow plug was bad.

  • passatsyncro May 11, 2010

    The best way to double check the glow plugs (i found) is with an ohm meter, remove top engine cover and just by the diesel pump you will see 4 small glow plug connectors. Pull straight up to disconnect all 4. Put one lead to ground and the other lead to the top of the glow plug, should be around 2 ohms or less. Measure all 4 glow plugs. let me know how it goes. There may be other issues. Also VW parts dept should know, TDI used beru glow plugs and Bosch, all 4 glow plugs should be the same make.

  • passatsyncro May 11, 2010

    Just a couple questions, why are replacing glow plug(s)? and the coolant temp sensor does not have to be disconnected. Was there an engine scan done? any code?

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I'm not sure about a 2002, but I have a 2003 and we didn't have to take off the engin coolant temp. sensor. We needed the #4 glow plug replaced and this is how we did it. We took off the motor cover by undoing the threee bolts, then there is a rubber "bar" across in front of the injectors.. pull these up one by one by holding onto the ends and there you will find the glow plugs. You will need a 10mm deep socket to undo these. We replaced the last one on the right ( thinking that it would be the #4) wrong... the firing order is 1342 but the last one one the right is not #4, so to make sure that they wore evenly we replaced all four of them. When you have tightened in the glow plug(s) make sure you put the rubber plug end on with a "snap". Replace everything that you took off and put the motor cover back on. This worked for us hopefully for you, too.

Posted on Mar 29, 2009

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I have a 2000 TDI Jetta. It turns over perfect but won't start - it wants to. Help


SOUND LIKE GLOW PLUGS NOT WORKING DUE TO FAULTY FAULTY COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR OR BLOWED GLOW PLUG FUSE OR BAD RELAY.HAVE VECHICLE CODE SCANNED TO CHECK TO MAKE SURE PRE HEATING SYSTEM WORKING CORRECTLY.CODE SCANNING WILL GIVE YOU A FAULT CODE IF YOU HAVE BAD GLOW PLUG RELAY.

Jun 27, 2011 | 2000 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

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How to test ECT sensor? 2002 jetta TDI, temperature indicator would go up and down but car was warm and hater output ok


Replace bad Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor. ECT sensor is placed in the right back side of the cylinder head on 2002 VW Jetta 1.9 TDI. See picture below:

tdisline_388.jpg

Mar 30, 2011 | 2002 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

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The diagram in my haynes manual does not show some parts that are in my 2001 jetta tdi 1.9 turbo. i ran a diognostic and it says glow plug curcuit a malfunction, i changed the plugs and tested the coolant...


In addition to the 4 primary glow plugs, the cooling system also has 3 Coolant Glow Plugs to help provide extra heat to the cooling system in order to warm-up the vehicle's interior more quickly, and enhance overall engine warm-up time. (Example - Some Mercedes diesel engines use electrical heaters in the cabin because their engine is so thermally efficient.)
Likewise, this auxiliary source of heat from the 3 Coolant Glow Plugs is necessary because of the VW 1.9 TDI engines outstanding efficiency, which wastes very little heat.


The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs are located at the end of the aluminum cylinder head (in a protruding flange) directly below the vacuum (brake booster) pump, which also connects to a coolant hose.

tdisline_301.jpg
The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs use two (underhood) relays which are monitored and controlled by the ECU. During a cold start, the vehicle's interior temperature selector switch helps the ECU choose one of three modes depending on the amount of heat required to warm-up the coolant.

For example, Coolant Glow Plug #1 can be selected to operate all by itself, or #2 and #3 can operate together as a two-some, or lastly, all three glow plugs can form a triple source of heat for maximum enhancement of engine warm-up time.

After the engine is completely warmed up and the thermostat is open, the Coolant Glow Plugs normally shut-off and remain off unless the (thermally efficent) engine cools down sufficiently to have the computer signal them to come back on to keep the engine and cabin air warm. Extensive idling times at stop lights or in the driveway are scenarios where these glow plugs are most likely to recycle on and off.

