Question about 1995 Dodge Caravan

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The a/c system does not cool. There is enough refrigerant inside.

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  • yadayada
    yadayada May 11, 2010

    does the compressor run?

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If the a/c is charged good and the controls is working right I would say the air conditioner pump is bad. I would recheck every thing if it looks good and you will need to change the pump and recharge th a/c .

Posted on Feb 25, 2009

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Blowed head gasket on Hyundai elantria head checked out ok put back together now won't start motor got hot enough to melt plug wires and radiator my daughter's care


You forgot to fill the cooling system didn't you? Or at best, you didn't 'burp' the system and get the air out. Perhaps not enough oil, which also cools?

If it was hot enough to melt the plug wires on the outside I dread to think what the valve or pistons look like. If it melted plastic on the outside, it must be hot enough to melt metal inside.

Dec 07, 2015 | Hyundai Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I used a small can of r 134a in my 2007 Ford 500 still not getting cold. What next?


Some things to check:

1. Is the compressor running?

2. Is the suction (where you added the refrigerant) line cold or
at least cool to the touch?

3. Is the system set to cooling inside the vehicle?

If you had to add refrigerant, there could be a leak somewhere. One small can of refrigerant is not enough if the system is empty. It will take around 5-6 one pound cans. However, the system should should be leak tested otherwise the newly added refrigerant will leak out.

Jul 17, 2015 | Ford Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

2003 BMW 325i a/c compressor won't turn on


either low gas or a the compressor soloniod /clutch packed up their the two most common causes

Dec 19, 2012 | 2003 BMW 325

1 Answer

2007 ford KA blowing hot air


see this causes and fix it. God bless you
Compressor Checks
checkmark.gif Start with the compressor. Does it engage when you turn on the A/C?
If so, the compressor is working and the A/C system probably contains enough refrigerant to make cold air, so the problem is inside the HVAC unit. Replace the motor that controls the blend air door (this is a difficult job and best left to a professional since it involves tearing apart the HVAC unit -- about an 8 to 10 hour job!).
If the compressor does not engage when you turn on the A/C, see if it will run by jumping the compressor clutch wire directly to the battery (use a fused jumper wire). If the compressor works when you jump it, and the A/C blows cold air, the system contains refrigerant and the fault is likely a bad A/C compressor clutch relay or a bad clutch cycling switch or pressure switch.
If the compressor does not engage when you jump it, the problem is a bad compressor clutch.
If the clutch engages but the compressor does not turn (the belt will start to slip and squeal), the compressor is locked up and you need a new compressor.
If the compressor clutch engages and turns the compressor, but the A/C still does not blow cold air, the system is probably low on refrigerant and needs to be recharged.
Refrigerant Checks
checkmark.gif Connect an A/C pressure gauge to the HIGH SIDE service port (located in the high pressure hose that runs between the compressor and the condenser in the front of the engine compartment). The gauge will tell you if there is any pressure in the system. Simply depressing the service fitting valve with a small screwdriver to see if any refrigerant squirts out is NOT an accurate check because it tell you how much pressure is in the system. It may still have some pressure but not enough to trip the low pressure safety switch so the compressor will engage.
If your A/C system is low or out of refrigerant, check for leaks, then have the A/C system vacuum purged to remove air. After the air is out, it can be recharged with the specified amount of refrigerant. It is important to get any air out as this will reduce cooling efficiency and may make the compressor noisy.
A/C System Functional Checks
checkmark.gif If the refrigeration circuit seems to be working (refrigerant in the system, compressor running and building pressure), but there is still no cooling, the problem might be an obstruction in the orifice tube (located in the high pressure hose between the condenser in the front of the radiator, and the evaporator located in the passenger compartment). A blockage here will prevent the refrigerant from entering the evaporator or recirculating through the refrigeration circuit.
If the orifice tube is plugged, the high side pressure reading will be lower than normal, and the low side reading will also be lower than normal because no refrigerant is circulating through the system.
checkmark.gif If the refrigeration circuit seems to be functioning normally (compressor running, frost or condensation on the high pressure line from the condenser to the evaporator), but no cool air is blowing out of the ducts inside the car (and the blower is working), the fault is likely a BLEND AIR door that is stuck in the HEAT position, or possibly a badly clogged cabin air filter that is restricting airflow. Another possibility would be a fault in the automatic climate control system such as a ad interior temperature sensor or control module.

