Question about 1999 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

99 cavailer 2.2 engine wont idle properly keeps surging

I have changed the tps sensor, idleair mixture solinoid, map sensor,

Posted by on

  • mike loshbough
    mike loshbough May 11, 2010

    have you ohmed out the injectors to see what resistance they have?

×

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

  • Contributor
  • 1 Answer

Take the hose off the intake at the throttle boby and spray it with some type of intake cleaner spray wile car is running keep car running this will make it better

Posted on Feb 21, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

1990 Jeep Wrangler 2.5l idles rough/ black smoke/ fuel odor


You could pay a garage to diagnose the problem cheaper than throwing more parts at it.
The problems may be connected or they may be different issues.
Yes I would change the oil and filter, but first I would make sure the fuel system is not dumping too much fuel into the cylinders.
The O2 sensor helps the computer decide on how much fuel the engine needs, along with the other sensors. And you said you have already replaced the O2 sensor.
A mechanic would take a scanner and "read" the sensors and look for something out of normal range.
The fuel pump and fuel filter are off the list as far as causing a rich mixture goes.
I would start with the rich mixture and then see if fixing that issue takes care of the no start when hot issue.
Change the oil and filter first, and see if the injector is on too much.
You can watch the spray and tell - at idle it should be very light.
Also look at the engine temp - is it warming up to normal 195 degrees? Can you tell if the fuel pressure regulator is blown and pouring fuel into the throttle body ?
Without a scanner its going to be more difficult, but not impossible to diagnose.
Let me know what you find out.

Jul 23, 2012 | 1990 Jeep Wrangler

Tip

Driveability Tuning: TPS + Idle Air Mixture


Let me share some information not found elsewhere about how to set your Throtle Position Sensor (TPS) and throtle plate after cleaning the throttle body. This article is about tuning your engine to get an happy ECM not race track nitrous tricks. The on-board OBDII ECM controls just about everything engine wise but for that it relies on a few bases set below. In OBDII era everything is controled with extrim acuracy. If a parameter is off you get bad driveability symptoms if the ECM can not detune the engine enough to compensate. We are not even talking engine code here. You'll get a CEL if something is busted not for driveability issues like misfirings induced by lean mixtures (no CEL but degraded driveability regardless - Trust me I design computers).

Set the throtle plate to be almost fully shut closed plus a quarter turn of the screw so it is not sticking ie. opened as little as possible. At this position you have base idle at which the TPS should read 0.6000 VDC (ie. 600.0 mV) in the car powered by the computer circuitry.
Note that at 610.0 mV you are off idle!! (ECM deactivates vacum engine mounts coil) So adjust acuratly to no more than 600mV +/- 2mV

Set the "Idle Air Mixture" screw to about 1/2 or 3/4 turn opened from fully seated. This is to provide idle air to the engine by bypassing the throttle plate.
More or less air is NOT better - There is an exact amount of air needed to mix with the exact amount of gaz injected at idle.

- Not enough air will give you a surge at pick-up and cause pinging and overall poor driveability at low speeds. The surge is caused by the computer jurking the Idle Air Valve opened to adjust the mixture.
- Too much air will keep the car moving when you let go the gaz pedal AND decrease the vacum available for your break booster.

So better not enough idle air than too idle much air.
By properly tuning the fuel injection you will increase the low-rpm power and you'll potentially save gas as well with increased power.
I find my engine drives around town about 1,100 rpm with amaising tork not always above 2,000 like before tuning!
I also have a TL'05 with the fancy throtle-by-wire, same thing is true. great tork when the idle mixture is set properly which no mecanics ever set. These setings are root to many poor driveability issues. It can not be acuratly factory set or should be retuned every 50,000Mi to match the engine conditions.

The acid test to know when your engine is well tuned: backup a 40% hill slowly. If it is smooth you have it. If the engine surges, misfires or hesitates you are off the chart by as little as 1/4 or 1/2 turn or more. The closer you are to the target mixture the better your engine runs. Aproach the IAM setting on the increasing side: from close to open.
Why backup a hill?? The reverse gear: is actually hard for the engine to drive because it is realy long. Up the hill: is to put the engine under load.