In conclusion, the period of Preglow and Afterglow is determined by the engine's coolant temperature (during a cold or hot start), which helps the ECU select a predetermined time-cycle for the combustion chamber and / or Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs to follow.

Finally, one myth that needs to be immediately debunked, is the belief that the TDI's advanced Glow Plug System is linked to the opening of the driver's side door, which is false! It is also noteworthy to mention that some earlier VW diesel glow plug systems were operated in this manner, but not so with the advanced VW Jetta 1.9 TDI engine.

Feb 23, 2011 | Volkswagen Jetta Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I have a 2002 VW Jetta and the temperature gauge keeps going up and down... Is this something to worry about ?


Replace the Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor. ECT sensor is placed in the right back side of the cylinder head on 2002 VW Jetta 1.9 TDI. See picture below:

tdisline_212.jpg

Please do rate my response. Thanks!

Feb 04, 2011 | 2002 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

1 Answer

I have a 2000 Jetta diesel. Can you tell me where the plug for the block heater is? If indeed there is one.


In addition to the 4 primary glow plugs, the cooling system also has 3 Coolant Glow Plugs to help provide extra heat to the cooling system in order to warm-up the vehicle's interior more quickly, and enhance overall engine warm-up time. (Example - Some Mercedes diesel engines use electrical heaters in the cabin because their engine is so thermally efficient.)
Likewise, this auxiliary source of heat from the 3 Coolant Glow Plugs is necessary because of the VW 1.9 TDI engines outstanding efficiency, which wastes very little heat.


The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs are located at the end of the aluminum cylinder head (in a protruding flange) directly below the vacuum (brake booster) pump, which also connects to a coolant hose.

tdisline_180.jpg


The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs use two (underhood) relays which are monitored and controlled by the ECU. During a cold start, the vehicle's interior temperature selector switch helps the ECU choose one of three modes depending on the amount of heat required to warm-up the coolant.

For example, Coolant Glow Plug #1 can be selected to operate all by itself, or #2 and #3 can operate together as a two-some, or lastly, all three glow plugs can form a triple source of heat for maximum enhancement of engine warm-up time.

After the engine is completely warmed up and the thermostat is open, the Coolant Glow Plugs normally shut-off and remain off unless the (thermally efficent) engine cools down sufficiently to have the computer signal them to come back on to keep the engine and cabin air warm. Extensive idling times at stop lights or in the driveway are scenarios where these glow plugs are most likely to recycle on and off.

In conclusion, the period of Preglow and Afterglow is determined by the engine's coolant temperature (during a cold or hot start), which helps the ECU select a predetermined time-cycle for the combustion chamber and / or Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs to follow.

Finally, one myth that needs to be immediately debunked, is the belief that the TDI's advanced Glow Plug System is linked to the opening of the driver's side door, which is false! It is also noteworthy to mention that some earlier VW diesel glow plug systems were operated in this manner, but not so with the advanced VW Jetta 1.9 TDI engine.




Please do rate my response. Thanks!

Jan 23, 2011 | 2000 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

1 Answer

Where are the three glow plugs that are used for the heater/cooling located on an 02 vw jetta 1.9L tdi?


In addition to the 4 primary glow plugs, the cooling system also has 3 Coolant Glow Plugs to help provide extra heat to the cooling system in order to warm-up the vehicle's interior more quickly, and enhance overall engine warm-up time. (Example - Some Mercedes diesel engines use electrical heaters in the cabin because their engine is so thermally efficient.)
Likewise, this auxiliary source of heat from the 3 Coolant Glow Plugs is necessary because of the VW 1.9 TDI engines outstanding efficiency, which wastes very little heat.


The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs are located at the end of the aluminum cylinder head (in a protruding flange) directly below the vacuum (brake booster) pump, which also connects to a coolant hose.

tdisline_102.jpg
The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs use two (underhood) relays which are monitored and controlled by the ECU. During a cold start, the vehicle's interior temperature selector switch helps the ECU choose one of three modes depending on the amount of heat required to warm-up the coolant.

For example, Coolant Glow Plug #1 can be selected to operate all by itself, or #2 and #3 can operate together as a two-some, or lastly, all three glow plugs can form a triple source of heat for maximum enhancement of engine warm-up time.