Sep 28, 2012 | 2007 Ford Ka 1.3

1 Answer

Toyota Corolla 1995. Quality of air conditioner reduced when stopped (traffic light) or moving at slow speed (condenced city traffic) No problem on the highway. Checked freon gas and fan. Understand that...


Normal, the ac heat exchanger condenser need air moving across the fins to remove the heat. While moving in town the condenser isn't remove the meat that is building up the it's aluminum fins. Even though the vehicle uses an electric fan. The fan is used to cool the engine temperature. If you Toyota is equip-ed with automatic transmission. The electric fan will need to pull enough air to cool the engine temperature, automatic transmission fluid, air conditioner condenser, and maybe power steering condenser to cool the power steering fluid. Later model of vehicles/trucks are using different refrigerants instead R134A in which you Toyota uses.

The simples way to explain is the ac remove heat from inside your Toyota and this heat is removed by the refrigerants inside your ac in the car. To cool the refrigerant this coolant is removed to the heat exchanger condenser located in front of the engine radiator. So, while moving at 60mph there is enough air flow through the radiator, ac head condenser, and other aluminum heat exchangers. GB...stewbison

Sep 12, 2011 | 1995 Toyota Corolla

3 Answers

What kind of refrigerant does a 93 oldsmobile achieva need? Am I able to recharge it with R134a?


Why do people guess, this is what you need
93-92 Olds Achieva All Eng. ....... R-12 42.00 oz Mineral 8.00 oz
Vacumm the system to remove all moister and air (this is a must), I have converted many systems that were R12, with out change anything but the PORTS to allow R134 to charge the system and had no problems, always use high and low gauges, and a temp gauge inside the cars vents, this allows you to see what temp the air is coming out of the vents.
Add enough freon to bring the high side up to 150 psi, this will activate the cooling fan, check the inside temp. add a little at a time till the inside temp drops below 60 degrees, I have been able to get R134 down to 36 degrees, it depends on the systems condition. test drive and be cool.
Good luck

Aug 10, 2010 | 1993 Oldsmobile Achieva

1 Answer

A/c blows hot


Your car is low on refrigerant.
  1. Your system requires R-134A refrigerant which is available at most auto parts stores.
  2. You will also need a hose to connect the refrigerant to the AC system.
  3. You will need to locate the low side AC fitting (looks like a nipple)
  4. With the car running and the AC turned on high, attach the hose to the AC fitting,
  5. attach a can of refrigerant to the other end of the hose.
  6. Turn the screw on the hose to puncture the top of the refrigerant.
  7. Move the can back and forth until the refrigerant is empty.
  8. Detach the hose from the AC system.
Check to see if frost forms on the AC lines under the hood and cool air blowing from the vents inside. If the air isn't cold enough, add another can of refrigerant.
CAUTION: Do not overfill the system. If the system doesn't "**** in" the refrigerant, the compressor needs resetting (disconnect battery 5 min in GM cars and trucks)
I hope this solves your AC issue. All the best!
Greg