Love tuning these V6 3.2L and crusing around on tork alone while saving green house gases! Third gear WOT is really nice too.

Acura aluminum engines have some electrical ground issues because the ground straps and AL don't like each other (disimilar metals and AL forms an insulating oxide) - Tip: clean up all your ground straps connections including the ECM ground post directly on the thermostat housing and coat them with AL electrical wires compound from Lowes/HomeDepot. Well worth the trouble as well.

on Feb 24, 2009 | 2001 Acura 3.2CL

1 Answer

Put a lt1 engine in 1994 caprice it skips and wont hardly go up hills and back fires


Hello! are you using the harness for that year LT1? the fuel air mixture is controled by the Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor, the Throttle Positioning (TPS) sensor and the Oxygen sensors...When you put your foot in it without O2 sensors there isn't any control over fuel/air mix and ignition advance if the MAP and TPS aren't connected...I'm assuming your using the LT1 ECM...Guru...saailer

May 03, 2012 | 1994 Chevrolet Caprice Classic

1 Answer

Idle surges up and down on 1984 cadillac coupe deville


I A C motor small part on throttle body ,controls idle mixture when they fail at idle the engine "hunts" for proper air/fuel mixture . when defective it causes o2 sensors and TPS to compete to set an idle thus the up n down effect.. auto wreckers if your broke new from your local parts store....dealer to much 1 plug in two bolts for most applications

Feb 06, 2012 | 1984 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

When i punch on the gass my 97 tahoe hesitates


usually a bad MAP sensor or TPS. I would test both. Let me know if you have questions and provide test results for repair advice.

MAP Sensor TESTING
See Figures 3, 4 and 5
  1. Backprobe with a high impedance voltmeter at MAP sensor terminals A and C.
  2. With the key ON and engine off, the voltmeter reading should be approximately 5.0 volts.
  3. If the voltage is not as specified, either the wiring to the MAP sensor or the ECM may be faulty. Correct any wiring or ECM faults before continuing test.
  4. Backprobe with the high impotence voltmeter at MAP sensor terminals B and A.
  5. Verify that the sensor voltage is approximately 0.5 volts with the engine not running (at sea level).
  6. Record MAP sensor voltage with the key ON and engine off.
  7. Start the vehicle.
  8. Verify that the sensor voltage is greater than 1.5 volts (above the recorded reading) at idle.
  9. Verify that the sensor voltage increases to approximately 4.5. volts (above the recorded reading) at Wide Open Throttle (WOT).
  10. If the sensor voltage is as specified, the sensor is functioning properly.
  11. If the sensor voltage is not as specified, check the sensor and the sensor vacuum source for a leak or a restriction. If no leaks or restrictions are found, the sensor may be defective and should be replaced.



jturcotte_512.jpg

Fig. Fig. 3: Location of the MAP sensor-TBI system shown


jturcotte_513.jpg

Fig. Fig. 4: Probe the terminals of the MAP sensor to check for proper reference voltage


jturcotte_1792.gif

Fig. Fig. 5: Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor wiring diagram








TPS TESTINGSee Figures 2, 3 and 4

  1. Backprobe with a high impedance voltmeter at TPS terminals A and B.
  2. With the key ON and engine off, the voltmeter reading should be approximately 5.0 volts.
  3. If the voltage is not as specified, either the wiring to the TPS or the ECM may be faulty. Correct any wiring or ECM faults before continuing test.
  4. Backprobe with a high impedance voltmeter at terminals C and B.
  5. With the key ON and engine off and the throttle closed, the TPS voltage should be approximately 0.5-1.2 volts.
  6. Verify that the TPS voltage increases or decreases smoothly as the throttle is opened or closed. Make sure to open and close the throttle very slowly in order to detect any abnormalities in the TPS voltage reading.
  7. If the sensor voltage is not as specified, replace the sensor.



jturcotte_514.jpg

Fig. Fig. 2: Using a DVOM, backprobe terminals A and B of the TPS sensor to check for proper reference voltage


jturcotte_515.jpg

Fig. Fig. 3: Using the DVOM, backprobe terminals C and B of the TPS sensor, open and close the throttle and make sure the voltage changes smoothly


jturcotte_1793.gif

Fig. Fig. 4: Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) wiring diagram

May 30, 2011 | Chevrolet Tahoe Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Code po105 pops up i had it reset and every 3-4 days it lights back up what does it mean ?


