Question about 1993 Honda Civic 4 Door

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Ignition Module How do i get to the ignition module under distributor cap

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  • avessmith467 Feb 26, 2009

    well i surely dont see it

  • yadayada
    yadayada May 11, 2010

    the module is on the outside of the distributor, so what is it u want to change?

  • yadayada
    yadayada May 11, 2010

    remove the cap

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The module is INSIDE of the distibutor.

Disconnect the Battery, remove the distributor cap, then the rotor, then the leak cover.

The ignition coil has a little spring at the top and is held in by two large screw-bolts.

The ignition control module has 3 wires attached to the top and one on the side. It is held in with two screw-bolts and should come right out.


Posted on Feb 27, 2009

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1 Answer

Ignition not firing


Do you have fuel, is your fuel pump working. If you do not have any spark at all, have you been able to check to see if you have power to your distributor. If so and you do have some then it might be either your ignition coil, pick up coil or your ignition control module. Your pick up coil in in your distributor under the plate. The coil is on top of the distributor cap. The ignition module is right under the cap where all your distributor wires connect to. Some part houses can test your ignition module and let you know if good or bad. Good luck.

Mar 22, 2014 | 1992 GMC Sierra K1500

1 Answer

I HAVE A 95 BLAZER WITH NO SPARK , CHANGED ALL COMPONETS I COULD FIND , STILL NO SPARK , NOW WHAT DO I DO


Could be the ignition module. It is located on distributor under rotor . Unscrew distributor cap and flip out of the way, leaving spark plug wires attached. Pull rotor off and remove electrical wires on both ends of ignition module. unbolt ignition module and remove. Make sure you put the grease on the metal bottom side of ignition module to disipate the heat that is generated, before you install new ignition module, if you want it to last.Good Luck.

Jan 03, 2011 | 1995 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

Getting spark and fuel and did a tune up and put new injectors in there but the car cranks but wont start and it is 1988 corvette


The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.

Sep 25, 2010 | 1988 Chevrolet Corvette

2 Answers

Trying to locate the ignition module for chevy blazer s10 1994


Ignition module sits in the ignition distributor, remove distributor cap, there will be two elec. harness plugs, the one with two wire's is for the pick up coil, the other one is for the ignition module, just unscrew module out of distributor and install new one.

Sep 23, 2010 | 1994 Chevrolet S-10 Blazer

4 Answers

How to replace an ignition rotor to a 1988 Ford Escort


Your vehicle may be equipped with either of the following ignition systems, depending on the year and engine combination:
* 1981-82 1.3L and 1.6L engines: Dura Spark II Ignition System
* 1982-85 1.6L Non-EFI and 1986 1.9L Non-EFI engines: Thick Film Ignition I (TFI-I) System
* 1983-90 1.6L EFI and 1.9L EFI engines: Thick Film Ignition IV (TFI-IV) System

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Remove the distributor from the engine.
  3. Place the distributor assembly on a workbench.
  4. Remove the two TFI ignition module retaining screws.
  5. Pull the right side of the module down the distributor mounting flange and then back up to disengage the module terminals from the connector in the distributor base. The module may then be pulled toward the flange and away from the distributor.
Do not attempt to lift the module from the mounting surface, except as explained in Step 3, as the pins will break at the distributor module connector.


To install:
  1. Coat the baseplate of the TFI ignition module uniformly with a 1 / 32 in. (0.8mm) of silicone dielectric compound WA-10 or equivalent.
  2. Position the module on the distributor base mounting flange. Carefully position the module toward the distributor bowl and engage the three connector pins securely.
  3. Install the retaining screws. Tighten to 15-35 inch lbs. (1.7-4.0 Nm), starting with the upper right screw.
  4. Install the distributor into the engine. Install the cap and wires.
  5. Reconnect the negative battery cable.
  6. Recheck the initial timing. Adjust the timing, if necessary.

Hope helps.

Sep 10, 2010 | 1988 Ford Escort EXP

2 Answers

No spark from spark plug wires I think it may be the distributor cap or interior parts under cap like rotor and condensor but dont want to change parts thats are fine i replaced the plugs but still no...


There wrere two types of HEI (High Energy Ignition) distributors used by GM in 1985, one was the original design with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap, and the second had the coil mounted seperate from the distributor and used a coil wire.

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also if the coil is seperate from the distributor that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require any further assistance.


GM HEI Ignition Coil (Mounted In Distributor Cap Type)
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Jul 30, 2010 | 1985 Chevrolet Chevy

1 Answer

My1998 chevy blazer only runs for a few seconds. I replace,fuel pump,filter,plugs,wires,injectors, brain box,cap,rootor.lots of gass in line.what do you think?ITS LIKE A RELAY OR SOMETHING IS KEEPING THE...


It would seem like a problem with the ECU or the fuel pump, but the common link between those two systems is the ignition module that is located on the distributor under the distributor cap, and that module is actually responsible for the fuel pump signal to run the fuel pump, the dwell signal to cause the ignition coil to fire, and also the signal that the ECU uses to time and fire the injectors, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto parts stores.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Jun 17, 2010 | 1998 Chevrolet Blazer

2 Answers

Will start and run but if u turn it off 4 a min it wont start back up new fuel pump filter plugs wires


That problem is most likely the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove it and have it tested for free at most auto part stores.

The ignition module could also have been damaged by a faulty ignition coil or a damaged distributor cap that allowed secondary voltage to flow over the ignition module, or a shorted pick-up coil inside of the distributor could also have caused the ignition module to malfunction, and in that case you should replace the distributor. (if the ignition module does test out to be alright then the pick-up coil is the next likely culprit)

Be sure that if you purchase a new ignition module that it does come with either a silicone grease, or a die-electric compound, and be very certain that you completely cover the metal mounting contact area under the ignition module with that silicone grease or die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will overheat without it, and be very careful that you do not over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Be sure that you also clean off the mounting surface for the ignition module on the inside of the distributor very well before you install the ignition module, and if installing the old module back into the distributor be sure to obtain either silicone grease or a die-electric compound for it.

Jun 08, 2010 | 1988 Chevrolet Celebrity

2 Answers

1989 GMC engine turns great , no spark at coil or plugs, had coil tested and repalced- new rotor and cap. not sure where to go next


Check your fuses (ECM) and also recheck your wire leads to the coil. Your ICM (ignition control Module) may also be bad, it's located in your distributor under the rotor. You can have that tested also to make sure it's working 100%, there common to go bad from corrosion caused by condensation under the distributor cap.
Thank you for using Fixya and good luck.

Mar 20, 2010 | 1989 GMC K1500

4 Answers

I want to replace spark plugs (8) and wires on my '84 GMC pickup


get a 20 dollar haynes or chiltons manuel and find the module and coil. always change the ignition module and coil every 4 no more than -5 years to be safe.

Feb 10, 2010 | GMC Sierra 2500 Cars & Trucks

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