May 14, 2009 | 1997 Buick Park Avenue

1 Answer

Air condition is not cooling my car is Honda Civic 2003


Realize that auto AC is basically a refrigerator in a weird layout. It's designed to move heat from one place (the inside of your car) to some other place (the outdoors). While a complete discussion of every specific model and component is well outside the scope of this article, this should give you a start on figuring out what the problem might be and either fixing it yourself or talking intelligently to someone you can pay to fix it.Become familiar with the major components to auto air conditioning:
the compressor, which compresses and circulates the refrigerant in the system the refrigerant, (on modern cars, usually a substance called R-134a older cars have r-12 freon which is becoming increasingly more expensive and hard to find, and also requires a license to handle) which carries the heat the condenser, which changes the phase of the refrigerant and expels heat removed from the car the expansion valve (or orifice tube in some vehicles), which is somewhat of a nozzle and functions to similtaneously drop the pressure of the refrigerant liquid, meter its flow, and atomize it
the evaporator, which transfers heat to the refrigerant from the air blown across it, cooling your car
the receiver/dryer, which functions as a filter for the refrigerant/oil, removing moisture and other contaminants Understand the air conditioning process: The compressor puts the refrigerant under pressure and sends it to the condensing coils. In your car, these coils are generally in front of the radiator. Compressing a gas makes it quite hot. In the condenser, this added heat and the heat the refrigerant picked up in the evaporator is expelled to the air flowing across it from outside the car. When the refrigerant is cooled to its saturation temperature, it will change phase from a gas back into a liquid (this gives off a bundle of heat known as the "latent heat of vaporization"). The liquid then passes through the expansion valve to the evaporator, the coils inside of your car, where it loses pressure that was added to it in the compressor. This causes some of the liquid to change to a low-pressure gas as it cools the remaining liquid. This two-phase mixture enters the evaporator, and the liquid portion of the refrigerant absorbs the heat from the air across the coil and evaporates. Your car's blower circulates air across the cold evaporator and into the interior. The refrigerant goes back through the cycle again and again. Check to see if all the R-134a leaks out (meaning there's nothing in the loop to carry away heat). Leaks are easy to spot but not easy to fix without pulling things apart. Most auto-supply stores carry a fluorescent dye that can be added to the system to check for leaks, and it will have instructions for use on the can. If there's a bad enough leak, the system will have no pressure in it at all. Find one of the valve-stem-looking things and CAREFULLY (eye protection recommended) poke a pen in there to try to valve off pressure, and if there IS none, that's the problem. Make sure the compressor is turning. Start the car, turn on the AC and look under the hood. The AC compressor is generally a pumplike thing off to one side with large rubber and steel hoses going to it. It will not have a filler cap on it, but will often have one or two things that look like the valve stems on a bike tire. The pulley on the front of the compressor exists as an outer pulley and an inner hub which turns when an electric clutch is engaged. If the AC is on and the blower is on, but the center of the pulley is not turning, then the compressor's clutch is not engaging. This could be a bad fuse, a wiring problem, a broken AC switch in your dash, or the system could be low on refrigerant (most systems have a low-pressure safety cutout that will disable the compressor if there isn't enough refrigerant in the system). Look for other things that can go wrong: bad switches, bad fuses, broken wires, broken fan belt (preventing the pump from turning), or seal failure inside the compressor. Feel for any cooling at all. If the system cools, but not much, it could just be low pressure, and you can top up the refrigerant. Most auto-supply stores will have a kit to refill a system, and it will come with instructions. Do not overfill! Adding more than the recommended amount of refrigerant will NOT improve performance but actually will decrease performance. In fact, the more expensive automated equipment found at nicer shops actually monitors cooling performance real-time as it adds refrigerant, and when the performance begins to decrease it removes refrigerant until the performance peaks again.

