Question about 1996 Toyota Camry

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Lost power, Bright red hot exhaust

I was driving 55 mph on the highway and it just started losing power.I eventually came to a stop and I barely keep it running. I shut it off and opened hood . The Exhaust manifold was bright cherry red. I let it set overnight and it still won't start this morning .Any ideas?

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  • mwiebenga Mar 16, 2009

    Well you were pretty close, It was unburned fuel. The problem was the distributer cap was shot. Thankfully it was an inexpensive fix.

  • Toyota Ed May 11, 2010

    You have a very large issue on your hands. The exhaust is red hot due to too much fuel being dumped/unburned. That could be a timing issue, injectors sticking open, a bad fuel pressure regulator, or a host of other issues. You need a professional auto mechanic to look your vehicle over. Without seeing your vehicle in person, we here at FixYa are incapable of solving your problem. Sorry.

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Svermish is correct, remove the converter, the car should start, then take the car to a repair shop and have the converter replaced.

Posted on Feb 28, 2009

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Plug or restricted catalitic converter, removing the o2 sensor and installing a back pressure gauge will verify.

Posted on Feb 27, 2009

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Going down the highway at 55-60 mph I just barely tap the gas and the vehicle jumps, I press the gas hard and it stops, leave off the gas check engine light blinks and jumping continues.


A blinking light usually means exhaust system probably catalic converter. You most likely have a small blockage in it which means exhaust can't get out correctly. Have vehicle scanned at autozone or similar.

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Tip

Save Money on Gas/Petrol


  1. Avoid idling. While idling, your car gets exactly 0 miles per gallon while starting the car uses the same amount as idling for 6 seconds. Park your car and go into the restaurant rather than idling in the drive-through. Idling with the air conditioning on also uses extra fuel. Also, avoid going so fast that you have to brake for someone. Whenever you brake, you waste the gas it took to get going that fast.
  2. Drive at a consistent speed. Avoid quick acceleration and hard braking. Cruise control will keep you at a constant speed, even when going up and down hills.
  3. Avoid stops. If approaching a red light, see if you can slow down enough to avoid having to actually stop (because you reach the light after it is green). Speeding up from 5 or 10 miles per hour will be easier on the gas than starting from full stop.
  4. Anticipate the stop signs and lights. Look far ahead; get to know your usual routes. You can let up on the gas earlier. Coasting to a stop will save the gasoline you would otherwise use maintaining your speed longer. If it just gets you to the end of a line of cars at a red light or a stop sign a few seconds later, it won't add any time to your trip. Ditto for coasting to lose speed before a highway off-ramp: if it means you catch up with that truck halfway around the curve instead of at the beginning, you haven't lost any time. In many cities, if you know the streets well, you can time the lights and maintain the appropriate speed to hit all green lights. Usually this is about 35 to 40 MPH.
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Runs good at first then drops off and keeps getting worst. Exhaust manifold got cherry red


Check for the timing and re-adjust valve clearance...waht kind of engine you have...

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Just did an engine was on my 2000 ford expedition and now i have no power barely get 5 to 10 mph what could this be after the engine wash i changed spark plugs and no change my cat is also bright red when...


All your cats are ruined
All your O2 Sensors are ruined

Now you need to find out why the cat failed, in less than 15 years
BEFORE you replace them all.

What does-just did an engine mean?

For the converter to be red hot, the
timing chains are out of wack or
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2001 Mazda MPV lost power while accelerating on to highway. I have no codes on scanner and no engine light. Idles OK but placing transmission in drive and holding brakes @ 2000 rpm, engine starts to lose...


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Fortunately there is only one
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You may also notice that if the vehicle is idling for awhile and you look underneath the exhaust may be glowing red in some areas, extremely hot
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