After the engine is completely warmed up and the thermostat is open, the Coolant Glow Plugs normally shut-off and remain off unless the (thermally efficent) engine cools down sufficiently to have the computer signal them to come back on to keep the engine and cabin air warm. Extensive idling times at stop lights or in the driveway are scenarios where these glow plugs are most likely to recycle on and off.

In conclusion, the period of Preglow and Afterglow is determined by the engine's coolant temperature (during a cold or hot start), which helps the ECU select a predetermined time-cycle for the combustion chamber and / or Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs to follow.

Finally, one myth that needs to be immediately debunked, is the belief that the TDI's advanced Glow Plug System is linked to the opening of the driver's side door, which is false! It is also noteworthy to mention that some earlier VW diesel glow plug systems were operated in this manner, but not so with the advanced VW Jetta 1.9 TDI engine.

Dec 16, 2010 | 2002 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

1 Answer

1997 Jetta: glow plugs not working. Glow plugs tested good, ne...


Before you invest in a long drawn out Glow Plug replacement etc. A little known issue occurs on the ALH TDI engines. The temperature sensor sending unit. A small blue module that plugs into the coolant hose assembly will cause a P error on the glow plugs that is nothing to do with the glow plugs at all. The part fails and sends a temp error to the engine computer. I tested all the coolant glow plugs, engine glow plugs and glow plug harness and all worked fine. One of the test procedures for the glow plugs is to undo this sensor that will force the glow plugs to come on no matter what temperature. This confirmed my GP system was functional and the sensor was bad. I purchased the part from local VW dealer for $33 US and installed and it is fine. Dependent on your model it can be square or round. The link to this part for your car is http://www.partsgeek.com/catalog/1997/volkswagen/jetta/body_electrical/water_temperature_sender.html

Be sure to have VW Pentosin coolant on hand to refill coolant system as you will lose quite a bit when removing this part. It is located slightly behind the coolant glow plug assembly.. This is the round ones not the ones on the engine block at top.

Be sure that when you replace it you put in a new rubber gasket seal.. its a round rubber seal that should come with your new part. Dont reuse the old one or you will have a leak.

There is a c-clip that holds this in the hole you slide that clip off and wiggle the sensor out. Coolant will run out of the hole, so do this outside. The sensor is easily pulled out. You will need to insert the new part in teh same hole with new rubber gasket and replace c clip. Then plug in wiring harness and you should be good to go.

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1 Answer

Temperature sensor causing check engine indicator to come on...how do I change it how do I change a glow plug


The temperature sensor/ECT/ is black squire 4 pins sensor with pinlock.Before changing ensure there is not pressure in engine coolant system by opening engine coolant tank.Be very carefull ! If the engine is on operation temperature there is about 1bar pressure.If so open the cup of the tank slowly and wait the pressure going out.Pse note when you pullout the sensor the O-ring always stayng in.Take it out before fitting the new one.

Apr 25, 2010 | 2002 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

1 Answer

WHERE IS THE SENSOR LOCATED?


This is a known problem. The temp sensors go bad every so often. VW recognized this a few years back, updated the sensor and accordingly changed the colour from brown to green. oops.... They still go bad. The sensor is on the drivers side of the engine, on the back of the head in what looks like the thermostat housing. If you have a man trans there's a set of glow plugs commin out of it. This is the only temp sensor on the TDI. There's a plastic horseshoe clip (the dealer should have offer you one when you bought the sensor) you have to pop out, then wiggle the sensor until it comes out. MAKE SURE THE OLD O-RING COMES OUT, this will make instaling the new sensor much easier and will prevent your all your coolant from leaking out.... Yah, I seen it done, not good. Worst part is you can't see what you are dooing so good but its fairly simple. Good luck and happy motoring

Dec 09, 2009 | 2002 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

1 Answer

2002 Jetta TDI check engine light


very common for the harness that plugs onto the glow plugs to have too much resistance it will still work but will set codes

Mar 23, 2009 | 2002 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

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