Apr 21, 2009 | 2003 Honda Civic

2 Answers

2002 Sedone Air Conditioner not coooling enough


if you have had it checked give me the readings of the high and low pressures with the engine running and i can tell you if you have a fan problem ....but it must very accurate info.....vagman54@btinternet.com

Oct 23, 2008 | 2002 Kia Sedona

1 Answer

Air condition/heater


sounds like the air-conditioning expansion valve is probably not working correctly here is a way you can fix your air conditioning:

  1. Realize that auto AC is basically a refrigerator in a weird layout. It's designed to move heat from one place (the inside of your car) to some other place (the outdoors). While a complete discussion of every specific model and component is well outside the scope of this article, this should give you a start on figuring out what the problem might be and either fixing it yourself or talking intelligently to someone you can pay to fix it.
  1. Become familiar with the major components to auto air conditioning:

  2. the compressor, which compresses and circulates the refrigerant in the system
  • the refrigerant, (on modern cars, usually a substance called R-134a older cars have r-12 freon which is becoming increasingly more expensive and hard to find, and also requires a license to handle) which carries the heat
  • the condenser, which changes the phase of the refrigerant and expels heat removed from the car
  • the expansion valve (or orifice tube in some vehicles), which is somewhat of a nozzle and functions to similtaneously drop the pressure of the refrigerant liquid, meter its flow, and atomize it
  • the evaporator, which transfers heat to the refrigerant from the air blown across it, cooling your car
  • the receiver/dryer, which functions as a filter for the refrigerant/oil, removing moisture and other contaminants
  1. Understand the air conditioning process: The compressor puts the refrigerant under pressure and sends it to the condensing coils. In your car, these coils are generally in front of the radiator. Compressing a gas makes it quite hot. In the condenser, this added heat and the heat the refrigerant picked up in the evaporator is expelled to the air flowing across it from outside the car. When the refrigerant is cooled to its saturation temperature, it will change phase from a gas back into a liquid (this gives off a bundle of heat known as the "latent heat of vaporization"). The liquid then passes through the expansion valve to the evaporator, the coils inside of your car, where it loses pressure that was added to it in the compressor. This causes some of the liquid to change to a low-pressure gas as it cools the remaining liquid. This two-phase mixture enters the evaporator, and the liquid portion of the refrigerant absorbs the heat from the air across the coil and evaporates. Your car's blower circulates air across the cold evaporator and into the interior. The refrigerant goes back through the cycle again and again.
  2. Check to see if all the R-134a leaks out (meaning there's nothing in the loop to carry away heat). Leaks are easy to spot but not easy to fix without pulling things apart. Most auto-supply stores carry a fluorescent dye that can be added to the system to check for leaks, and it will have instructions for use on the can. If there's a bad enough leak, the system will have no pressure in it at all. Find one of the valve-stem-looking things and CAREFULLY (eye protection recommended) poke a pen in there to try to valve off pressure, and if there IS none, that's the problem.
  3. Make sure the compressor is turning. Start the car, turn on the AC and look under the hood. The AC compressor is generally a pumplike thing off to one side with large rubber and steel hoses going to it. It will not have a filler cap on it, but will often have one or two things that look like the valve stems on a bike tire. The pulley on the front of the compressor exists as an outer pulley and an inner hub which turns when an electric clutch is engaged. If the AC is on and the blower is on, but the center of the pulley is not turning, then the compressor's clutch is not engaging. This could be a bad fuse, a wiring problem, a broken AC switch in your dash, or the system could be low on refrigerant (most systems have a low-pressure safety cutout that will disable the compressor if there isn't enough refrigerant in the system).
  4. Look for other things that can go wrong: bad switches, bad fuses, broken wires, broken fan belt (preventing the pump from turning), or seal failure inside the compressor.
  5. Feel for any cooling at all. If the system cools, but not much, it could just be low pressure, and you can top up the refrigerant. Most auto-supply stores will have a kit to refill a system, and it will come with instructions. Do not overfill! Adding more than the recommended amount of refrigerant will NOT improve performance but actually will decrease performance. In fact, the more expensive automated equipment found at nicer shops actually monitors cooling performance real-time as it adds refrigerant, and when the performance begins to decrease it removes refrigerant until the performance peaks again.

Jun 05, 2008 | 2001 Ford F150 Styleside SuperCrew

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