Generic code results from http://www.obd-codes.com/p0105 :

P0105 - MAP Circuit Malfunction

Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction

The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

FB.init("dd7d9e9681341cde77587bc6a2029f6f"); OBD-Codes.com on Facebook


Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:

  • Poor running engine
  • Engine runs rich
  • Engine won't idle
  • Engine backfires through tailpipe
  • Engine misfire under load or at idle
  • MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
  • In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

A P0105 DTC could be caused by:

  • MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
  • Bad MAP sensor
  • Bad TPS
  • Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
  • Damaged or problematic TPS connector
  • Damaged wiring
  • Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
  • Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Bad PCM

Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

  1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
  2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:

  1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
  2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
  3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

Feb 27, 2011 | Jaguar X-Type Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Wont switch gears tell at 5500 rpms


check out tps sensor it has a big effect on shifting of vehicle. The data provided by TPS is invaluable for proper startup, idle and easy throttle response of the car. These operations are affected when a bad throttle position sensor feeds erroneous data to the car's computer because of which the:
  • Engine malfunction indicator light (MIL) is turned on
  • The driver of a car experiences difficulty while changing gears.
  • The fuel economy of the car drops drastically.
  • Causes difficulty in setting base-ignition-timing of the car a bad tps causes transmission shift issues, bucking, jerking, idle surging, engine cut off, hesitation on take off, surge while cruising down highway. it may not be that but try another one and find out. you can test the tps, just unplug connector to it. use a ohms meter and hook one lead to the top and other to the center prongs on tps itself. next move throttle very slow, if good tps will move needle on ohms tester it will sweep up without cutting out. but if you perform this test and the needle hesitates at any time you move throttle plate it is bad. 1 is ground, 2 is signal, the prongs on tps. good-luck

Jan 29, 2011 | 2001 Chevrolet Malibu

1 Answer

I have this eobd code problem p0105 in my elantra, where those sensors?


P0105 - Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction
The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:
* Poor running engine
* Engine runs rich
* Engine won't idle
* Engine backfires through tailpipe
* Engine misfire under load or at idle
* MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
* In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

Causes: A P0105 DTC could be caused by:
* MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
* Bad MAP sensor
* Bad TPS
* Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
* Damaged or problematic TPS connector
* Damaged wiring
* Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
* Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Bad PCM

Possible Solutions:
Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:
1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

MAP sensor codes include P0106, P0107, P0108 and P0109 .


LOCATIONS:
Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Sensor: The MAP sensor is located against the firewall to the left side of the engine.
Barometric Pressure Sensor: This sensor is installed on the VAF sensor; Volume Air Flow Sensor Is located in the air intake plenum assembly.

Hope this helps.

Jan 24, 2011 | 2001 Hyundai Elantra

1 Answer

I have a p0105 error. They say this is a dirty body throttle. How can I clean this myself? My car is a 2002 Chevy Envoy.


DTC P0105 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction or Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction


What does that mean?
The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

Symptoms: Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:
* Poor running engine
* Engine runs rich
* Engine won't idle
* Engine backfires through tailpipe
* Engine misfire under load or at idle
* MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
* In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

Causes: A P0105 DTC could be caused by:
* MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
* Bad MAP sensor
* Bad TPS
* Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
* Damaged or problematic TPS connector
* Damaged wiring
* Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
* Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Bad PCM

Possible Solutions: Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:

1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

MAP sensor codes include P0105, P0106, P0107, P0108 and P0109 .


Hope helps (remember rated this).

Jul 09, 2010 | 2002 GMC Envoy

Not finding what you are looking for?
1999 Chevrolet Cavalier Logo

Related Topics:

236 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Chevrolet Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

60960 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

21949 Answers

Jeff Turcotte
Jeff Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

6812 Answers

Are you a Chevrolet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...